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Inquiry to the history of the colour named English Mustard


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#19 NJS

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 05:44 AM

Dear NJS, I have not lost my sense of humour in regard to you because I admire your cultivation and both the selection of that beautiful bird as well as your scholarship. I am not at all excited in a negative way about our exchange - on the contrary, I'm quite grateful you took the trouble to write me, and I have learned quite a bit in this episode about mustard and how easily I get things confused. I shall view Colman's mustard online again, and appreciate as well your reflection that New & Lingwood's name for one colour in jumbo cord trousers (sold out) is indeed new for you. Please do be careful on the street and beaches of Rio - in revolutionary times innocent victims get hurt.

Thank you for all this. We live in a Sleepy Hollow, 50 miles outside the Marvellous City, and the only thing here which has been revolting recently is our refrigerator

 

:)  


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#20 Naive Jr

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 01:18 PM

"We live in a Sleepy Hollow, 50 miles outside the Marvellous City, and the only thing here which has been revolting recently is our refrigerator."

 

According to Walter Bühler about such Sleepy Hollows in Brasil, several of their inhabitants have met unexpected visitors in at least forty cases he reports in the book in German which unfortunately seems out of print.

www.ignaciodarnaude.com/ufologia/Buhler,Dr.Walter-2.htm    

http://biografiaufol...ian-nasceu.html


Edited by Naive Jr, 03 July 2013 - 01:46 PM.

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#21 culverwood

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:07 AM

NJS - I have always suspected that Naive Jr is a modern Henry Root


Edited by culverwood, 04 July 2013 - 12:08 AM.


#22 Naive Jr

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 07:41 AM

From what little I just read about Henry Root by means of superficial research with my primitive mobile phone and my remembrance of that noble and amiable countenance from Mr Gilchrist's pastures, I recognise my superiors, fictive or fact.

Today I received news that Michael Howelett, my esteemed liaison at N&L, crossed the threshold a short time ago in a hospital where he underwent treatment for another round with an opponent who could KO him because Michael shortly after his 50th April 26 2012 was diagnosed with an incurable malady which weakened him.
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#23 NJS

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 08:12 AM

NJS - I have always suspected that Naive Jr is a modern Henry Root

 

Yes, I suspect that his normal means of transport is silver-coloured and saucer-shaped

:) Just like our neighbours' transport, in fact. I mean - 'Sleepy Hollow' - be damned - it's bloody Brigadoon around these sites, sometimes!


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#24 OJD

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 08:54 AM

Has this got out of hand slightly?



#25 Naive Jr

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 09:47 AM

I initiated the thread and am honoured by posts from both persons, who enriched my horizon. <Out of hand> is the question, but use of the metaphor by one whose signet is a thimble means what it might not in reflection. In any case the critic provides no alternative.
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#26 Naive Jr

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 09:47 AM

I initiated the thread and am honoured by posts from both persons, who enriched my horizon. <Out of hand> is the question, but use of the metaphor by one whose signet is a thimble means what it might not in reflection. In any case the critic provides no alternative.
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#27 Naive Jr

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 09:47 AM

I initiated the thread and am honoured by posts from both persons, who enriched my horizon. <Out of hand> is the question, but use of the metaphor by one whose signet is a thimble means what it might not in reflection. In any case the critic provides no alternative.
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#28 Naive Jr

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 09:51 AM

My mobile phone triplicated - out of hand!
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#29 hutch48

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 05:28 PM

While mustard is something I usually associate with a ham sandwich, the image of English mustard is most probably something that an Englishman (or woman) puts on a ham sandwich in England but I seriously doubt it has much to do with a reproducable colour, no matter what the recollection may happen to be.

 

Now as I suffer from a liberal dose of historical English empiricism, looking for a more objective technique of colour matching yields such reference as the following URL.

 

http://www.pantone.c...e.aspx?pg=19970

 

Some time ago I had to try and match the third colour scheme that had been used on my house which was done in about 1910 so i borrowed a set of pantone colour reference cards from my next door neighbor and compared them with a scraped off layer of paint and got a very good match from it. Now when it comes to fabrics to make clothing with, you are either at the mercy of what fabric vendors have available OR what a fabric dyer can tweak for you but you must also be aware that different lighting conditions effect the perceived colour of an item.



#30 OJD

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 03:53 AM

I initiated the thread and am honoured by posts from both persons, who enriched my horizon. <Out of hand> is the question, but use of the metaphor by one whose signet is a thimble means what it might not in reflection. In any case the critic provides no alternative.

 

Why are you so aggressive?



#31 NJS

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 05:43 AM

The full Oxford English Dictionary defines 'mustard yellow' as the 'dark brownish yellow colour of mustard'. It does not bring 'English' into it.
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#32 Naive Jr

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 08:16 AM

I shall ask Pantone. OED is an essential source. I apologise for unintentional offense.
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#33 NJS

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 11:42 AM

You haven't offended me!


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#34 Naive Jr

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 05:25 AM

My bird lover and fashion historian's reply he didn't feel offended by what I wrote show my shorthand style of three sentences, one for each poster, unclear. But he did complain the site resembled a bloody B-doon, according to my superficial search a musical and film story about two Americans who find themselves in Scottish village unknown to exoteric cartography which reincarnates every century or two, etc. My third sentence of apology was to the poster who asked me why I'm so aggressive. So she shares the style of statement without presenting grounds, but if it doesn't seem necessary to her to explain to me, what should I do?
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#35 Naive Jr

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 05:25 AM

My bird lover and fashion historian's reply he didn't feel offended by what I wrote show my shorthand style of three sentences, one for each poster, unclear. But he did complain the site resembled a bloody B-doon, according to my superficial search a musical and film story about two Americans who find themselves in Scottish village unknown to exoteric cartography which reincarnates every century or two, etc. My third sentence of apology was to the poster who asked me why I'm so aggressive. So she shares the style of statement without presenting grounds, but if it doesn't seem necessary to her to explain to me, what should I do?
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#36 Naive Jr

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 05:47 AM

1. Hutch48: I'll try to ask Pantone if English Mustard is on any record
2. Creatures of the sky in Sleepy Hollow
3. Apology for aggressive impression.


Edited by Naive Jr, 06 July 2013 - 07:10 AM.

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