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Critique my Shirt


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#19 Torry Kratch

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 05:45 PM

Please critique my shirt below and let me know if there are any problems and what needs to be corrected.

+ 1 :hi:

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#20 Sanguis Mortuum

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 11:09 PM

http://lacamiciaconlanima.blogspot.com/

Maybe you read ot look through this, it is nice done.


This post on that blog seems to describe a similar shoulder ripple to the one the OP is seeing (and which I've been having some trouble with on my shirts), but an automatic translation of the text doesn't provide a very useful result. Is there anyone who can describe the correction that is being done in this blog post?

#21 Nishijin

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 02:18 AM

There is no real explanation of the solution, only that the shoulder piece has been redrawn. I happen to know both Mary (the author of the blog) and Pierre (the shirtmaker who taught her), so I'll ask them next time I'm in touch.
http://www.paulgrassart.com

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#22 Torry Kratch

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Posted 24 July 2011 - 10:20 PM

Perhaps repeat the request because there is no reaction.

Please critique my shirt and let me know if there are any problems and what needs to be corrected!
:hi:

Edited by Torry Kratch, 24 July 2011 - 10:23 PM.


#23 Nishijin

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Posted 24 July 2011 - 10:32 PM

Torry,

I know little about shirts. You should pm members who make shirts.

The diagonal folds in the left-arm sleeve may mean that you should rotate the sleevehead in the armhole. But maybe it is because of the gathering at the top, I'm not used to this feature and the effect it has on the drape of fabric.

The body seems good.

It's the first time I've seen a men's shirt with a neck dart in the front, that's a novel idea. Why not, it does help for a close fit.

In the back, I find making pleats help to get a cleaner back, but it is a style issue, there is nothing wrong with what you've done.
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#24 Terri

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Posted 24 July 2011 - 10:59 PM

You should show your sleeve pattern

#25 Torry Kratch

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 12:39 AM

Nishijin, the idea of breast dart shirt is not really new:


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Terri, so please patern:

regular sleeve
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Modeling wrinkles on his sleeve
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Edited by Torry Kratch, 25 July 2011 - 01:07 AM.


#26 Todd Hudson

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 05:10 AM

Torry,
I love the breast dart and thank you for showing us that it is an old trick. I wanted to start using something similar for my shirts. I admit I feel more comfortable selling this essential fitting solution as a "traditional" feature. It allows you to necessarily widen the front neckpoint (compared to width of back neck point) but avoid button stand from drooping.

You are "posing" like a model with body imbalanced in many photos so it is very difficult to assess fit. If you were in my shop I would keep telling you "stand even".

Please retake the pictures and use this trick I learned from Erik Gavrilov: close eyes, walk in place, stop walking, snap picture.

Here is what we want to see:
front
back
right profile
left profile

Thank you,
Todd

#27 greger

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 07:52 AM

The dart is there because the bib is part of the shirt. See darts on bush shirts and military uniforms. On a regular shirt? Never seen that before. Maybe it will catch on. Are there other shirt patterns that show it?

#28 rs232

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 09:20 AM

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Torry,

I really like the detail and attention on the plackets, collar and yoke.

Here are some of my thoughts on your pattern:
  • Your pattern seems to suggest that you are the same hip and chest measure. Are you really? There appears to be a significant visual difference in your photos.
  • I admit darts are a stylistic choice, but if you like, you can reduce the need for back darts by taking more out of the side seam than you have. I find I don't really need the extra fabric around the waist; just the shoulders and chest for mobility.
  • You can also reduce the need for a front dart by doing shaping with a curved seam on the front yoke. It's odd; all RTW shirts seem to have straight seams here, but this part of the body is a concave hollow area.
  • The crown of the sleeve is gathered, but this is not where the extra fabric needs to be. (As a stylistic choice, this is fine, but your yoke seam extends to the end of your shoulder, so there's no need to have a gathered crown to fit over the shoulder deltoid muscle.) The extra fabric needs to allow you to bend over and reach forward (for example, to touch your knees), so it needs to be accross the back and underneath (infraspinatus).


I am a similar body type to you, so I will cut and make up a shirt to demonstrate what I have proposed so that others can discuss. (I am not an expert, so it probably won't look as nice as yours!)
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#29 Torry Kratch

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 06:11 PM



You are "posing" like a model with body imbalanced in many photos so it is very difficult to assess fit. If you were in my shop I would keep telling you "stand even".



Todd, I'm not assume a dignified air, a natural posture.

Who is Erik Gavrilov? He said the right thing (by the way, I knew it from the tailor books). ps He has a Russian last name.

I'm going to sew other shirts and apply your advice for photography, and this shirt ... already in the wash.

Edited by Torry Kratch, 25 July 2011 - 06:12 PM.


#30 Torry Kratch

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 06:19 PM

The dart is there because the bib is part of the shirt. See darts on bush shirts and military uniforms. On a regular shirt? Never seen that before. Maybe it will catch on. Are there other shirt patterns that show it?


greger,I'm not copy something that already exists. I take ideas for their own decisions. If it does not look bad, then why not apply?

#31 Torry Kratch

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 06:31 PM

rs232, do you have a good eye! Really measure my chest 51 cm, hips measure 46.5 cm Yes I made those changes in the side seams that you mentioned.
For the rest of the points I completely agree, except for a concave shoulder seam. I do not understand why the back shoulder should be a trough?

I tried to replicate in a modern shirt (old) Italian style. Italians are "mothballed" and imitate the ancient technology of cut.

Edited by Torry Kratch, 25 July 2011 - 06:34 PM.


#32 Nishijin

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 08:40 PM

Increasing the waist suppression in the side seam is not the same at all as having darts in the back. Darts are in the right place for anatomy. Too much waist suppression in the side seam will create drags. A trick would be to move the side seam a little backward when increasing waist suppression.


I find the idea of hollowing the seam between front and yoke very good. But it is not the same as the neck dart.
Neck dart is OK on solids, but it will be a mess on stripes. On the old pattern you showed, it is hidden in the bib's seam. Maybe on a modern shirt, it could be hidden in the button placket.
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http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#33 posaune

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 09:53 PM

I underline all Nishijn has said.

idea of hollowing the seam between front and yoke very good. But it is not the same as the neck dart.


If you do this, you can do this only with a plain color not with stripes or checkers. And even then I would do it not to the yoke.

I add a remark about the crown high of the sleeve. If you have such a tight fit at bust circ. - in my opinion - is the sleeve crown too flat (and too wide - if you want a clean shape). I use such a sleeve only for a shirt with an ease about min. 12 cm at bust and a deep cut armhole.

lg
posaune

Reading your following post Nishjin

I agree with you, it is a good thing to do. Maybe a misunderstanding: I would do it only to the shirt side seam not to the yoke.

Edited by posaune, 26 July 2011 - 03:33 AM.


#34 Nishijin

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 01:16 AM

I needed something to change my mind this afternoon, so I played a little with shirts.
I've found that the breast dart can be hidden in the front yoke seam. It will not create the room for the chest, but it will still crooken the neckpoint to bring the buttonstand closer to the body.

And hollowing the front yoke seam is a good idea indeed (though as I thought it does nothing like the breast dart).
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#35 Torry Kratch

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 04:28 AM

Nishijin, you can make a technical drawing? I do not fully get the correct translation from Google.

Edited by Torry Kratch, 26 July 2011 - 04:29 AM.


#36 Todd Hudson

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 06:28 AM

Todd,

Who is Erik Gavrilov? He said the right thing (by the way, I knew it from the tailor books). ps He has a Russian last name.


Erik is my buddy in California. He is a forum member and online: http://artisantailor.com




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