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Sourcing Tailor's Equipment & Supplies


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#1 ladhrann

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 10:36 AM

Hello all,

Generally I operate on a cut, make and trim basis with the tailors I go to. This has resulted in one tailor with very poor English asking me to source an odd piece of equipment for him. Its like a trouser board/sleeve board except it isn't and like a tailors ham but again not really.

It has the shape of a guitar back, and is padded on top and the kidneybean shaped area then narrows down like a sleeve board. Its big enough and is the length and width of a real guitar being 70cm x 30cm wide. Now he only knows what its called in Polish and it doesn't look like anything I've found online with tailors outfitters or on this forum. Can anyone tell me what it would be called in English and then where I might source one?

This gent left all his equipment in Poland when he came over here to work and is a bit sick of (but very busy) doing alterations the whole time so he might make me a suit, if I can get this and domette/collar/chest/horsehair canvas etc. for him.

Edited by ladhrann, 30 June 2012 - 10:45 PM.


#2 meiissi

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 11:45 AM

hello!

where is "here"? was watching your profile but did not find out where you are resident. I found a "bügelbock" here in vienna at klos-company http://www.klos.at/d...iderei-geräte/
and also several on ebay http://www.ebay.de/s..._nkw=bügelbock

I don´t know what it´s called in english, but i thought maybe this would be still interesting for you.

good luck :-)
meiissi

#3 Tony Rutherford

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 06:01 PM

Dear Meiissi,

Thanks for posting the ebay listing for these hams, I've been looking for one for ages !

Tony

#4 ladhrann

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 09:48 PM

Hello Meiissi,

I am based in Ireland. That 'bügelbock' looks like what he was talking about, thanks a million for finding those links for me. A lot of the best suppliers seem to be based in Austria and Germany, the only trouble is they don't reply to emails in English a lot of the time!

Danke Schon

#5 Terri

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 10:06 PM

It has the shape of a guitar back, and is padded on top and the kidneybean shaped area then narrows down like a sleeve board.


We have one exactly like you describe (but longer) at work but it has been stored away for the summer. I think it was made in house by one of our carpenters,not commercially though.
The bucks for sale on ebay are really nice, we have some of them too.

Edited by Terri, 30 June 2012 - 10:07 PM.


#6 ladhrann

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 10:46 PM

We have one exactly like you describe (but longer) at work but it has been stored away for the summer. I think it was made in house by one of our carpenters,not commercially though.
The bucks for sale on ebay are really nice, we have some of them too.


Hi Terri,

Thanks for posting. Do you know what this type of thing is called at all?

#7 Terri

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 12:34 AM

Do you know what this type of thing is called at all?


Not really other than a pressing buck.....I'll ask around.

#8 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 01:43 AM

Hello Meiissi,

I am based in Ireland. That 'bügelbock' looks like what he was talking about, thanks a million for finding those links for me. A lot of the best suppliers seem to be based in Austria and Germany, the only trouble is they don't reply to emails in English a lot of the time!

Danke Schon


Not many Germans in low level positons are able to speak English, so you hardly get an answer.

You need PROFI Bügelbock Körperform and PROFI Bügelbock / Bügelkissen Eiform auf Holzgestell

Edited by Der Zuschneider, 01 July 2012 - 01:47 AM.

www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#9 ladhrann

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 02:58 AM

Not many Germans in low level positons are able to speak English, so you hardly get an answer.

You need PROFI Bügelbock Körperform and PROFI Bügelbock / Bügelkissen Eiform auf Holzgestell


Thanks Zuschneider for the German terms, the Bugelbock Korperform is what he wants. I'll see what myself and google/translate can manage between us. Let me know of any Profi stockists in Germany, the UK or the EU. Cheers again.

#10 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 01:34 PM

Thanks Zuschneider for the German terms, the Bugelbock Korperform is what he wants. I'll see what myself and google/translate can manage between us. Let me know of any Profi stockists in Germany, the UK or the EU. Cheers again.


Those bucks are good, probably they send them to IE.
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#11 Torry Kratch

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 05:49 AM

It is amazing!, --- In my town (Odessa) is a device for ironing called in Russian бигельбок "bügelbock." But in Kiev and Moscow, the word no one knows tailors.

There is no doubt a legacy of German tailors. Only their history erased by time.

#12 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 12:48 AM

It is amazing!, --- In my town (Odessa) is a device for ironing called in Russian бигельбок "bügelbock." But in Kiev and Moscow, the word no one knows tailors.

There is no doubt a legacy of German tailors. Only their history erased by time.


Amazing! Germans just translated the word in Cyrillic letters. The German tailors carried that big and heavy thing to Russia.
But in Kiev there were many Germans, they should know that word as well.
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#13 ladhrann

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 09:02 AM

I have another few puzzles for you all.

Is there such a thing as a camelhair canvas tape? Like a banrol or other waistband stiffener but not fusible?

Also has anyone heard of a jacket construction that uses both a fusible and stitched-in canvas at the same time? This tailor has mentioned using a fusible to create the clean look for the front of the jacket but also doing all the handwork of swelled edges (aka pick-stitching/saddle-stitching), and hand stitching the body canvas and doing all the pad-stitching on the lapels by hand.

#14 Schneidergott

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 03:34 PM

I have another few puzzles for you all.

Also has anyone heard of a jacket construction that uses both a fusible and stitched-in canvas at the same time? This tailor has mentioned using a fusible to create the clean look for the front of the jacket but also doing all the handwork of swelled edges (aka pick-stitching/saddle-stitching), and hand stitching the body canvas and doing all the pad-stitching on the lapels by hand.


The fused fronts and stitched in chest canvas is called "half canvassed", if I recall correctly.
And since it is a higher level of making it has made it's way into better MTM production, you will find "semi traditionell" (meaning half way between fused and fully canvassed) as an option (which usually means more expensive) at some companies.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

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#15 Martin Stall

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 04:50 PM

I remember a Savile Row tailor showing me some super 150s once. 'Perfect for fusing', he said :D
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#16 Measure Man

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 05:51 PM

This is how we have made our lower priced garments since the 1970's, when my father died and we cleared out his old clothes I was really surprised by how well they had kept their shape

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#17 Nishijin

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 08:18 PM

Is there such a thing as a camelhair canvas tape? Like a banrol or other waistband stiffener but not fusible?


No idea. I could be made by cutting strips of canvas. BTW, that's I how I make my waistband interlining, with a strip of chest canvas and a strip of linen canvas. I cut the strips myself, but it is also possible to have this made in some places.

I've seen rolls of waistband stiffener, but those were cuts on the bias in a kind of canvas very different from what I use (sometimes even synthetic fiber).


Also has anyone heard of a jacket construction that uses both a fusible and stitched-in canvas at the same time?


Half-canvased / semi-traditional : as explained by SG, the front is entirely fused, then a canvas is put in the chest and lapel area. The only difference with the standard fused construction (which has a "floating chest piece" as say the marketors) is that the chest piece has the underliying body canvas part that extends into the lapel, so that it can be padstitch in order to get a nice lapel roll.

Now, something different : today, some cloths are made with the fused construction in mind, and have a pretty bad behavior when they don't have fusing. If you have to work with those, you need to fuse at least the lapel facing and the topcollar. It is usually a good idea to fuse the whole front as well, and then later put in a traditionnal canvas.
It looks like it is a step more, but it actually saves a lot of time since fused cloth is way easier to handle than unfused one.

Fusing the front has a definite impact on confort, since the cloth will breathe much less, and feel stiffer. So I consider this should only be done for cloth that can't be worked without it. But I can understand why some low-price ranges would do it for all cloth, since it give confort for the tailor to work faster with a nicer-looking result.

For real bespoke work on quality cloth, this should not be necessary.

Pad-stitching the lapel by hand when you fuse the front is just a way to say you don't have the machine to do it (it is expensive). Making silk finishing by hand is a way to get a nicer look (for people who like hand stitches), it doesn't change the construction of the coat nor its confort. And if you want a swelled edge, either you do it by hand or you have the specific machine to do it.
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
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#18 ladhrann

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 10:37 PM

Thanks for all the replies. Its the combination of fusing i.e. labour-saving and intensive handwork which is a bit confusing, especially as it seems to be doubling the work in his case. There's also the possibility of a bit of confusion due to the language barrier and the fact that he hasn't made a jacket for me before, just trousers so I'm still feeling my way. I'll talk to him again and go over the construction with him.

Oddly enough I saw a Remus Uomo RTW jacket there with a fused front and with a wool/horsehair canvas, the 'cloth' was 100% polyester, why on earth would there be so much work put into such poor material? Anyway the game's afoot...




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