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Please translate Tailor jargon for thick skulled non-profi

Translation for a dummy

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#1 Naive Jr

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 06:02 AM

"The twelve ounce

plainweave

fabric

has

a more open

weave


giving it

a

drier

and more durable

handle."
Scribimus indocti doctique poemata passim

#2 Alievens

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 09:15 AM

There are 18 words in your text.

I presume you want clarification on one or more of the terms mentioned...

But I'm having a hard time guessing which part you are having trouble with, so please point us in the right direction and kindly tell us the words that need clarification.



#3 Naive Jr

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 09:23 AM

So:

Let's try: DRIER


Edited by Schneidergott, 19 April 2014 - 12:21 AM.

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#4 Naive Jr

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 09:32 AM

Kindly translate the meaning of <drier> - what on Earth is a dry handle?
Why does twelve ounce open weave mean drier handle?

Your humble Humus Homely


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#5 Alievens

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 09:50 AM

Oh that!

 

You'd really have to feel the cloth in order to understand.

Try touching a few samples of cloth or walk into a fabric store and you will know what it means right away...

 

good luck!



#6 Naive Jr

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 10:17 AM

Premise: handle means hand (thanks, Alievens!)

What does open weave have to do with dryness?

 


Edited by Schneidergott, 19 April 2014 - 12:23 AM.

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#7 Schneidergott

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 05:21 PM

As you can probably see, I have cleaned up this thread, deleting any comment I recognized as disrespectful and/ or useless.

It's tough to explain dry handle, since it is not an objective description. It has to be put in a context, in this case comparing the properties of cloths in terms of weave, weight and finish.
A cloth with an open (and often crisp) weave (key words are fresco and worsted) will feel drier, because it does not hold moisture like a densely woven and/ or milled cloth, like for example a heavy twill or a flannel.

In order to understand (or better feel) the differences you really need to touch cloth samples of each kind. Or go to a department store to touch and compare suits (or garments in general) made from aforementioned material (make sure they are made entirely of natural fibers).
For those who want to dive deeper into this matter I can only recommend to find books about textile terms and production, online or in your local library.



A few examples in German:

http://www.amazon.de...sl_4k4ny40ja8_b
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#8 OJD

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 08:29 AM

I like fabric reference by Humphries, it's a good read. But without hands-on experience it's impossible to get an understanding with fabrics.


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