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#37 Newbie

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 06:16 PM

So I tried my first couple of collars. I used a rather standard lightweight iron on a woodblock and tried some collars with the 160 Fusetop and a rather cheap 70/2 cotton shirting. The result was: A DISASTER. I fused for about 15 sec trying to apply as much pressure as I could reasonable mantain, but still it doesn't even need to be washed to create little bubbles and come off on certain areas. I have to admit I'm more and more inclined to invest in a heat press. So a couple of questions: Is there anything I have to consider purchasing a heat press and is there anything to consider fusing the collar? Overall I really like the rather crisp look of the collar and sewing is a little easier as well...


Edited by Newbie, 06 November 2019 - 06:53 PM.


#38 Dunc

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 09:52 PM

So a couple of questions: Is there anything I have to consider purchasing a heat press and is there anything to consider fusing the collar?

 

How do you mean? I'm using a pretty standard clamshell type press of the sort you can buy on eBay for sublimation printing... I fuse at around 175 degrees for 15 seconds, which seems to give pretty good results. Just make sure that there's no lint or loose threads on any of the fabric surfaces. I usually like to tack everything together with the iron just to be sure that it's not going to move when I close the press.

 

Be aware that they're pretty large and heavy bits of kit - mine is about 25kg, so you don't want to have to carry it very far when you get it delivered.

 

Oh, one thing - are you fusing dry? A lot of instructions for consumer-grade fusable talk about using a damp press cloth, but that doesn't seem to work with this stuff.



#39 Newbie

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 11:17 PM

 

How do you mean? I'm using a pretty standard clamshell type press of the sort you can buy on eBay for sublimation printing... I fuse at around 175 degrees for 15 seconds, which seems to give pretty good results. Just make sure that there's no lint or loose threads on any of the fabric surfaces. I usually like to tack everything together with the iron just to be sure that it's not going to move when I close the press.

 

Be aware that they're pretty large and heavy bits of kit - mine is about 25kg, so you don't want to have to carry it very far when you get it delivered.

 

Oh, one thing - are you fusing dry? A lot of instructions for consumer-grade fusable talk about using a damp press cloth, but that doesn't seem to work with this stuff.

 

Thanks Dunc, I didn't use any damp press cloth, I just laid the fabric with the interlining on a piece of wood and started ironing. Actually I wasn't sure beforehand if the collar holds after multiple washings, but was rather surprised that it won't even hold without ever washing it.

 

I was just asking if there are any specifics to be considered, meaning if you must be able to regulate the pressure or else. The heating presses I looked at were all too small to fit a collar stand inside so I figure you just can press it in two seperate steps.


Edited by Newbie, 06 November 2019 - 11:27 PM.


#40 peterle

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 07:55 PM

When fusing, be sure You don´t iron it on. You have to press it on step by step without moving the iron. I also think it would help to cover the wood with a piece of soft fabric so the iron gets good contact all over. You also shouldn´t move the finished piece before it got cool again.

I personally like to use sew in interfacing wich I fuse with an iron on interfacing. Gives a crisp collar without risking bubbles.


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#41 Dunc

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 08:42 PM

 

Thanks Dunc, I didn't use any damp press cloth, I just laid the fabric with the interlining on a piece of wood and started ironing. Actually I wasn't sure beforehand if the collar holds after multiple washings, but was rather surprised that it won't even hold without ever washing it.

 

I was just asking if there are any specifics to be considered, meaning if you must be able to regulate the pressure or else. The heating presses I looked at were all too small to fit a collar stand inside so I figure you just can press it in two seperate steps.

 

A 38 x 38 cm press is just big enough to do a typical collar stand diagonally, but yes, you can fuse larger pieces in multiple steps.

 

They normally have adjustable pressure, but no way to actually calibrate it - I have mine set to as high as I can comfortably operate.


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#42 Terri

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 10:48 PM

We have found that the press really gives a superior result.
Our work irons varied in temperature so some irons were hot but not hot enough and it was time consuming to try to apply enough pressure for long enough to get the stiff interfacings to bond properly.

I have also fused the interfacing to a non fusible interfacing, and installed that into collar and cuffs which eliminated any bubbling on the fashion fabric. Its a good solution as well.

Edited by Terri, 07 November 2019 - 10:50 PM.

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