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The Final Press


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#1 NW Tailor

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Posted 20 September 2010 - 05:03 AM

Can anyone please share with me their system or routine in how they do a final pressing on completed trousers? Please include iron type, what kind of pressing table you are using, any other implements that you are using on the finished product...
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#2 Schneidergott

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 04:20 AM

There are some variations in doing that, depending on the fabric and if you use an ironing table with suction or just a plain table with some cover.

Anyway, this is how I do it, others may do it differently.

I press the side- and inside leg seams first, along with the front pockets.
Then I place the trouser legs flat on the table, side seam and inside leg seam on top of each other, re-shaping the legs and sharpening the pleats of front and back trouser. Finally you give the front fly and the waistband a pressing. As a variation you could do the last step first.

That's pretty much it. The weight of the iron depends on your preferences, but I think it's best to use a heavier iron (at least 2 KG) with or without steam instead of a household iron. If you don't have a suction table, the irons with a steam boiler do produce too much moist.
I can and do use both types, I even have a 7,5KG steam iron. But unless you deal with a nasty Super 180's worsted or a 20oz. cloth, the regular gravity feed iron will do. For the delicate fabrics and colours use the teflon shoe and/or a pressing cloth.

Pressing tables: The usual ironing boards are too small to put the entire trouser on it and not sturdy enough. A former kitchen table is big and strong enough, just cover it with an old wool blanket and some old bed sheet on top.

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#3 NW Tailor

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 04:37 AM

There are some variations in doing that, depending on the fabric and if you use an ironing table with suction or just a plain table with some cover.


I have an ironing table with suction ~

But unless you deal with a nasty Super 180's worsted or a 20oz. cloth, the regular gravity feed iron will do. For the delicate fabrics and colours use the teflon shoe and/or a pressing cloth.


I'm using Italian wools, Super 140's ~ I'm working with six different colorways, and oddly enough there is ONE color that I'm having a horrible time pressing ~ which is what instigated this thread. I've been doing this for a really long time and have never had these kinds of pressing issues. Irons are gravity fed, and I do have two weights of irons for different styles of materials ~ have tried them both with no improvement. Always use a pressing cloth, moistened when necessary...

Edited by NW Tailor, 21 September 2010 - 04:37 AM.

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#4 Schneidergott

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 03:13 PM

Is it a dark colour or a light beige/ green?

Sometimes with delicate fabrics using the suction makes it worse and the inlays leave a mark on the outside.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
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#5 NW Tailor

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Posted 21 September 2010 - 11:15 PM

Is it a dark colour or a light beige/ green?

Sometimes with delicate fabrics using the suction makes it worse and the inlays leave a mark on the outside.


The fabric is a light steel grey ~ yes, getting horrible shadow marks from the inside, what looks like pull marks on all the seams, wrinkles in the oddest of places ~ amongst all of the fabrics I am using, all from the same vendor and style, I also have one lighter color and it's not showing any of these problems ~ I am now wondering if this particular piece of wool may have some odd looming or dye issues? Anyone ever have something like this happen?
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#6 Schneidergott

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Posted 22 September 2010 - 03:37 AM

Could it also (apart from a fabric problem you mentioned) be a transport or thread tension problem with your machine, or just the wrong needle or thread for that type of fabric?

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

 


#7 A TAILOR

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 05:47 AM

since you did not have problems with other colors of the same cloth, it could be just this one peice goods.
but sg has a good point about the needles.

#8 Schneidergott

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 07:01 AM

I think jcsprowls mentioned somewhere the differences in quality: Did you buy your fabrics as proper lengths from a decent supplier or could they have been end roll cuts (bargains)?

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
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#9 NW Tailor

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 10:12 AM

I think jcsprowls mentioned somewhere the differences in quality: Did you buy your fabrics as proper lengths from a decent supplier or could they have been end roll cuts (bargains)?


I had a visit from the A&E thread rep this week and talked to her about some of the issues ~ she suggested some other thread possibilities, so I'm going to do some testing before coming back to this colorway.

The wools are coming full bolt directly from the mill rep, so I'm confident that they are top quality ~ but I know that wools have so many variables, from the dye, to the weaving, to where the sheep was eating (just kidding, but you get my point...) so it's going to be hard to pin it down to just one specific cause. I've already changed needles multiple times and am not finding that to be an issue. Same with machine tension ~ have multiple lock stitch machines and bounced around testing each one with scraps but didn't see any real difference between them.

I have 4-6 weeks before having to face the solid grey again ~ hopefully I can figure out some answers before then.

It did occur to me that I haven't changed the pad on my suction table in quite some time ~ that might be causing some of the weird pressing issues, but if that were the case it would make sense that I'd see it on all colorways rather than just the solid grey.

I appreciate so much all of the suggestions ~ wish you were all right next door so I could get your first-hand impressions ~
"The quality of a person's life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence, regardless of their chosen field of endeavor."
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#10 greger

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 11:04 AM

Bought some thread once that melted under the iron like lava flow. That thread was certainly for a warm iron. Perhaps your thread is shrinking when pressing.

#11 A TAILOR

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 06:46 AM

Bought some thread once that melted under the iron like lava flow. That thread was certainly for a warm iron. Perhaps your thread is shrinking when pressing.



when nylon thread first came out we tried a spool.
we sewed on patch pockets on by hand. sewed one pocket pressed it and held it up to check it out. and the pocket fell on the floor.
silk is the best.

#12 greger

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 07:10 AM

That's funny. Now I know what to use for movie thread.

#13 Nishijin

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 02:20 AM

Nylon is highly sensitive to heat, and will melt with a moderately low heat. Nylon is also higly flamable, and though it has its uses in clothing (for some technical fabrics), I would not use it in custom making. It used to be a "space age" fiber, but it made its time a long time ago.

Many other man-made fibers do not have this same problem. Polyester thread should stand heat quite well. I hate to hand sew with polyester threads (or maybe I just never tried the good ones), but I discovered some times ago Mara, a polycoton thread, which is quite nice to the hand as well as to the machine. As I find Tre Cerchi coton thread quality pretty inequal, I think I will convert to Mara as my base sewing thread.

Of course, silk is the best. I must say though that in some occasions, I rather use Mara, which is way thinner than my finishing silks (Phenix or GŁtermann).
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#14 NW Tailor

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 08:28 AM

Polyester thread should stand heat quite well. I hate to hand sew with polyester threads (or maybe I just never tried the good ones), but I discovered some times ago Mara, a polycoton thread, which is quite nice to the hand as well as to the machine. As I find Tre Cerchi coton thread quality pretty inequal, I think I will convert to Mara as my base sewing thread.

Of course, silk is the best. I must say though that in some occasions, I rather use Mara, which is way thinner than my finishing silks (Phenix or GŁtermann).


Thank you for the suggestions ~ just ordered some silk thread and will see what happens next. Doing some research on the Mara, that will be my next experiment ~ These get worn so much more, and differently, than the norm ~ so must do some fit samples before using on actual product ~
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#15 Todd Hudson

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Posted 11 December 2010 - 08:15 AM

I recommend buying long staple silk from Utica Thread Company on the East Coast. It is machine twist silk Size A for seaming. Talk to Larry and tell him what you are making. He sells seaming thread for suitable for fine worsted. My seams are now flat and beautiful thanks to Larry. Also, he sells thin, long staple cotton for your overlock machine. It goes flat when pressing. Polyester overlock thread is awful even if it is Tex 21 it will not compress, leaves marks, starts getting fuzzy after a little wear and is rough against the skin compared to cotton. He also has a good selection of blindstitch thread in natural and synthetic fibers. My AE rep was very ignorant of good blindstitching thread. Call Larry at Utica. He supplies or used to supply suit factories in the US such as Oxxford and Hart Marx.

Uticathread.com used to work. I can't load it today though.

Are you using that old Singer? Make sure take up spring is fresh and the take up spring position and tension and correct. I would learn to do this yourself reading the mechanic section in back of Singer manual because you have to fine tune this based on different weights of cloth. The AE website was good for pointing out these tension issues for me related to problems sewing denim. However, I am not sure they really have good natural fiber thread for fine sewing.




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