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An Anglo-American Dictionary of Sartorial Terms


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#19 tailleuse

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 07:36 AM

An Anglo-American Dictionary of Sartorial Terms

As a result of the American influence on various clothing fora, I have noticed a tendency for even British posters to use Americanism like "tux" Posted Image . So for those of you wanting to stick to the Queen's English, here is a guide. The British English is on the left.

Ascot (cravat) = Ascot
Balmoral shoes/boots (galosh Oxfords) = balmoral shoes/boots with a balmoral seam
Bespoke = custom
Black lounge coat worn with striped trousers = stroller
Body coat = frock coat eg cutaway frock, Prince Albert frock
Bowler (Coke) hat = derby
Braces = suspenders
Coat/jacket = jacket
Co-respondent shoes = spectator shoes
Cravat (day cravat) = Ascot
Derbies = Bluchers
Dinner jacket = Tuxedo
Frock coat = Prince Albert coat/frock
Overcoat/coat = coat
Lounge coat/jacket = single (or double in modern usage) breasted jacket (traditional tailoring: sack coat/jacket)
Lounge coats/suits (as a category) = sack clothes (outdated) opposite of dress clothes
Lounge suit = single breasted business suit (traditional tailoring: sack suit)
Morning coat = cutaway coat or frock (Prince Albert coat in Victorian and Edwardian America)
Morning dress = morning dress
Knickers = panties
Oxford shoes/boots = Balmoral shoes/boots
Pick-and-pick (weave) = sharkskin
Plus twos/fours = knickerbockers, knickers
Pointed/double breasted/reefer lapels (less commonly 'peaked') = Peaked lapels
Pullover/jersey = sweater
Reefer jacket (military/nautical overcoat) = pea coat
Reefer jacket (tailoring term, civilian coat) (modern use: double breasted lounge coat) = double breasted sack coat (tailoring term), also a double breasted blazer
Sac coat/overcoat = a loose fitting square cut sack coat without waist suppression
Semi-dress = semi-formal
Sock suspenders = garters
Step lapels = notched lapels
Slipover = sweater vest
Trousers = pants (short for pantaloons)
Turn ups = cuffs
Vest (singlet) = undershirt
Waistcoat (vest in tailoring parlance) = vest
Woof (weft) = weft


Interesting list. I only recently figured out what a "body coat" was. I knew the terms "woof" and "weft," but didn't realize "woof" was an Anglo-English term. I haven't heard either term used recently in the U.S. Most people call it the "cross grain." The "warp" is referred to as the "length grain" or the "straight grain."

The associations that my American eyes and ears make upon encountering some of these terms:

"Semi-dress": "half-naked."

"Reefer jacket": A jacket in which you'd smoke marijuana. There was a notorious, anti-mj propaganda film made in the U.S. called "Reefer Madness.")

Posted Image



It was made in 1936. "Reefer" is now an obsolete term for marijuana in the U.S.

http://en.wikipedia..../Reefer_Madness


"Co-respondent shoes": Footwear worn by one named in a divorce suit.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#20 NJS

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 12:38 AM

'Co-respondent shoe' does indeed derive from the type of shoes that might be worn by a co-respondent to a divorce suit and is so recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary!
<b></b>NJS<b></b>

#21 culverwood

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 02:50 AM

I cannot see but it must be there:
Pants (underpants) = underwear (boxers, briefs)

Edited by culverwood, 05 January 2012 - 02:51 AM.


#22 tailleuse

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:58 PM

'Co-respondent shoe' does indeed derive from the type of shoes that might be worn by a co-respondent to a divorce suit and is so recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary!



Really? Posted Image

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#23 fxh

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:03 AM

I cannot see but it must be there:
Pants (underpants) = underwear (boxers, briefs)


I noticed a very up to date use of pants in UK to mean underwear. 08 January 2013. I had thought it was an older term.

Speaking at a Downing Street reception for London Collections: Men on Monday evening, The Prime Minister attempted to lance the boil of his past sartorial disasters.
.......
..He then ran through his tie-free outfit - from Oliver Sweeney shoes to Richard James suit - before adding: "and my pants are by Marks and Spencer - which might be in the too much information bracket."


From: http://fashion.teleg...st-fashion.html

And another one showing its not just used by one newspaper:

Cameron offered a breakdown of his outfit – a Richard James suit, Oliver Sweeney shoes and M&S pants – before confessing: "I know nothing about fashion. When I go shopping, my wife doesn't let me look around. I am put into the changing room and passed things."
http://www.guardian....ns-fashion-show

Australians would say: underwear or underpants or undies or slightly more slang "jocks" - from a brand of early briefs called Jockeys edit: It would also be from Jock Strap I suppose. A neat convergence of a few words and sources - as is so many derivations.

Edited by fxh, 24 January 2013 - 04:05 PM.


#24 ladhrann

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 06:53 AM


.......
..He then ran through his tie-free outfit - from Oliver Sweeney shoes to Richard James suit - before adding: "and my pants are by Marks and Spencer - which might be in the too much information bracket."


A terrible pity he wouldn't get them from Sunspel or John Smedley considering they make in the UK, given his pay bracket and background he can certainly afford them. Its something shirtmakers used to do as well.

Its used by a younger crowd than him as well, I remember horrifying an English acquaintance in his mid-20s a few years ago when on a short break saying I had only one pair of pants. I of course meant long trousers. Mind you he was from Tunbridge Wells so maybe that had a bearing on it.




#25 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 10:27 AM

Interesting list. I only recently figured out what a "body coat" was. I knew the terms "woof" and "weft," but didn't realize "woof" was an Anglo-English term. I haven't heard either term used recently in the U.S. Most people call it the "cross grain." The "warp" is referred to as the "length grain" or the "straight grain."

The associations that my American eyes and ears make upon encountering some of these terms:

"Semi-dress": "half-naked."

"Reefer jacket": A jacket in which you'd smoke marijuana. There was a notorious, anti-mj propaganda film made in the U.S. called "Reefer Madness.")

ReeferMadnessPoster.jpg



It was made in 1936. "Reefer" is now an obsolete term for marijuana in the U.S.

http://en.wikipedia..../Reefer_Madness


"Co-respondent shoes": Footwear worn by one named in a divorce suit.


I wonder if you have to spend your whole life understanding facts that were perfectly obvious all the time.

 

Doris Lessing - Shikasta


#26 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 10:32 AM

Tailleuse

 

"Reefer jacket": A jacket in which you'd smoke marijuana. There was a notorious, anti-mj propaganda film made in the U.S. called "Reefer Madness.")

 

I always thought that Reefer Madness was funded by Dupont in an effort to extinguish the natural fibre industry!

 

Conversely, I always assumed that the Macrame craze in the 70's was the result of imaginative marketing to use up all the unused natural fibre string and rope that was then left over. :hyper:


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I wonder if you have to spend your whole life understanding facts that were perfectly obvious all the time.

 

Doris Lessing - Shikasta


#27 shdavid

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 08:27 PM

And, many new words are added as time passes. Where do these new words come from? Culture, slang or what? :)


Edited by shdavid, 30 August 2017 - 04:16 PM.


#28 pfaff260

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 01:52 PM

0edcf8918425be19c0e98ceb2f1d1627c59c1fe6macrame is back to haunt us.


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#29 greger

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 05:14 PM

Did you make that? 


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#30 pfaff260

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 04:10 PM

Oh no, it's something you can buy on the net. I couldn't post a larger picture. I used to do macrame in the 70's, that's why i was so amazed by the fact its back.



#31 greger

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 10:26 AM

Macrame comes and goes. Dad was in the Navy and got a book for knot tying. It is an old book and it has macrame in it. Sailors have done it for hundreds if not thousands of years. Also find it in third world countries. America has its binges.


Edited by greger, 01 September 2017 - 10:31 AM.


#32 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 10:33 AM

Ha! :)


I wonder if you have to spend your whole life understanding facts that were perfectly obvious all the time.

 

Doris Lessing - Shikasta





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