Jump to content


Photo

"thread"


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Claire Shaeffer

Claire Shaeffer

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 189 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Palm Springs, CA USA
  • Interests:haute couture

Posted 27 March 2015 - 11:47 PM

I'm reading Tailoring: How to make and mend trousers, vests, and coats (1911) by Paul N. Hasluck published by Cassell and Co., Ltd, London. The author refers to "thread" as different from cotton and silk threads. 

 

Does anyone have an explanation of type thread he's referring to? 


Edited by Claire Shaeffer, 27 March 2015 - 11:48 PM.

Claire Shaeffer

Author, Couture Sewing Techniques

claire.shaeffer@gmail.com

www.sewfari.org


#2 SINNED

SINNED

    Umsie

  • Professional
  • Pip
  • 48 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buckinghamshire UK

Posted 28 March 2015 - 12:49 AM

Not sure, but if the book is 1911 then threads would all be natural fibres and cotton thread is not so strong as modern poyester cotton. Silk threads because they are monofilament have greater strength than cotton and smoother sewing but will rot with time. The reference to "thread" may just mean that sometimes a thicker thread is required for strength and it may just mean that.

If you are looking for advice about what to use today then I would suggest a more modern book.

#3 fronno

fronno

    Umsie

  • Professional
  • Pip
  • 23 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Interests:Sewing, designing, sewing, drawing, teaching

Posted 28 March 2015 - 01:16 AM

I have asked a friend of me at Coats for answer, the moment he has answered I will come back to you.

I do remember my grandmother using different kinds of threads and remembering her telling me something about the way different kinds of thread were spun and or twined in a different way. Anyway, the moment I know exactly I will come back to you.


Edited by fronno, 28 March 2015 - 01:17 AM.


#4 Claire Shaeffer

Claire Shaeffer

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 189 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Palm Springs, CA USA
  • Interests:haute couture

Posted 28 March 2015 - 02:26 AM

Sinned, I'm not looking for what thread to use today. I know what is currently available, what works best for me and my reader, and why; I'm interested in the hy of tailoring, techniques, and findings that have been used in the past. Specifically I'm looking for old tech. which have been forgotten.

 

Silk threads are not always monofilament, Cotton also rots when it's dried out. I see this often on museum garments. 

 

The "thread" described was used for sewing, sold in skeins, size #35. Silk is described separately and "may be obtained in various degrees of fineness." In another paragraph tailors' cottons range from "stout no. 24 to fine 40 on reels".

"...for strong seams, thread, not cotton, must be substituted for silk."

 

The quotes are directly from the book which is part of the "Work" handbook series. The book has very few diagrams, but the directions are good.

 

Fronno, it's possible that this is just a lightweight thread without a twist. I'll continue reading to see how it's used. 

 

 

Claire 


Claire Shaeffer

Author, Couture Sewing Techniques

claire.shaeffer@gmail.com

www.sewfari.org


#5 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 28 March 2015 - 06:03 AM

What about linen? Grandfather always used it for sewing on buttons because of its strength.
  • Schneiderfrei likes this

#6 MANSIE WAUCH

MANSIE WAUCH

    Pro

  • Professional
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 686 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North West, England

Posted 28 March 2015 - 06:24 AM

Are they not just referring to baisting cotton as in thread marking?



#7 posaune

posaune

    Pro

  • Super Pro
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 956 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Germany

Posted 28 March 2015 - 08:45 AM

Claire, if you found out for it was used- we will have a clue. Linen was used to sew on buttons. Yes, very strong material Greger but it is thick. You can buy it here in Germany as Sterngarn. So named because it has the form of a star.

http://www.handarbei...sterngarn.html#

Then there is Zwirn - special form of twisting

http://www.ruoss-kis...irn_Lexikon.htm

i do n ot know how to translate this.

lg

posaune.


  • tailleuse, cperry and Schneiderfrei like this

#8 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 28 March 2015 - 12:46 PM

Thank you Posaune. I think that is the only place I have seen real button thread for sell. Of course nowadays maybe some modern thread is better.

To finish the button thread poke it through and wrap it 1 1/4, poke it through and wrap it 1/2, poke it through and a quarter wrap, poke it through a last time and yank it so it snaps right where it comes out. It sorta explodes where it breaks. Never cut it. This is rather fast and efficient.

#9 SINNED

SINNED

    Umsie

  • Professional
  • Pip
  • 48 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buckinghamshire UK

Posted 28 March 2015 - 05:39 PM

Ah I see, sorry Claire I misunderstood. Well my money is on linen as the book virtually says it is not cotton or silk and so what else would they have had in those days. I believe linen is about 30% stronger than cotton so that also fits the description.
  • cperry likes this

#10 Claire Shaeffer

Claire Shaeffer

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 189 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Palm Springs, CA USA
  • Interests:haute couture

Posted 29 March 2015 - 08:19 AM

I'm still reading. The organization of the book is terrible so it's laborious. 

Linen used to come in several weights. I have several linen threads. Most are Tex 42 which is fine. This thread is labeled Texlen Horska Trutnov. They are in round boxes with a hole at the center of the top to pull the thread out. I have another brand in 2 wts. The labels might indicate 50 and 100 size which doesn't make since. They are different sizes.

 

Then I have some round disks with the thread wrapped around the edge. These are quite pretty. One is on the original card and probably came from Switzerland.

 

Linen thread was also used for buttonholes because it wears better. 

 

I'm travelling next week so I'll take my little book along. 

 

Yesterday I read how to twist the thread for sewing buttons. This was interesting and involved a double strand which you held the ends in your mouth, twisted it, ten waxed it/ For coat buttons, he used 4 strands. 

C


Claire Shaeffer

Author, Couture Sewing Techniques

claire.shaeffer@gmail.com

www.sewfari.org


#11 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 29 March 2015 - 09:30 AM

"Linen thread was also used for buttonholes because it wears better."

What linen would you use for this?
Sounds useful for jeans and other machine washings type clothes.

#12 Claire Shaeffer

Claire Shaeffer

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 189 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Palm Springs, CA USA
  • Interests:haute couture

Posted 31 March 2015 - 10:21 AM

2 bits

Andrew sent me a private email since he can't post here. His info was that thread stockings (18th c.) were linen. Wool stockings were called worsted or woolen.

 

Gregor, I don't know what size linen is used for buttonholes. I'll put this on my to check list when I go to London. 

 

In the meantime, I've left my pups at home to be spoiled by my friend who moved in; and I'm off to visit a friend who has a fabric store in Armidale, Au. Sadly, I won't be in Sydney except for overnight on my return. 

 

I didn't bring the tailoring book. I'm a bit overweight already so I'm reading a Chanel book on my IPAD.


  • cperry likes this

Claire Shaeffer

Author, Couture Sewing Techniques

claire.shaeffer@gmail.com

www.sewfari.org


#13 J. Maclochlainn

J. Maclochlainn

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,126 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 31 March 2015 - 02:44 PM

Claire, you're correct. "Thread" is linen. I checked all my sources and not one gives a specific size but all agree linen was used to sew on buttons, "where stong sewing is required" and to reinforce button holes.
  • tailleuse, cperry and Schneiderfrei like this
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#14 Katherine Maylin

Katherine Maylin

    Umsie

  • Professional
  • Pip
  • 23 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Bedfordshire, England
  • Interests:Tailoring

Posted 31 March 2015 - 05:21 PM

Yes, another nomination for linen here. When I was learning the trade, thread was always linen; came on a skein and was not machine silk, hand silk, buttonhole twist, basting cotton etc. I'm not that old BTW!
  • tailleuse, cperry and Schneiderfrei like this

#15 Claire Shaeffer

Claire Shaeffer

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 189 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Palm Springs, CA USA
  • Interests:haute couture

Posted 02 April 2015 - 07:52 AM

Katherine, this is one of several Eng. tailoring books I have so my thought is that it might have been used in the UK longer. I might add that since much of tailoring was and is taught by older tailors, "thread" might have been used longer in speaking but not in texts. Thanks for your input. C


Claire Shaeffer

Author, Couture Sewing Techniques

claire.shaeffer@gmail.com

www.sewfari.org





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users