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Jeans, how to make it


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#1 gatto

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 05:21 PM

I have a question for you, members.

 

I am a shirtmaker, in Milano, with my own shop, selling bespoke shirts (cutted by me) and other ready made goods.

Now I would like to start to sell bespoke jeans. 

That's because denim could be a very interesting fabric (I did sell fabric before opening my shop).Selvedge denim, unsanforized, that need to be washed, and used day by day,  produced in USA or Japan, with old shuttle looms, for me have the same charm of an old Scottish tweed.

And also jeans could be an interesting product, if made with old sewing machines and as an artisan product.

On the web I did find videos about people  that make jeans using old machines, trying to preserve a job and a product that have an history.

Here are some exemple:

Roy denim (USA)

Hartford Denim Company (USA): 

Companion denim (spanish): 

Mike Hodis (USA): 

Cone Mills (USA):  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rfhhNiV_SA

Momotrao jeans:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=csPL3WQrLRM

 

Here are the questions, before to start speaking  about drafts, fittings, etc. I would like to know, which could be the best machines to make it.

I know about Reece for keyholes (I have a Reece 104  that I use for shirt button holes), and Union Special 43200g for hem (too expensive for me at this stage). 

 

My question is: it is possible to make a jeans with a single needle lockstich (I have an industrial Pfaff 563), or is better make it with a chainstich machine, and in this case, which is the more usefull machine, the indispensable one ?

Why is better chainstich then lockstich ?

Single needle or two needls ?

 

I could buy (from a friend) a Singer 261-13 two needls chainstich feed of the arm,  and I  have an industrial overlock (Rimoldi 128).

 

Which machine is used for belt loops ?

Which should I buy ?

 

Thanks in advance for all your advices, and sorry for my English !

 

Gatto

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#2 greger

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Posted 05 May 2015 - 06:45 AM

When buying clothes I avoid chainstitch and double needle. Take out some machined buttonholes and put in hand made. Overlock is fine some places. Part of the jeans look is flat felled seams. When making up the front pockets I press using a ham to get the best curve.

#3 gatto

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Posted 06 May 2015 - 12:11 AM

Greger, thank you very much for your advices!

 

But, I have just spoken with the tailor tham make hem, etc to suits I sell ready made

.

He told me that, on classic trousers, the  single needle lockstich sew, for exemple on seat, where the two back parts are sewn toghether, if you do not make it in a certain way (keeping the fabric tight with right and left hands) tend to break.

My question is:  considering this problem, it is not easyier and safer make it with double chainstich, using a feed of the arm sewing machine ?

 

Thanks and regards,

Gatto



#4 dpcoffin

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Posted 06 May 2015 - 03:53 AM

The current fashion for all garments in which unwashed selvedge denim is the preferred fabric is definitely to use, and to feature prominently, double or triple needle chain stitching on edges folded by a feed off the arm machine. Even the hems of jeans are preferred to be chain-stitched these days, in keeping with the classic practice of 20th-century US jeans manufacturers. Search for denim, jeans, and worker wear at Pinterest for many examples. Greger's approach, not surprisingly, is that of a tailor wishing to upgrade the factory approach with the standards and skills of his own craft, which takes the garment in a completely different direction.

 

So I'd ask: Who is your target audience, those who admire custom-tailor's finishing, or the current fashion?

 

Or, what sort of production methods do you want to explore, custom tailoring, or classic factory?


Edited by dpcoffin, 06 May 2015 - 04:00 AM.


#5 greger

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Posted 06 May 2015 - 06:53 AM

T'was thinking of the chain stitch as single thread, so no bobbin. These can unravel.

Two thread chain stitch, or whatever they call it, is different. The under thread looks loopy, and is maybe used most places, including flat felled seams of the jeans I'm looking at. This method certainly uses more thread, but if the threads don't break, then that is good. (loopy machine)

Lock stitch is used quite a bit.

One needle overcast.

Three needle overcast is used for attaching facing to pocketing (seems over kill).

Belt loops looks like double needle with single bobbin. The bobbin side is zigzag.

Machine for attaching belt loops.

Buttonholer.

Machines for each. Is that 8 sewing machines?

Maybe I should buy a loopy machine and get rid of the lock stitch. Maybe the loopy is overcaster using one needle with top and under thread. It is even used to sew the waistband on.

#6 gatto

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Posted 06 May 2015 - 05:24 PM

dpcoffin and greger, thank you very much for your kind replies !

 

I did start this  topic, to understand how this product, which is tipical of your Country, should be made.

I do not like, and I am not able to afford the cost of factory production. 

To be honest, my customers rarely or never  asked  for bespoke jeans. 

I like products made how it should be, in the best way !

To let you understand, regarding the shirts I make, I allways wash the fabric before cutting, I usually boil the interlining I use (non fusible) to avoid shrinkage, the seam of shirt body and sleaves are single needle done and then redone (I do not know how to say in English,  in Italian we say: cuciture ribattute). I only use Australian mother of pearl buttons , at least 3 mm thickness, and the shirts are Ironed with dry iron.

I did start to think about jeans, because I start to offer shirts made with chambray and denim fabrics buoght from Japan (selvedge fabrics made with shuttle looms). Customers that bought  these shirts, came back and bought the same two or three times.

So, I thought: if I would be able to offer a proper jeans, made how used to be done by the American tailors, maybe they start to bought it.

And also because I like to learn about product, and I like sewing machines.

 

Italy, for what I know, is not a big market for tailor made jeans. Customers buy  factory made jeans, often with fabric pre washed or stone washed that looks like has been used by someone else.

But maybe, if I try to explain the things (fabric, seams, etc) that make a jeans  a real  jeans, to my customers, that normally make all bespoke , maybe, I was saying, they start to buy also this.


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#7 greger

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Posted 07 May 2015 - 06:14 AM

http://lsco.s3.amazo...y-of-denim2.jpg

The rivets made the difference. They weren't called jeans until the 1960s. They were called overalls before.

http://www.levistrauss.com/our-story/

Jeans have gone through many fads by many companies. An extra touch could be the bottom of the belt loops formed into an arrow head shape. Or, Western front pockets. Leg shapes are many. In the late 60s 2-3 boys (middle school) undid the outer seam to the knee and put in a big wedge of colored cloth; when they walked you saw it, and standing it was out of sight.

For me jeans have a few details. All the other parts of jeans is the flow of society or peer groups or work.
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#8 gatto

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Posted 07 May 2015 - 04:40 PM

Greger, thank you for the links you gave me and for your comments !

Very interesting for me.

 

Has been told to me (thank you !) about a mistake on the title of this topic.

 

A question for the Admin of the forum: could you please change it in "jeans, how to make them"

I tryed to do it myself without success. 

 

gatto


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#9 greger

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 06:24 AM

The title is good as is because it also includes the business side of making jeans.




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