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Preparing Tartan Fabric

Anderson & Sheppard Cloth Preparation Tartan Plaid

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#19 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 06:58 AM

One of my thoughts at the outset was why does one layer have lumps and extra fabric  This shouldn't happen in the weaving; and if it does, it would have been corrected before it was sent to A-S.

 

In HC, the width of the seam allowances are not necessarily even since you don't match the cut edges. Also, some seams have a wider seam allowance on one side than the other, but that's true in bespoke tailoring  as well.  

 

Cutting the sections in a single layer doesn't take longer than matching and pinning a double layer. It's probably what you are used to that works best. 


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#20 Henry Hall

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 08:22 AM

Well Shirtmaven said that cloth is often bowed. Must happen when it is rolled.


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#21 Terri

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 09:14 AM

I was cutting a beautiful herringbone with a windowpane over check today.
For the record, it started life as a lovely chestnut colour, but the designer had it dyed. The dyer is very careful but it has been in hot water then hung to dry, before it came back to us for pressing.
Even with the most careful pressing, the weave can get a bit wonky.
I lay the fabric out on the double then get the top layer aligned by use of a yardstick and push pins and a square. Only then do I chalk out the pattern. When I cut, I only cut the top layer. Once it is cut, I pin it to the under layer, matching the woven pattern. Sometimes the underside is a bit off, sometimes it seems the top side is. Once it is pinned. I cut the second layer and then block the two pieces using my square and the yardstick at the ironing board. If I really worried, I lay my pattern out again to check, but if I start with the top layer square and true it is usually fine.
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#22 lngn2

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Posted 05 July 2016 - 03:47 PM

On the subject of shrinking - I have been trying to understand how pattern matching can work on tartan trousers if they're shaped (shrunk, stretched) as detailed elsewhere on the forum? Does one do all the shaping on the outside (crease) of the piece instead of touching the seam side? Or is less shaping used as a compromise?

#23 Henry Hall

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Posted 05 July 2016 - 07:38 PM

The ones that were featured on here had no side seam. 


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#24 lngn2

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 04:12 AM

D'oh. I should have notice that...

#25 tailleuse

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 07:18 AM

 

The patterns I wrote about were prepared by bespoke tailors trained in Italy ...  If you have seen the documentary "Men of the Cloth," that's the style. 

 

Here's an old New York Times article describing one of the teachers I had, Joseph Gresia.  I've also been taught by his former partner, Benedetto Alibrandi (name misspelled in the story).

 

Tailor Fears Future Of Craft Is Limited

"SEVEN years of apprenticeship, starting at age 11, was how Joseph Gresia honed his tailoring skills in Italy.

Mr. Gresia would go to the tailor's shop in his hometown, Potenza, every day after school at 1 and work until 8 P.M., without pay. Fifty years ago such arrangements were the norm, Mr. Gresia said. ''You were trained by a master tailor who took the time to teach you everything he knew,'' he said. 'It was a fair exchange.' "

...

'''[Students in the full-time menswear program]  don't want to become tailors,' he said. 'Students in continuing education classes are different.  They are upgrading their skills to get ahead.' "

 

I wasn't one, but there have always been people with significant professional experience. We were not learning methods that were radically different from a professional setting, although obviously every tailor, every house, has different requirements.  And no matter the background, no one shows up for a class at 8 a.m. on a Saturday for 15 weeks without a serious interest.  Some people came in from Philadelphia and Connecticut.

 

http://www.nytimes.c...?pagewanted=all


Edited by tailleuse, 13 July 2016 - 07:19 AM.

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#26 lngn2

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 03:25 AM

There's another post on tartan trousers up now (though I don't think they're the same ones despite similar fabric) - http://www.anderson-...sed-side-seams/. Are these raised seams what one sees on Jeans and what I thought were called felled seams?

#27 Henry Hall

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 09:14 AM

They're different from jeans seams because they're not enclosed. The allowances lie one on top of the other (as he was shown pressing them). It seems to me to be a bit like those false flat-felled seams you see on some shirts, where the allowances are overlocked together, pressed to one side and stitched down; though it was only 3/8 of an inch on those tartan trousers.


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#28 tailleuse

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Posted 05 September 2016 - 06:06 AM

Laying out is different in bespoke tailoring and haute couture. 

 

In bespoke, the fabric is cut on the double with right sides together and the fabric is marked with a 1/4" seam allowance. 

 

 

I was talking to the Master Tailor for a very famous luxury menswear brand. He uses bespoke methods, but not Savile Row.  He starts with varying seam allowances all of which are larger than 1/4"  As I've said before, different tailors use different methods. 


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