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The Best and Worst of NOW


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#1 Sator

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 02:37 PM

The forum is full to the brim with fashions from yesterday but there isn't enough discussing what is happening today in the world of tailored clothing for women. So I thought I'd start a thread that looks around.

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From: http://ri4uks.tumblr...ost/10351367776

White DB coat with SB lapels, black facings and covered buttons. Black-and-white print shirt.

It's funny women are worried about whether their clothes look slimming. Wearing a DB jacket open makes it look boxy and - yes, it makes it less slimming! But the colour scheme is nice and harmonious. Some of the creases around the bust may be a symptom of it fitting the bust shape poorly.

From Elle, covering NY Fashion Week:

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You see a lot of this sort of business of throwing jackets over the shoulders like a cape. Unfortunately, I fear that it is mostly a way of trying to disguise the fact that the coat fits like a cape too! The shorts, coat, sun-glass frames, and hair colour are all harmonious, with a white blouse giving a bit of contrast.

The next one is also from Elle at NYFW:

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Nice colour, a vibrant red coat with a stand and fall collar. But the fronts look saggy and haggard to me. It looks like it just came out of the washing machine. These fronts need a bit more structure in them to keep them clean. However, structure = time consuming to make = more expensive = accountant doesn't like it = factory gets told to do it the cheaper way. But I guess Elle careth not!

#2 Sator

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 03:11 PM

One of the thing that I notice since from the 1980s, is just how much draped looking styles are popular. These look like they have been made by roughly throwing a piece of cloth over a dummy and pinning it a bit. It looks like it has been nonchalantly thrown together to give the garment a kind a freehand, casual look. The other modern trend in RTW is the heavily pleated look. The pleats are presented to look like a decorative fashion feature.

These two things have two points in common: the garment can be worn by a larger variety of figure types. If the hips are wide, the pleats open up like an accordion to accommodate. The drapey pleats on the blouse or skirt don't need to trace the figure.

This is typical:

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She gets away with it because she has model looks, and the main focus of interest here is more on her long hair, and her long pins rather than her clothes. But look carefully:

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1. The top is loose and baggy. It's probably sized S, M, L.
2. The bow is the only thing that gives it shape and fit
3. The pleats on the skirt are as generous as the folds on the Michelin man

Women who have wider hips know to avoid skirts like this, as it just accentuates the problem, but this model can get away with it.

Compare that with this Balenciaga haute couture coat. It too isn't meant to be tightly fitted. It is deliberately loose and easy. However, look how clean it is all over without any folds, rumples or creases being passed as artist happy accidents:

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If you look carefully at most fashion photo shoots or runway styles, the clothes tend to have the same rumpled, drapey and pleated t-shirt look to them. The main interest, is not in the clothes at all but rather in the pretty model, her hairstyle and accessories such as scarves, jewellery. It's a bit of a smoke and mirror's trick to distract you from the sameness of the actual clothes. And the millions fall for it!

#3 Sator

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 04:07 PM

Also from Elle:

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Notice the excellent pattern matching at the sleeves, and through the front panels as well as the facings.

#4 CoronarJunkee

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 05:35 PM

One of the thing that I notice since from the 1980s, is just how much draped looking styles are popular. These look like they have been made by roughly throwing a piece of cloth over a dummy and pinning it a bit. It looks like it has been nonchalantly thrown together to give the garment a kind a freehand, casual look. The other modern trend in RTW is the heavily pleated look. The pleats are presented to look like a decorative fashion feature.

These two things have two points in common: the garment can be worn by a larger variety of figure types. If the hips are wide, the pleats open up like an accordion to accommodate. The drapey pleats on the blouse or skirt don't need to trace the figure.

This is typical:

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http://i201.photobuc...eyFeminine1.jpg

Compare that with this Balenciaga haute couture coat. It too isn't meant to be tightly fitted. It is deliberately loose and easy. However, look how clean it is all over without any folds, rumples or creases being passed as artist happy accidents:

Posted Image

If you look carefully at most fashion photo shoots or runway styles, the clothes tend to have the same rumpled, drapey and pleated t-shirt look to them. The main interest, is not in the clothes at all but rather in the pretty model, her hairstyle and accessories such as scarves, jewellery. It's a bit of a smoke and mirror's trick to distract you from the sameness of the actual clothes. And the millions fall for it!



What the heck is this about...
It's like comparing a summer shirt to a structured lounge coat...

Look at this Balenciaga coat! Only someone with a model type body Nobody can get away with this!
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Or these dresses
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They are Balenciaga as well...

It's fashion. That's what happens out there. Some trends do stick, some don't, some can be worn by many figures, some can't.
The New Look looks bad on a woman with a big stomach and relatively small breasts, a pencil skirt doesn't look very good on a good amount of figures... Everyone just has to find what he likes and what works. If someone likes loose, drapy and unstructured, why shouldn't they have the possibility to choose?

Besides that, it's not the first time, this kind of thing happens in fashion history:

1970s
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1930s (Madeleine Vionnet)
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Chemise dress/late 18th century
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#5 tailleuse

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:32 PM

As for the "smoke and mirrors," grown women who've had their share of bad shopping experiences know the score. But it's so difficult to find clothes that fit or are alterable, they let themselves be taken in by the fantasy. Otherwise, they'd go nuts.

---


I think the styling of the red coat (it looks orange to me on my monitor, and I hate orange) is intended to appeal to young women who might find the garment stuffy or old-fashioned or difficult. Roll up the sleeves, sleep in it, throw it in the washing machine, make it your own! I don't mind the roughness at all. Fully pressed, the jacket might make the model look like a parody coachman or jockey. If the model were supposed to be a lawyer or other business professional in a tailored suit I would expect polish. But finding women who look like they have important jobs in the real world in a fashion magazine is about as common as finding unicorns. Strike that, unicorns are actually far more common.Posted ImagePosted Image

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#6 tailleuse

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:39 PM

Pear-shaped women, and I've read that the average American woman is pear-shaped, are instructed to attract more attention to their upper body, which is why some women would wear a DB jacket open. The magazine probably was afraid that the model would look like a doorman with the jacket buttoned up. I'm not crazy about the white jacket and black skirt, but that's just me. I once had an outfit something like that, but it was entirely in navy and the filmy skirt was knee length.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#7 Sator

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 12:22 AM

What the heck is this about...
It's like comparing a summer shirt to a structured lounge coat...

Look at this Balenciaga coat! Only someone with a model type body Nobody can get away with this!


Why do you think I deliberately chose this? :p

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Notice that is an extremely loose hanging box coat? It has no waist suppression at all!!!!

Yet it looks perfectly clean.

Deliberately loose hanging garments present fitting problems of their own not present on closely fitted garments. It can be very challenging to present all of the drape or pleats to look neat, even and clean rather than a dog's breakfast.

And you wanted a summer style that is beautifully fitted for comparison? Here you go:

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#8 Sator

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 12:32 AM

The magazine probably was afraid that the model would look like a doorman with the jacket buttoned up. I'm not crazy about the white jacket and black skirt, but that's just me.


This is "street fashion" and isn't something made up for the magazine. However, this was posted around the time the NYFW or something similar was on, so it could have been someone from the fashion industry that the Elle photographers spotted.

As for the "smoke and mirrors," grown women who've had their share of bad shopping experiences know the score.


About the smoke and mirrors tricks in the RTW garment cutting trade, I noticed it first when an ex-GF of mine asked me why most garments had these Michelin man like accordion pleats in them. She used to call them "balloons", and she hated them with a passion (she rightly thought that they made her waistline look bigger). They are usually presented so as to pass them off as a fashion feature but in most cases they are there to make them wearable to a largely variety of shapes and figures. As for this thing, she would have spewed when she saw it:

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I can almost hear her now "it makes me look a hippopotamus" blah blah LOL!

#9 Sator

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 12:59 AM

Fresh off the runway at Milan Fashion Week:

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By Jil Sander.

#10 posaune

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 01:46 AM

Ups!

lg
posaune

#11 tailleuse

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 02:13 AM

This is "street fashion" and isn't something made up for the magazine. However, this was posted around the time the NYFW or something similar was on, so it could have been someone from the fashion industry that the Elle photographers spotted.


Models, pretty fashion industry people. Same difference. Posted Image I used to like sites like The Sartorialist when it featured more real people. Now they have a lot of coverage of off-duty models and professional fashionistas. They are a different order of being from the ordinary woman. I gave up the regular reading of fashon magazines long ago -- waste of time. And that was even before I learned how the stylists pin the clothes on the models to improve the fit and the liberal use of PhotoShop.


About the smoke and mirrors tricks in the RTW garment cutting trade, I noticed it first when an ex-GF of mine asked me why most garments had these Michelin man like accordion pleats in them. She used to call them "balloons", and she hated them with a passion (she rightly thought that they made her waistline look bigger). They are usually presented so as to pass them off as a fashion feature but in most cases they are there to make them wearable to a largely variety of shapes and figures. As for this thing, she would have spewed when she saw it:

Posted Image

I almost hear her now "it makes me look a hippopotamus" blah blah.


Gorgeous fabric and color. Of course I would want/need to remove everything that rendered it "fashion." :-) At times. as someone who has made a concerted effort to learn sophisticated sewing techniques I feel guilty that I don't respond to a lot of fashion. Yes, who the hell would be able to wear that and not look like something out of a Victorian melodrama? A very young, very tall, very beautiful woman who has an ironic intelligence and a great deal of money, that's who.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#12 tailleuse

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 02:15 AM

Fresh off the runway at Milan Fashion Week:

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By Jil Sander.


I like the jacket. Uh....is there something wrong with it? Posted Image It's a little hard to read in the photo, but it has those extended front darts, right?

You have to understand that as a woman who has always had trouble finding RTW that fits, my eyes immediately glaze over wrinkles and fitting issues. I don't see them. If it doesn't fit a young, beautiful, highly primped model, what's it going to look like on me? (Not that I can afford Jil Sander.)


Edited by tailleuse, 26 September 2011 - 02:18 AM.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#13 Sator

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 02:23 AM

The coat is cut with a second diagonal dart coming from underneath the arm.

Also, it has likely been pre-altered in time for the show. It is even possible that a bespoke garment was made for the show, although that is probably less likely.

#14 tailleuse

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 02:55 AM

The coat is cut with a second diagonal dart coming from underneath the arm.

Also, it has likely been pre-altered in time for the show. It is even possible that a bespoke garment was made for the show, although that is probably less likely.


Thanks. Posted Image

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#15 tailleuse

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 03:05 AM

Here's the Ralph Lauren Fall 2011 style guide for women. It helps to be an under-30 preppie/European goddess to do these clothes justice, but boy, are they gorgeous.




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Edited by tailleuse, 26 September 2011 - 03:07 AM.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#16 ct3d

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 03:36 PM

I like the jacket. Uh....is there something wrong with it?

What I find wrong is the amount of wrinkles starting at both shoulders and going down the arm. She is holding the arms in a relaxed manner, so I don't think those wrinkles should be there. I think they look terrible. What do the experts say?

Also, are those wrinkles coming down at least on her left shoulder (probably on her right, too - different lighting) normal?
Same for the wrinkles/shadows from the diagonal dart to the vertical bust dart?

#17 dkst

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 04:19 PM

I agree the white coat is terrible. Unless it was a fashion show for the latest trends in lab coats. Maybe she's a phlebotomist about to draw some blood.

I think part of the problem is the flimsy bed sheet material it's made out of. And the sleeves are very poor, you can see some sort of sleeve head in the left sleeve which is visible and not doing it's job.

#18 Sator

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 04:35 PM

:) The white coat is one of the better fitting examples I could find. Most runway examples were much worse than that, and this one came as a pleasant surprise compared to others I saw.

Yes, it isn't really made of tailoring weight cloth and you can certainly see the sleeve head reinforcement straight through the cloth. The sleeves are twisting, and the forearm seam is perhaps too visible (difficult to avoid on a cloth you can't do ironwork on). The second diagonal bust dart is causing a few distortions - notice the diagonal drag lines (the dart is probably to wide and the drags represent oversuppression of a fish style dart for those who are interested in technical things):

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By experimenting with other ways of darting the fronts, the cutter could have achieved a better result than that, but had probably been given a difficult choice of cloth by the stylist in charge with too little time to run enough test garments. I also suspect that the pressures of modern life got the better of the garment and it was rushed through to production phase. I doubt it's easy getting a collection out in time for a NY or Milan show.




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