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#1 Jack Schmidling

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 03:52 PM

I have made a dozen or so shirts, mostly from my home grown, home spun and home woven fabric.

 

I found  putting plackets on the cuffs rather tedious so I switched to woven cuffs on the most recent ones.   This is a simple expedient but not quite as neat as the placket style.

 

I am making one now and decided to go back  to  the placket.  About the time I finished the plackets and got one sleeve sewn on, I happened to notice that the shirt I am wearing has no plackets at all.  It's an LL Bean shirt that some one gave to me.

 

The slit is  simply hemmed on both sides.  A few pleats and the cuff and button finishes the job.

 

I see nothing objectionable about this very simple approach and spent the past hour searching the net for the purpose the placket serves and can find nothing other than that it is the fashion.

 

Surely there is a better reason for all the bother?  Unless someone can provide a better reason, I think I  will try it on my next shirt.

 

I am retired and not much concerned about fashion.

 

Thanks,

 

    Jack http://schmidling.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#2 posaune

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 04:58 PM

This sewing is often done in Ladies wear.It is much quicker to sew. But you have then a gape in the fabric pattern.
It is not as neat, clean, and durable as a placket in my opion.
I can't imagine to roll up the sleeve with such a style.
I do it with silk chiffon (or a fabric like this) and when the style should be more feminin.
There is another way to treat the slit. You cut the slit and you roll or fold the cut ends and sew them down.
You secure the end with a little sewn triangle.
posaune
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#3 dpcoffin

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 07:34 PM

As far as I use the term "placket", which may not be typical but makes complete sense to me as a maker of such things, the term only applies to layers that are purposely added over the entire length of a slash, slit or some similar linear but partial opening, such as at cuff ends or the neckline, in order that one entire side of the opening can entirely overlap the other side. If the slit doesn't need—for protection, strength, modesty, fashion/preference, tradition, etc.—to overlap at all or only partially, it can be finished in lots of other ways, such as by hemming, rolling, binding, facing, sealing, etc., in none of which cases would I call the structure a placket, but simply a finished/faced slit/slash, etc. IOW, the term means, to me, a structure whose function is overlapping over the entire length of an opening it's applied to, and so its purpose is already part of its definition, like the purpose of a road (a defined area for traveling, rather than staying put) is part of the meaning of that term.


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#4 Terri

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 09:03 PM

Period shirts often had the opening in the sleeve on the underarm seam itself. The seam allowances are just turned in on themselves and stitched down. Pleat the wrist in add a cuff. Done.
The underarm position of the opening can feel a bit awkward, because we are used to a more modern placement on the back of the sleeve.
The position of the opening on the back area of the sleeve necessitates a slit and a way of finishing the opening and, as mentioned above, there are many ways of finishing the slit/ making a placket.
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#5 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 10:09 PM

The placket tends to keep the join flat and it provides a wider surface to contain a buttonhole and button to keep it from gaping.

 

In the case of french cuffs it is necessary to fold the underside placket inside the seam, so that the two sides line up to maintain flatness.

 

I have typically made plackets that are close to 3/4 inch.  Recently, following Rundschau practice, my latest plackets are 1 cm for the under part and 1.2 cm for the over. they are only a bit more fiddly and look very neat.

 

There seems to be controversy about whether the placket is made of one piece of stuff or two.  I much prefer a single piece, why bother to cut out two pieces?  I expect it simply depends on which way you learned first.

 

I would like to know what you mean by woven cuffs?


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 20 April 2017 - 10:13 PM.

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#6 Jack Schmidling

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 11:38 PM


 

I would like to know what you mean by woven cuffs?

 

Sorry, wrong term.

 

I meant to say, knitted.

 

I run a few inches off my antique sock machine of the same yarn and stitch the raw end to the cuff end of the shirt.

 

Using the ribber, it makes a very nice cuff but the seam is a bit bulky on my heavy fabric.

 

Thanks for all the comments,

 

Jack


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#7 dpcoffin

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 02:27 AM

 

There seems to be controversy about whether the placket is made of one piece of stuff or two.  I much prefer a single piece, why bother to cut out two pieces?  I expect it simply depends on which way you learned first.

 

 

 

I wouldn't call this a controversy (have I missed that fight?), but neither would I relegate it to the where-one-learned-it irrelevance of, say, toe-may-toe vs. toe-motto. There are at least a few in-arguable reasons for using two pieces rather than one, such as wanting different fabrics or grain arrangements for the underlap and overlap, but baring those, it seems arguable that cutting two plain old rectangular strips (each perhaps twice as long as needed if you're making sleeve plackets) from available scraps is considerably less bother compared to making a pattern for, finding layout space for, and then cutting out and marking up a non-rectangular single piece. Though that's typically my preference as well, in part no doubt because I learned to do it that way, but also because it feels less fiddly managing a single piece and because I already know how to match stripes and plaids on the overlap part of any one-piece pattern, and I'm too lazy to figure out how to do that without a pattern, tho intuition suggests this is probably even easier once you know how!


Edited by dpcoffin, 21 April 2017 - 02:29 AM.

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#8 dpcoffin

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 02:29 AM

 

I meant to say, knitted.

 

 

 

Thanks for clearing up THAT puzzler!


Edited by dpcoffin, 21 April 2017 - 02:30 AM.


#9 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 02:38 AM

That, of course, depends entirely upon how one pronounces Motto: :)


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