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tailoring shirt

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#1 vilure

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 02:58 AM

I'm learning to tailor my shirts. From all i googled, i picked side seams method as it is easy and looks good.
Usually side seam on my shirt looks like this:

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But i also have wrangler shirt and i guess it tailored, cause its seam flat, but still looks nice:

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When i sewing side seam it looks wavy:

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How can i make it straight and flat like the wrangler's shirt?

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Another question - how to deal with armpit, should i just stitch over it with same fabric width?

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That`s what i did, but what if i need to tailor only sleeves or body, how to start/end seam at armpit?

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And one more question how should i and seam at cuffs - sleeve becomes slimmer, but the cuff still wide:

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#2 lngn2

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 05:08 AM

Have you basted the seams before sewing?
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#3 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 09:36 AM

It looks as though you could spend more time smoothing the under-fold before you finish off the seam, and yes baste the seam, I do that for complex shapes.

 

The seam at the cuff is supposed to have pleats.  You must be careful about where the pleats go and which direction they face.

 

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#4 lepus

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 11:00 AM

The seam in picture 3 doesn't look good, there seems to be extensive puckering. Make sure your sewing machine is in optimal working order: feed, presser foot pressure, correct thread for the fabric, correct upper and lower thread tensions, correct (new, sharp) needle for the thread, etc. Control and guide the fabric properly during sewing.

If you want a seam like in picture 2 you'll need to use an overlocker (four-thread, or overlock + chainstitch). That is a different seam from the flat-felled one in picture 1. There are a few possibilities to produce a good, straight flat-felled seam in a shirt (auxilliary row of stitching, pressing into shape first, basting) if inexperienced. Proper handling and guiding of the fabric at the machine remains crucial.

On the armhole question I can't say anything helpful, as I don't understand the question. Something similar about the cuff question: Schneiderfrei already mentioned the important issues (in a normal sleeve the width is greater than the length of the cuff, the surplus is taken away in a couple of pleats), and I don't understand the picture, I'm afraid.
 


Edited by lepus, 06 April 2017 - 11:09 AM.

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#5 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 01:52 PM

I think that the type of seam you are referring to on the side seam is called a felled seam or run and fell.  They are the most popular kind for men's shirts.  

 

To do them with any kind of curve in the run of the seam requires great accuracy in the first stitching and a bit of massaging when you fold the excess over to make sure that it is evenly folded under.  

 

When you make the second stitching the alignment is very liable to slip. So, it is very advisable to baste this securely before making the second line of stitching, especially when you are learning.

 

Tailors never count their stitches.


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#6 peterle

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 05:38 PM

A puckering seam is also caused by too long stitches. I use 2mm stitches for shirts.

You must not push the fabric when sewing. let the machine move the fabric.

Another option for sewing neat seams is a french seam. Much easier to do on a home machine.(in industry there are special machines to do flat felled seams)

Usually the side seam and sleeve seam are sewn in one go. so yes, sew over the armpit.


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#7 Dunc

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 07:23 PM

That second photo (the wrangler shirt) is an overlocked seam, which is actually a cheap, quick and nasty way of closing a shirt seam (in my opinion, anyway). Flat felled seams are far nicer, if done properly. All quality shirts use flat felled seams. I'd highly recommend picking up a felling foot for your sewing machine, as these make flat felled seams much easier to produce for those of us who don't sit at a machine all day. There are plenty of tutorials out there (e.g. on YouTube) on how to use them.

 

The wrinkling at the seam in the third photo is probably caused by uneven tension in the fabric whilst sewing. You need to have both pieces of fabric correctly aligned, then grip them both behind and in front of the needle, and stretch them both slightly to ensure that the tension in both is the same as they go under the foot. Practice doing long straight runs like this on scrap.

 

Also, are you pinning the fabric together? Pins can introduce uneven tension, so I never use them for these sorts of seams. Just align the fabric carefully with your fingers, and sew in short bursts.

 

I never baste shirt seams myself, but I suppose it could be helpful at first.


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