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Learning to Tailor by Self Tuition- (Beginners Please Read)


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#163 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 12:03 AM

I still take the time to hand stitch entire garments.  Especially if I am learning a new kind of garment or if i can't be bothered turning on the machine.  Its quite absorbing and the construction is really burned into your mind by the time you finish a few trousers.  Then quickly enough you can pick up the machine when you get bored.


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#164 greger

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 05:12 AM

If you can sew dead straight and the length of the stitches fairly close the same as the others might as well start sewing clothes. Pressing open crooked stitched seams it will look really terrible, so straight stitches is very important. It is better to error with loose stitches than tight. Some tailors say the garment should be hung together with stitches, which is the opposite of tight. This allows flexibility of cloth and stitches. Stitch length can vary a little. Some tailors grab the needle close to the tip, that way their stitches cannot be longer. Eventually your eyes will measure the lengths very well. Some tailors were never allowed to use a line to help them sew straight. If you use them over time you won't need them. 


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#165 MontagueMerrill

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 06:33 AM

If you can sew dead straight and the length of the stitches fairly close the same as the others might as well start sewing clothes. Pressing open crooked stitched seams it will look really terrible, so straight stitches is very important. It is better to error with loose stitches than tight. Some tailors say the garment should be hung together with stitches, which is the opposite of tight. This allows flexibility of cloth and stitches. Stitch length can vary a little. Some tailors grab the needle close to the tip, that way their stitches cannot be longer. Eventually your eyes will measure the lengths very well. Some tailors were never allowed to use a line to help them sew straight. If you use them over time you won't need them. 

I like this idea.

 

I've already noticed that by the time you cut, press, pin, and baste a particular area, you might as well go ahead and hand stitch it. The sewing machine just doesn't seem to save a whole lot of time, except perhaps on really long seams.

 

With a hand-stitched garment, is the basting process the same? I baste with 1/4" stitches spaced 1/4" apart, directly on the seam.



#166 posaune

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 06:01 PM

you never baste direct on the seam. You baste besides because:
a) when fitting the baste seam give room
and
b)you avoid when sewing the seam catching the basting thread.
lg
posaune
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#167 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:11 PM

As any apprentice can tell you, trying to pick out seamed in bastings is pure hell. 😩
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#168 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:17 PM

Also the width, spacing or "thickness" of the bastings depends upon location, what you are doing and what one is trying to accomplish. This only comes with experience. Also one most take into account time as well. While it is good practice to do lovely and consistent bastings, reality in the work room may have to settle with "good enough" to get the job done. Personally, when it comes to pockets, I find if the machine is not set up its just as fast to put in by hand.
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#169 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 10:39 PM

I should really rewrite this and change the "tone" of the post and clarify and expand on some ideas. At the time of writing this we had people coming on wanting to make Elvis jumpsuits and Nazi uniforms. We also had a couple of learners out right demanding the senior member help them. I'm also considering some quick tutorials on pocket making and other odds and ends that might help the learner, however , time is limited for such endeavours.
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#170 MontagueMerrill

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 04:56 AM

you never baste direct on the seam. You baste besides because:
a) when fitting the baste seam give room
and
b)you avoid when sewing the seam catching the basting thread.
lg
posaune

I didn't know this!

 

This whole time, I've been basting directly on the seam, Yeah, it's a pain in the rear to pick out the seamed-in basting.

 

So it's better to baste right next to the seam? One millimeter away?



#171 posaune

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 06:19 AM

Do yourself a favor make it about 3 mm. :-))
lg
posaune
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