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How to sew a button in a professional way (highest grade) instruction needed.


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#19 dpcoffin

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 02:32 AM

Here's Claire's diagram:
Claire%27s%20button%20shank.jpg?dl=1


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#20 lepus

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 06:18 AM

Here's Claire's diagram:
 

 

That looks dangerously un-solid: only a single loop to hold the button, but embroidery on the stalk instead; I thought Claire Shaeffer meant the embroidery as an extra, instead of winding around a couple of times, but obviously not. Buttons regularly get loose at the top through wear, I find, not in the middle of the stalk.



#21 dpcoffin

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 06:34 AM

Didn't Claire say the point of this was to stiffen a long shank so the button stands more controllably proud of the garment, compared to just wrapping, not to increase the wear resistance?

Plus, she's showing a couture technique; adapting it to tailoring, I'd certainly use a 4-hole button with thread grooves and more thread… Like any interesting or new idea, it's ripe for improving to suit individual preferences:)


Edited by dpcoffin, 25 April 2017 - 06:34 AM.

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#22 Mammothy

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 07:02 AM

I think this is a very good and exact explanation.

 


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#23 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 08:35 AM

I have windows 7:

 

Sometimes, I have simply right clicked the icon in the dropbox folder and selected "Copy Dropbox link".

 

It doesn't allow editing, but that is not why I have put the file up anyway.

 

 

 

https://www.dropbox....erman).pdf?dl=0

 

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#24 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 12:19 PM

The button shank I posted was used in the couture jackets from YSL and Givenchy. In women's tailoring, wear and sturdiness are not a major consideration like in mens. Many couture workrooms use the wrapped method which David posted.

Another day I'll try the second Dropbox suggestion. This time--many thanks, David, for your help.

I watched the tailor and dressmaker video. There was good and bad. Inserting the eye of the needle into the button hole is an interesting concept to try. A waste knot would be better than a knot under the button.

Another issue to consider on button sewing and diff. on men's and women's jacket. Men's jackets are sewn with the threads to make an X; women's are sewn with the threads parallel. Will this affect the strength, wear, etc. C

Edited by Claire Shaeffer, 25 April 2017 - 12:33 PM.

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Claire Shaeffer

Author, Couture Sewing Techniques

claire.shaeffer@gmail.com

www.sewfari.org


#25 dpcoffin

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 12:22 PM

I always enjoy how well this works with no knot at all:) (Haven't lost a button yet!)


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#26 Mammothy

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 07:50 AM

Seems everyone is infatuated with buttons nowadays. Real Men Real Style on YouTube:

 


Edited by Mammothy, 26 April 2017 - 07:51 AM.

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#27 Mammothy

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 08:02 AM

I watched the tailor and dressmaker video. There was good and bad. Inserting the eye of the needle into the button hole is an interesting concept to try. A waste knot would be better than a knot under the button.

Another issue to consider on button sewing and diff. on men's and women's jacket. Men's jackets are sewn with the threads to make an X; women's are sewn with the threads parallel. Will this affect the strength, wear, etc. C

 

I'm sure they would appreciate if you left a comment.

I don't personally think that the parallel or crossed threads would make a difference. I used to wear men's shirts many years, because they were the only ones to fit my physique, and I didn't ever have a button fall off, now (after I gained a lot of weight), the shoulders and arms of the women's shirts suddenly fit, but I don't loose buttons here either.

 

I have lost (not really lost, but dropped) a few buttons from a coat (ladies) and my husband had to have most buttons of his nearly brand new gents Khujo jacket reattached.

 

As Mister Jim states: It's all in the thread....


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#28 Silentiumiva

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 10:12 PM

Thanks to everyone of the comments!



#29 greger

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 06:05 AM

Some religious people of a different faith than Christianity are opposed to the cross. Some people the cross stitch means nothing. Even some Christians don't connect it to the Cross. 



#30 Mammothy

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 10:49 PM

Some religious people of a different faith than Christianity are opposed to the cross. Some people the cross stitch means nothing. Even some Christians don't connect it to the Cross. 

 

Were those the ones who would refuse to add 1+1 because of the cross?

Tapestry work and cross stitch embroidery would be affected as well :)

 

I've seen an interesting variety of designs for button stitches on Pintrest, for all those who cater to vampires and such.


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#31 Jacob

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 10:53 PM

I think this is a very good and exact explanation.

 

 

 

Interesting that Gentleman Jim contradicts someone in a recent video I saw, who said that the needle should be pushed with the back of the thimbled finger, not the side of the thimbled finger. 

 

I haven't tried it yet, but it seems like trying to push the needle with the back of the middle right finger would be very awkward, and might cause as many problems as it supposedly prevents...I'm thinking I'd like Gentleman Jim's method more. 

 

Comments?



#32 tombennett

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 07:08 PM

IMHO: It maybe who taught him but in the UK tailors use the back of their finger, I was have in the past, and more recently with Rory, that the back is the best and safest.  If you try both you will probably realise that it is easier to push the needle straighter through the cloth using the back of your finger than the side.



#33 Dunc

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 09:36 PM

It's awkward at first, but it becomes quite natural with a bit of practice.



#34 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 01:03 AM

3 comments.

Generally, you push the needle with the back or top of the finger when taking any stitch so you would usually push the needle in the same way when sewing a button. That said--although most tailors push the needle with the back of the finger, you have to use what works best for you unless you work for someone else. Then you must use what your employer wants. If you are just learning, I recommend the back of the finger--just practice until you can do in your sleep.

 

In my diagram for sewing a button, it looks like the thread goes through the eyes only once or twice. It can go through more for a two-eyed button--usually 3 or 4 and a 4 eyed button 2 or 3 for each pair, depending on the garment and wear. A tuxedo button doesn't need the same durability for most men as a blazer. 

 

An observation When comparing dressmaking and tailoring techniques, the stitches are picked up differently. Tailors use a short between needle and pick up each and pull it through. Dressmakers sometimes use a long needle and pick up several stitches before pulling it through. 


Claire Shaeffer

Author, Couture Sewing Techniques

claire.shaeffer@gmail.com

www.sewfari.org


#35 posaune

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 02:05 AM

while we are at it: How do you place a shirt button in a buttonhole? Top or center?
lg
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#36 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 09:53 AM

I have tried to put the shirt buttons at the top, so it doesn't skew the hang of the shirt.


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