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Soft...But No Drape, Please!


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#19 jukes

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 05:48 AM

Taking off the collar and sleeves, undoing seams and repositioning it whilst still on the client is normal fitting procedure, to adjust fit and balance.

#20 greger

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 06:19 AM

If you didn't have two basted fittings with your other coats, then I would say they are not bespoke. The first fitting is mostly the body of the coat, or entirely, The next fitting is with a semi-finished coat, sleeves and collar fine tuning. Pins come in very handy as do the inlays to find where the seams should be. At first fitting the tailor fits the body and they you and the tailor fit (fine tune) the style.

#21 Sator

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 06:36 AM

I know one excellent tailor who may have either only one forward fitting or several basted fittings depending on whether the figure was proportionate or disproportionate. I don't think you can say that every tailor has to have two basted fitting.

#22 greger

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 12:37 PM

A rare few get by with out two or more on some people. Then there is the question, if he did more fittings, would they be better? The fitting skills vary among tailors and more fittings doesn't mean better. Some do a passing job, while others certainly expect better.

#23 occam's razor

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 05:14 AM

Thanks all for the comments.

Taking off the collar and sleeves, undoing seams and repositioning it whilst still on the client is normal fitting procedure, to adjust fit and balance.


What are the experiences of others who patronise Savile Row tailors? Perhaps my other SR tailors are comfortable with chalking up on the suit and relying on memory when the time came to altering it later on. I might have to ask them (apart from one) if they unstitch and reposition whilst the coat is on the client at the baste fitting stage.

Then there is the question, if he did more fittings, would they be better?


As a client, I would start to wonder if the tailor knew what he was doing if I repeatedly called in for fittings - I mean, I can only spare a certain amount of time and patience when it comes to getting garments made up. And besides, a large majority of my bespoke garments are for work so they do need to be completed punctually within the pre-agreed timeframe.

- OR

#24 Frog in Suit

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 08:00 PM

Thanks all for the comments.



What are the experiences of others who patronise Savile Row tailors? Perhaps my other SR tailors are comfortable with chalking up on the suit and relying on memory when the time came to altering it later on. I might have to ask them (apart from one) if they unstitch and reposition whilst the coat is on the client at the baste fitting stage.



As a client, I would start to wonder if the tailor knew what he was doing if I repeatedly called in for fittings - I mean, I can only spare a certain amount of time and patience when it comes to getting garments made up. And besides, a large majority of my bespoke garments are for work so they do need to be completed punctually within the pre-agreed timeframe.

- OR


RE: ripping apart: It varies. Sometimes yes (collar mostly, I seem to remember), but only at the baste, the rest of the time just chalking or pinning.

Multiple fittings: in my experience, I get at least three, but it has happened that as I was expecting to take delivery, the cutter unexpectedly finds something in the coat he does not like (I think it may be because of the maker not executing exactly what was required, but cannot be certain, as I am not a professional) and the suit goes back for another round. From the start I have made it clear that I prefer to wait, rather than walk out with something unsatisfactory. Bear in mind also that an extra ripping up and fitting constitutes an extra cost for the shop, but does not add to what you pay; I see it as evidence of conscientiousness on the part of the tailor, therefore a plus in my eyes. I think three fittings is the rule, with an occasional four and, perhaps, one instance of five over a period of three or so years (seven or eight garments).
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#25 jukes

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 01:49 AM

Thanks all for the comments.



What are the experiences of others who patronise Savile Row tailors? Perhaps my other SR tailors are comfortable with chalking up on the suit and relying on memory when the time came to altering it later on. I might have to ask them (apart from one) if they unstitch and reposition whilst the coat is on the client at the baste fitting stage.



As a client, I would start to wonder if the tailor knew what he was doing if I repeatedly called in for fittings - I mean, I can only spare a certain amount of time and patience when it comes to getting garments made up. And besides, a large majority of my bespoke garments are for work so they do need to be completed punctually within the pre-agreed timeframe.

- OR

Taking the seams apart and pinning to the new position (when Required) not only gives the fitter a look at fit and balance but also the customer, both can actually see the how the garment will look when complete and in most cases reduces the amount of fittings required. The travelling tailors will not want to fly around the world carrying out multiple fittings.
Oh and a cutter / fitter should never rely on memory, every alteraion and adjustment should also be written down.

Edited by jukes, 15 November 2010 - 01:52 AM.


#26 greger

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 02:08 PM

Pinning is a quick way to find out were the best place is for seams. Chalking may look sensiable, but you don't see the disruption of fit that may show up somewhere else. Some places chalking is fine, such as hems.




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