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How high can armholes go?


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#19 Sator

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 04:51 PM

We have time :Whistle:


It may have even been a figment of my imagination :pardon:

#20 Nishijin

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 05:10 PM

It may have even been a figment of my imagination :pardon:

Can you also imagine the whole paper this figment took place in ? :poke:
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#21 Martin Stall

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 06:03 PM

It may have even been a figment of my imagination :pardon:


You mean your scanner broke down?
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#22 Sator

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 06:21 PM

You mean your scanner broke down?



It's working perfectly - and my memory ain't so bad either :Big Grin:

From Z.W. Shaw principle author (and W.D.F. Vincent mentioned as secondary author only on inside cover), The Art of Trying-On or Fitting from The Tailor and Cutter circa 1890:

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In those days, neckpoints were much more crooked making coats prone to having tight scyes. At least, that's why I think this is partly why these sorts of stories seem to be fairly common. The reason alterations sometimes made it worse because the alterationist scooped out the front of scye, which then reduced the front shoulder measure.

#23 Sator

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 06:35 PM

Next comes the 1930s edition of the same book from The Tailor & Cutter. Shaw passed responsibility for updating the above book to W.D.F Vincent, who later became the principle author of the book with Percival Thickett as co-author. After Vincent retired, he passed the baton to Thickett who wrote the follow section on fixing discomfort in the scye:

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I like the phrase "with infinite zest I pointed out".

The Thickett era Tailor & Cutter draft has a neckpoint at 1/12 chest, and quite crooked by modern standards. I think that this makes it prone to producing a tight scye on a significant proportion of figures - enough that the tailor had to routinely check with their clients that the coat wasn't too tight in the scye.

#24 Nishijin

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 07:46 PM

The average customer pays his tailor the tribute of knowing his job and unless directly questionned on the point may be loath to express an opinion.


Mr. H.G.Wells ? When will you invent your time machine ? I want to go back to this time ! :Praying:
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Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
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#25 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 11:42 PM

I so want Shaws book.

A little history about the Art of trying on.

It was first released in the 1880's under Shaw's Nom de Plume "Untailleur" Later once Shaw started working for the tailor and cutter academy as the practical (sewing) tailor instructor
he started producing and rewriting his earlier works under his own name. His best book (or series) was a total re-edit of J.J. Byrnes work on making up.

Edited by J. Maclochlainn, 01 July 2010 - 11:47 PM.

Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#26 Martin Stall

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 11:56 PM

It's working perfectly - and my memory ain't so bad either :Big Grin:


Three cheers for Sator! AND his memory! AND ESPECIALLY his memory!

And, ehm, well, the, sort of, print function.... :frantics:
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#27 Sator

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 11:59 PM

And, ehm, well, the, sort of, print function.... :frantics:


It's a problem with the software maker. A request for support has been put in.

#28 Martin Stall

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 12:03 AM

Ah, you remembered :Big Grin:

My list of bookmarks is for articles to print is about to collapse and cave in on itself, and I'm not entirely sure the resulting black hole is going to be safe for the planet, so I hope them guys hurry up.

Thanks anyway Sator.
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#29 Svenn

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 03:55 AM

So please, let your tailor do as he knows. Tell him what you want to do in your coat, but not how he should do it. Either he knows, and all's OK, either he does not, and I doubt telling him his job will make a success.


Alright this is good to know, I'll just leave things be. I did explain to him my job requires lots of reaching and arm extension. IF by chance the armhole seems a little low in the basted fitting, will it be too late at that point to raise it (assuming he's capable)?

#30 mrmanners

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 04:12 AM

What is your job that it requires so much extending?

#31 Nishijin

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 05:49 AM

At basted fitting, unless there is a whole 4" to fill, it is still possible to correct things.
If you really need to keep your arms up, the sleeve must be cut accordingly too, so do not be surprised is the sleeve is a little strange.
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#32 Svenn

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 08:45 AM

At basted fitting, unless there is a whole 4" to fill, it is still possible to correct things.
If you really need to keep your arms up, the sleeve must be cut accordingly too, so do not be surprised is the sleeve is a little strange.


Oh good, I doubt the armhole would be 4'' too low, probably only an inch or two. Though don't different tailors do different kinds of basted makeups? i.e. perhaps he will have left only a half inch, or no fabric at all, extending beyond the proposed armhole seam?

Btw, I found this, which is amazing! :

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#33 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 05:54 AM

How high can the bottom of the armhole go? 2cm below the physical armpit? 1cm? flush?


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This photograph may answer your question! Fred Astire was a dancer, he would have had his coats cut with a very close, high armhole,
most of the time he would be dancing his arms would be near horizontal!

#34 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 06:01 AM

It's working perfectly - and my memory ain't so bad either :Big Grin:

From Z.W. Shaw principle author (and W.D.F. Vincent mentioned as secondary author only on inside cover), The Art of Trying-On or Fitting from The Tailor and Cutter circa 1890:

Posted Image

Posted Image

In those days, neckpoints were much more crooked making coats prone to having tight scyes. At least, that's why I think this is partly why these sorts of stories seem to be fairly common. The reason alterations sometimes made it worse because the alterationist scooped out the front of scye, which then reduced the front shoulder measure.




Did the customers' abcess get better???

#35 Sator

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 10:08 AM

Did the customers' abcess get better???


Alas, no! It's funny how irrelevantly chatty these old writers can be. Shaw is pretty to the point compared to others.

#36 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 08:36 AM

1/8 chest girth + 1/16 body hight - 1.0cm
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