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Just starting out and I'm a bit confused by this.


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#1 FeelingMXBlue

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Posted 15 January 2018 - 04:05 PM

I've been reading the Self Tuition post and truly desire to do well and progress. I know that the hand stitching is fundamental so I want to make sure I'm doing it right. I am having trouble loading the images linked in the thread describing the different types of stitches which may be the source of the confusion. Anyway, here's my question:

 

Which of these stitches (circled or squared) that I'm sewing are correct fore stitches referenced in the beginner post? I know this seems trivial, sorry.

 

https://imgur.com/XDDMISR


Edited by FeelingMXBlue, 15 January 2018 - 04:08 PM.


#2 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 15 January 2018 - 07:48 PM

Please say which kind of stitches you are trying to show. 

 

They look like running stitch vs pick stitches, circle vs square.

 

Back stitches are very useful.


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#3 tombennett

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Posted 15 January 2018 - 11:21 PM

The first thing before making stitches is to learn the correct way to use the needle and open top thimble.

 

This is an excellent video on using a thimble:

https://www.youtube....XurOuNciXpktm8w

 

Rory's videos on hand sewing are very clear and instructive:

https://www.youtube....yjT-ZSNbkCvQCoA

 

And, here is a chart of hand stitches:

https://i.pinimg.com...b6f21d0cdbe.jpg

 

Follow these and you can't go far wrong.


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#4 FeelingMXBlue

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 01:55 AM

Please say which kind of stitches you are trying to show.

 

As far as I could tell, the post says to practice "fore-stitches" until you can essentially do it without thinking about it, then "back-stitches", and so on with different types. When I google fore-stitch to get a better understanding however, all I could find was running stitch and back-and-fore stitch. Thus, my confusion. I assumed it was running stitch, but I wanted to be certain. Thank you for your time.

 

 

The first thing before making stitches is to learn the correct way to use the needle and open top thimble.

 

This is an excellent video on using a thimble:

https://www.youtube....XurOuNciXpktm8w

 

Rory's videos on hand sewing are very clear and instructive:

https://www.youtube....yjT-ZSNbkCvQCoA

 

And, here is a chart of hand stitches:

https://i.pinimg.com...b6f21d0cdbe.jpg

 

Follow these and you can't go far wrong.

 

I appreciate your resources, thank you. I'm currently stuck using a closed top thimble that doesn't quite fit properly from Wal-Mart until I can find time to make a trip to the nearest fabric store (47 min. drive one way) but I'm still trying my best to use it in the proper manner. The videos and the chart will no doubt be beneficial so thanks again.



#5 tombennett

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 02:35 AM

Yes, it's a running stitch never heard of fore stitch, then a back stitch as per the chart.


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#6 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 08:17 AM

Fore stitch is same as running stitch
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#7 Henry Hall

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 09:11 AM

I wonder how many people here actually use a running/fore stitch apart from basting?


Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

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#8 lngn2

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 07:52 PM

Ref thimbles my experience of them was revolutionised after making one out of some scrap leather. Plenty of tutorials online and it could save you a big drive!

#9 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 10:54 PM

I have tried to make yubinuki as peterle has displayed on this site.  Mine are functional but not anything to boast about, not the indescribably beautiful examples one can find on pinterest.


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#10 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 07 February 2018 - 01:50 AM

I wonder how many people here actually use a running/fore stitch apart from basting?


The fore-stitch is the foundational mechanic which all other stitches are formed. While a fore stitch is primarily used as a basting stitch (if looking at it as mearly a running stitch) you use the same principles in its formation as you would a felling stitch which is a fore stitch thats formed off axis or even a padding stitch which is a fore stitch thats taken on a different plain. So to this, is why I feel the fore-stitch is the most important to master. It also has the benefit of training muscle memory, stitch spacing and can be easily removed for more practice. Im really just going to make a YouTube video on the principles of needle work.
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#11 Henry Hall

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Posted 08 February 2018 - 12:28 PM

The fore-stitch is the foundational mechanic which all other stitches are formed. While a fore stitch is primarily used as a basting stitch (if looking at it as mearly a running stitch) you use the same principles in its formation as you would a felling stitch which is a fore stitch thats formed off axis or even a padding stitch which is a fore stitch thats taken on a different plain. So to this, is why I feel the fore-stitch is the most important to master. It also has the benefit of training muscle memory, stitch spacing and can be easily removed for more practice. Im really just going to make a YouTube video on the principles of needle work.

 

I suppose it's the most basic forward stitch, yes. A fell stitch is more like a padding stitch in the way it is formed (I see you alluded to this). There are other similar stitches, but they depart from being running stitches in the way they anchor themselves and behave under tension. If we were going to be doing the business of identifying the 'foundational mechanic' it would probably be the act of how one pierces the cloth with the needle. I'm not too worried about all that.

 

What I was asking was if, beyond basting, anyone uses a running stitch for anything else. Since it's extremely weak as a permanent stitch and gathers too easily, I assume not. It's useful for gathering as another sort temporary stitch. It plays it's part.


Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).





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