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Inlays


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#1 Kenn

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 10:15 AM

This is my understanding of inlays after some research.
Example is a waistcoat:
After drafting the pattern the specified inlay dimensions are added to the fabric.
The wigan/fusable for the forepart in this instance is cut to the patterns size minus the inlays so the inlays can fold over the wigan/fusable.
Then the lining is placed over all this.
Is this correct?
Thanks

#2 Steelmillal

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 11:08 AM

https://www.google.c...n&client=safari

The search function of the forum works great and the forum is extensive. Since you know how to extract archived pages for photos, you've much to digest. Enjoy for learn-burn. Good stuff!

#3 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 04:33 PM

Wigan is not an interlining for a waistcoat, rather linen canvas/Holland. 

 

In a general way, an inlay is any amount of extra cloth that is added in excess of the seam allowance.  I guess you are referring in part to the front and bottom inlays that are folded over.  These can also be added as extra pieces. 

 

The more common purpose of inlays is to provide an extra amount of cloth for any changes in size after the time the clothes are made.

 

The inlay forms a rather larger seam allowance.


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 17 April 2018 - 07:24 PM.

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#4 Kenn

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 12:01 AM

Thanks.
Yes I understand wigan isn't a lining. It's what gives the forepart body.
The lining covers the wigan.
So if I understand correctly inlays are for the purpose of letting out later on to get longevity out of a garment.
So if an inlay is actually sewn on as a separate piece as it can be, it would have to be within the seam allowance as not to show it was stitched in, so if it is let out you have room until you hit the inlays seam.
Thus you would have two seams, one for the regular seam allowance and the one for the inlays, if the inlay were stitched in.
Danka

#5 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 10:06 AM

What I wrote is interlining not lining. Another word is interfacing.

 

I heard of wigan being used to reinforce cuffs and pockets, maybe hems.

 

If Poulin is using it for waistcoats, that's not that common. Again, holland/linen canvas is more traditional.

 

The "inlays" for the front and hem of the waistcoat are not always "Grown on" i.e. cut out with the front fabric, but are sometimes "Sewn on". These parts are not used to increase the size of the garment.

 

The Inlay at the side seam which is used to make alterations in size, should certainly not be sewn on unless to correct a regrettable error.


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 18 April 2018 - 10:14 AM.

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#6 Kenn

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 02:03 AM

I looked up holland linen and it seems to not be here in the US, what would be a similar fabric that I can substitute.

#7 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 10:57 AM

Any medium/heavy weight neutral coloured linen would be a good cloth, As suggested elsewhere light/very light weight hair or hymo.

 

That's the kind of thing.  I have used both.

 

G


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#8 tombennett

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 08:37 PM

The idea of the canvas/interlining is really there to add a little stiffness to the face cloth so it shapes and drapes about the torso. Try ringing these people in New York (http://www.oshmanbrothers.com), they will help you out, it'll be easier and quicker than setting a quiz on the forum.


Edited by tombennett, 20 April 2018 - 08:38 PM.

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