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Richard Anderson Talks to Drapers


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#1 Sator

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 11:08 AM

http://www.draperson...5006170.article

Hunstman trained Savile Row tailor Richard Anderson has recently released a new book entitled Bespoke: Savile Row Ripped and Smoothed.

http://www.amazon.co...w...2662&sr=8-1

His book is non-technical in nature and reminisces on his experiences working on Savile Row. He currently has his own tailoring firm on Savile Row after leaving Hunstman.

#2 hymo

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 10:51 PM

Am halfway through this book right now.

"The ability to visualise a body even when its owner is no longet standing in front of you --- to convert his two-dimensional pattern into a three-dimensional image in one's mind --- is called Rock of Eye."

Elsewhere:
"They (Hammick & Hall) both used the antiquated Thornton System, passed down in turn from their masters Borland and Pressland and immortalised in a book published in 1893..."

Googled this system and turns out it's still very relevant on SR
http://news.bbc.co.u...ics/8118143.stm

#3 NJS

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 12:36 AM

Maybe, instead of 'antiquated' he really meant 'old and established'.
<b></b>NJS<b></b>

#4 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 01:05 AM

perhaps I'll scan in the Thornton system I have that is "modernized (1949)". It has a lot of the features such as front dart the thornton systems I've seen don't have
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Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#5 hymo

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 02:22 AM

I think by antiquated he means he no longer uses it himself. After all, he cuts under his own label now.

#6 tombennett

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 04:15 AM

perhaps I'll scan in the Thornton system I have that is "modernized (1949)". It has a lot of the features such as front dart the thornton systems I've seen don't have

 

 

Hi Jason, sorry to be a pain as I know you are very busy but, if you have time I would love to see the "modernised" Thornton.  I have the International System hardback, be interesting to see how it changed.

 

I'm sure it would be interesting to others here.

 

Many thanks,

Tom



#7 greger

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 05:48 AM

Here is something about "modern" darts and pleats.

It is on Satorial Notes.

T'was told that all the seams should be out of sight from the front. Asked about the breast dart. It was added because it holds its shape. Whereas, shrinking and stretching are not so reliable. Think the story at Satorial Notes is correct. Tailoring guilds decided to agree with whoever started it. The breast darts were added with reason on lounge and reefers. Body coats are a different "animal".

 

Some tailors don't care if seams show from the front, such as the shoulder seams. Others think seams mar the appearance, therefore, not pristine. 



#8 tombennett

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 06:44 AM

Thanks Greger.  an excellent article, I have seen it before but thanks for reminding me about it.  I am particularly interested in the Thornton modification as my cousin used a modified Thornton system but can't find it amongst his books and stuff which I have now inherited as I have found my passion for tailoring again, must have been left at the shop when he sold out to the Rowlands'.  I use a different system, Rory's but would love to see the modification to the original sectional system.  I agree that ironwork on its own ins't sufficient for the front, IMHO I think the use of a front dart is fine in conjunction with Mr Donlon's fine wedge alteration, on larger waists, to control the front edge.  I am currently working on a Thornton frock coat to see how it comes out so am aware that these two methods are redundant in body coats.  I think that today's client isn't going to bother with Shrinking as they don't really have valets anymore so the front dart is essential, also people these days want more waist. Even A&S are cutting more waist into their coats.



#9 posaune

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 08:06 AM

Well, I think that all this shrinking will not work with modern fabric.

What do you think?

So use modern drafts.

lg posaune


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#10 greger

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 05:53 PM

Crooken patterns make beautiful coats. Stay tape and other methods help hold the shape where possible. Some methods that were used for making patterns in the old days still work fine. They need to be adjusted for whatever cloth that will be used. This is true even in the old days. Silk and wool are a bit different, as is thick and thin wool, or tightly woven worsted and loosely woven woolens. There are advantages to both the new and old. One way to think of a pattern is that it has several dots that you can move. When looking at the customer you can move those dots to specific places according to how much you think you can get out of the cloth for manipulation. Paper patterns that have unnecessary details interfere with adjusting for different types of cloth and styles and fads. Some old patterns were yuk! Some methods of construction were just as terrible. But some tailors seemed to live in a different world, because they always made magnificent garments (the truly gifted). Patterns only take us so far. The rest is in the artist eye. 



#11 hansolo325

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Posted 30 May 2018 - 11:56 PM

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