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"Fused-Full" Canvas Construction?


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#1 waterampage

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Posted 31 October 2015 - 02:59 PM

Hi,

 

I was recently told that, if one wishes to achieved a more structured coat, there is a method of construction known as "fused-full canvassing". Apparently this involves a full-length canvas down the front of the coat, but with bottom half reinforced by fusing the bottom half of the canvas to the front of the coat. 

 

This sounds like a cross between a half- and full-canvassed garment and am wondering what the value of such a method of construction is. Does it truly result in a more structured look? Or is this a cop-out in the sense of providing a full canvas front but eliminating the need for handwork?

 

Thanks.

 

 



#2 Terri

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Posted 31 October 2015 - 10:45 PM

Not something I have heard of, but mtm and rtw is not my main experience.

To fuse the only lower part of the canvas to the wool just sounds odd.
Fusible canvas exists but it gives a very very firm result.
I have seen suit fronts in very light weight fabrics skin fused with a very light weight fusible then a full canvas put in.
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#3 jeffrey2117

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Posted 31 October 2015 - 11:39 PM

Hi,

 

I was recently told that, if one wishes to achieved a more structured coat, there is a method of construction known as "fused-full canvassing". Apparently this involves a full-length canvas down the front of the coat, but with bottom half reinforced by fusing the bottom half of the canvas to the front of the coat. 

 

This sounds like a cross between a half- and full-canvassed garment and am wondering what the value of such a method of construction is. Does it truly result in a more structured look? Or is this a cop-out in the sense of providing a full canvas front but eliminating the need for handwork?

 

Thanks.

 

 

Hello,

 

    I have two men's jackets in my shop with this construction, the jackets are fully canvased the same as I would normally do, except the canvas is fusible.  It provided a good look and nice structure to the fronts of these jackets. 

 

The lapels seem a bit flat with not much roll to them is the only thing I notice. 

 

Kind regards

 

Jeffrey2117


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#4 waterampage

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Posted 02 November 2015 - 03:53 PM

 

 

Fusible canvas exists but it gives a very very firm result. 

 

 

the jackets are fully canvased the same as I would normally do, except the canvas is fusible.

 

Thanks guys. I clarified this with the tailor I spoke with the first time around and he mentioned that he is not using fusible canvas. Rather, there is a fusible interlining between the coat fabric and the wool canvas; the three layers are then fused together.

 

Again, this sounds strange to me but would appreciate it if anyone can shed light on whether this is a viable method of coatmaking. Thanks.



#5 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 12:11 AM

I think the material he is calling a fusible interlining is a fusible web. This is readily available in over the counter fabric stores. 

 

It is a lightweight web material which can be placed between two fabric layers. When pressed with heat and moisture it melts and fuses them together.

 

I think this would be horrible on a jacket front. If you must have a fused front as in RTW, there are some good quality fusible interfacings. They provide a nice firm front, but they don't have the wonderful tactile quality of a sew-in interfacing. 

 

For women's jackets, I like the couture YSL front. They used a bias-cut hair canvas (hymo) for the entire front with a second chest piece layer. The interfacing was sewn into the seams; this requires vigorous pressing to flatten the seams. 


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#6 Terri

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 11:14 PM

I think this would be horrible on a jacket front.


I agree!!
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#7 greger

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Posted 04 November 2015 - 05:43 PM

It is not hard to make up a simple canvas and put it in. It seems to me fuse is more trouble than it's worth and room for more errors.
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#8 tarcisio

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Posted 04 November 2015 - 07:21 PM

I’m afraid I didn’t get that. This is a real question:

How do you guys make jackets with thin fabrics like tropical? i've seen jackets with a lightweight fused interface. Do you follow the usual construction?



#9 suitcust

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 07:31 PM

The fusible makes the coat drape better. You can achieve the same effect by pad stitching a piece of pocketing fabric at the bottom. It is common among Japanese Tailors (esp the older generation). 


Edited by suitcust, 22 January 2016 - 07:31 PM.


#10 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 09:57 AM

Light fabric can be semi fused and then build up with regular canvas construction.


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