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Trench Coats


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#1 CoronarJunkee

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 04:07 AM

Hey everyone,

The other day, I saw a woman in the Paris métro who was wearing a very nice trenchcoat made of linen with a chiné effect to it. It seemed to be an elegant couture interpretation of the garment with very nice details.
So I started to wonder about the men's trenchcoat. I think I've never seen a draft for one in the classical cutting systems (not even in the military sections). Is it considered a tailored garment? Would a trenchcoat lapel and collar be padstitched (I wonder because of the fabric where every stitch would necessarily be seen and you'd have the tendency to wear the collar and lapel both ways visible)?
The only trenchcoat I encountered yet in a cutting system is in the Müller Systemschnitt which is an advanced homesewers cutting system. The trenchcoat inthere is very 80s and has therefore not the classical elegance to it.
But since it's a military garment, I suppose they have been made to certain rules and proportions. So if I can't find them in tailoring books, who made them? And whom would you go to today if you wanted a custom trenchcoat made. All trenchcoats can't be bought from Burberrys, can they?

And that's already it.
Just wondering.

Maybe someone knows.

Cheers

David

PS : maybe it's the wrong forum, but I thought maybe someone would come up with a pattern (which I'd be delighted of) and that's why I didn't put it in the bespeaker's forum.
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#2 Sator

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 08:11 AM

All military officer's uniforms were at once stage a bespoke tailored garment. This comes from J.P. Thornton, from 1915:

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#3 CoronarJunkee

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 08:44 AM

Oh thanks! That was quick.

This is the first draft of a trench coat I see which has utility looks rather than a fashion styling. altough it doesn't have that shoulder panel a burberry for example has (i thought it was supposed to prevent the coat from wear when shouldering a gun).
Is it just me or does one not cross trench coat patterns even in military cutting systems a lot?

It is written :
"This coat in various forms is now being extensively advertised and freely sold by most of our leading military outfitters, and as it is one that any tailor can successfully produce it is essential that all particulars relating to it should be placed at the disposal of the trade. It is not an officially recognized garment, so that no instructions as to its details are found in War Office regulations, nor are any "Sealed Patterns" available."
Maybe that's the explanation. Every tailor could have produced his own pattern starting from a db-overcoat or a military greatcoat, tuning the outfitting details to his own taste...

This coat is made of drill. Woolen drill I suppose. Then padstitching is possible. But on which side of the lapel would one do this here? or would one do it at all since there are buttons and buttonholes everywhere to likely hold the canvas in place? Also : where would be a roll line if padstitching...

And : they mention "oiled silk". Has anyone ever come across something like this? I have difficulties imagining what that could look like. The main problem probably lies in the fact that I imagine oiling pongé silk since I use that quality sometimes to line a garment...
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#4 Digby Snaffles

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Posted 02 June 2010 - 08:59 PM

All military officer's uniforms were at once stage a bespoke tailored garment.


Having chosen and been accepted into their regiment of choice, in a process rather similar to applying to University, Officer Cadets at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst are given a grant, with which they are to seek out an accredited tailor from whom they are to commission a uniform. Tailors will also visit RMAS on scheduled days to ply their services. Considering Officer Cadets are drawn from a much more diverse pool than they have been traditionally I think it fair to suggest that many will have little knowledge of the more prestigious houses, their experience of sartorialism not extending far beyond purchasing an off-the-peg suit from M&S. Saying that Guards and dashing Cavalry regiments still have very strong public schoolboy contingents and may well take advantage of the concessions offered to bespeak some private purchases (a private trench coat perhaps - I just realised that this longer than expected post is digressing from the topic at hand!)

The application process takes a ridiculously long time but assuming that I do get in (and despite uniforms being on the borders of costume perhaps?) I'd be more than happy to post the assortment of uniforms I will hopefully have made.
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#5 Sator

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Posted 02 June 2010 - 11:24 PM

despite uniforms being on the borders of costume perhaps?


Modern uniforms of all kinds both for military and civilian use are still very much the traditional realm of bespoke tailoring. So please feel free to post away! I'd love to see more discussion of military bespoke tailoring.

#6 bone19

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 08:21 PM

I've decided to resurrect this old thread as I've been thinking of trying my own cotton gabardine trench coat. But I do have a question, would you use any interlining or pad stitching to provide minimal structure or should it be totally in structured?
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#7 greger

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 10:27 AM

the one in the picture looks unlined. Vest (canvas) lining might be fine.


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#8 Lewis Davies

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 05:37 AM

it depends on the effect 

i make them al lthe time so you can fuse it 

if you check my blog you can see i canvassed one its up to you and how long you want to take to make it 


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#9 bone19

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 09:52 AM

Thanks Lewis. I went and tried a Burberry coat on and it felt as if they have used a very light fusing in the chest and lapels

#10 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 07:26 AM

Oh thanks! That was quick.

This is the first draft of a trench coat I see which has utility looks rather than a fashion styling. altough it doesn't have that shoulder panel a burberry for example has (i thought it was supposed to prevent the coat from wear when shouldering a gun).
Is it just me or does one not cross trench coat patterns even in military cutting systems a lot?

It is written :
"This coat in various forms is now being extensively advertised and freely sold by most of our leading military outfitters, and as it is one that any tailor can successfully produce it is essential that all particulars relating to it should be placed at the disposal of the trade. It is not an officially recognized garment, so that no instructions as to its details are found in War Office regulations, nor are any "Sealed Patterns" available."
Maybe that's the explanation. Every tailor could have produced his own pattern starting from a db-overcoat or a military greatcoat, tuning the outfitting details to his own taste...

This coat is made of drill. Woolen drill I suppose. Then padstitching is possible. But on which side of the lapel would one do this here? or would one do it at all since there are buttons and buttonholes everywhere to likely hold the canvas in place? Also : where would be a roll line if padstitching...

And : they mention "oiled silk". Has anyone ever come across something like this? I have difficulties imagining what that could look like. The main problem probably lies in the fact that I imagine oiling pongé silk since I use that quality sometimes to line a garment...



I think the garment you have in mind is the officers trench coat, which was a rubberised fabric
("oiled silk", which may have been used in the first instance.) The shoulder section you mention, was left loose across the chest and across the back (it was not seamed down) this allowed for free passage of air to the inside of the coat due to the garment being none permeable.
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#11 Lewis Davies

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 05:08 AM

I have got a few burberry ones including a porsum one they are all fused 

event the army officers greatcoats of today are fused, i made mine especially from canvas it took a while and looks nice but the only real benefit is to my own taste. 

ill post a picture how it should be fused up later on 

remember you are talking about a garment that was made to wear over uniforms and have heavy use its a free and easy garment 

the greatcoats today that are fitted have a totally different construction 

what style were you looking for? 



#12 posaune

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 07:07 PM

"including a porsum one"

Lewis, please, what is a porsum??

"I'll post a picture how it should be fused up later on"

That would be very nice! (I am a practicing fuser)
lg
posaune

#13 bone19

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 05:13 AM

I have got a few burberry ones including a porsum one they are all fused 
event the army officers greatcoats of today are fused, i made mine especially from canvas it took a while and looks nice but the only real benefit is to my own taste. 
ill post a picture how it should be fused up later on 
remember you are talking about a garment that was made to wear over uniforms and have heavy use its a free and easy garment 
the greatcoats today that are fitted have a totally different construction 
what style were you looking for? 


Lewis,

Just bumping this thread from last year. The coat I had in mind was similar to those offered by Burberry today. Slim but room enough to wear over a suit




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