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close fitting jacket


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#37 zokiTzar

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 07:16 PM

thanks posaune i did it already
also the two back ones i transfered
i want to have close fit but not much disturbance to the pattern

#38 Todd Hudson

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 07:03 AM

Hello Zokitzar,
Thank you for sharing this project with us. A woman with such girth in the front bust must have some fleshy weight and spinal curve in the back in order that she can stand up balanced on her feet. If her back was as flat as your pattern assumes, she would fall on her face. Looking at the garment on the woman's back, it appears that there is not enough room over her blades and center back. Once you put in the sleeves, we see the defects are more obvious (or is this her low shoulder so it looks worse?). Looking at the paper pattern, it appears you need to add more curve to the CB seam where she needs it and bigger shoulder darts will help too.

Before next fitting, remeasure back neck of garment compared to pattern and reinforce well with stay tape so it does not stretch out on client. You want it to match pattern exactly and stay there. Tell the client to wear a collared shirt to next fitting. Your pattern has very narrow back neck of the type that should be hanging way up there off C7.

At next fitting, without sleeves basted in, pull up the entire coat so the CB hangs off of C7 on the spine. This is the seventh vertebrae and the first one to stick out when she bends her neck forward. Pin the CB top to her shirt collar but try not to ruin her shirt with your pin mind you. If you are worried about ruining her collar, then tie some folded muslin around her neck like necktie. Now with the coat hanging higher off C7, you may notice diagonal drag lines from under blades are even worse. Next release CB seam starting at 1/2 below top of CB and down to above waist fitting. See where the CB seam wants to spread out for her spinal curve and across the blades. This is a lateral adjustment so ignore the vertical problems that arise for few minutes (such as suddenly too much length in CB above hips). Next pin in new back seam with added curve. Then, look for remaining DIAGONAL drag lines coming from bottom of back armhole pointing up toward shoulder blades (different from diagonal tension from front hip up towards back). Now with your hands, smooth up those diagonal drag lines up and into the shoulder dart area too see how much bigger the darts need to be. Take note of the increase needed. Low shoulder may need bigger dart than high shoulder. Take coat off of client and rebaste shoulder seams with bigger darts and CB seam with more curve. Put coat back on client.

Now that you have provided both lateral shape at CB and thus more CB length, as well as more lateral room for the blades across the back, you might find the entire back of coat collapsing into her waist above her hips. This means the entire back balance is now too long. Look at the profile to see if there are diagonal drags from front of coat bust down toward back hips. This also indicates a too long back. If the entire back seems too long, fold and pin an even horizontal fold across the blade peaks until the coat simply rests on the hips without collapsing. The entire length of this pinned fold is equal to how much shorter the entire back must be at both side seams. Next look for looseness near the top-ends of shoulders. This looseness indicates some sloping is necessary in the shoulders. Start the slope from the dart area. Be careful not to slope to the point of tightness which will make the back neck rise up off the body.

If you don't notice the long-back symptoms, then look for short-back symptoms which at profile would demonstrate as diagonal tension from front hip up toward upper back. In this case, you need to find out how much longer to make the back. First mark with pin CB neck seam position on her shirt collar or necktie. Now pull down entire back until it gently rests on hips and the tension at profile changes from diagonal to nil (or horizontal). Now pin second mark at collar at CB seam position. Now measure difference between first and second pin. The measurement tells you how much to lengthen entire back.

You may find the low shoulder side needs a perhaps more crooked back neck point, a bigger shoulder dart and more slope in the shoulder than the high side.

Now that you have radically changed the back, show it to us, then baste in BOTH sleeves and show us the front to see what more work is needed there. If you conduct a fitting with merely one sleeve basted in, misleading asymmetries may arise especially if the coat body does not fit to begin with. Remember that the misfit garment is working very hard to correct itself to fit the body by pulling this way and that. If you put one sleeve on a misfit coat, the coat will take advantage of the new appendage and further try to correct itself to make room for the body in an unattractive fashion. It can be quite difficult to evaluate fit if you give the coat this advantage of confusing you. A coat works best at rest.

Edited by Todd Hudson, 15 July 2011 - 06:13 PM.


#39 zokiTzar

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 04:00 PM

thanks todd
very detailed instructions
i will recut, baste and then get back

#40 zokiTzar

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 12:55 AM

hi
for this close fitting draft from the post above
how would the canvas look
as i have heavy tweed for it i would like to do it unlined
i cut facings wide to extend into armhole at the side seam
and would like to hide canvas under it
but since front is heavily darted and i have curved breast seam how do i cut canvas
or should this type have full canvas like peplum jacket in womens cabrerra?
thanks
z

#41 Sator

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 10:22 AM

I would be inclined to follow the pattern of the coat for the canvas. Have you seen this thread?

http://www.cutterand...?showtopic=1451

I wouldn't canvas anything other than the fronts unless the cloth chosen was more like a dressmaking weight cloth. Cabrera's peplum coat is meant to be unusually skirty and the canvas is to keep this part clean. Be careful though with panelled canvasses on modern cloth. Take care to avoid having the cuts show through from the right side. Suggestions include having the panel seams on the coat and canvas almost overlap, so that one is covered by the seam allowance of the other. I would also cover the canvas cuts with a strip of fusible.

For ladies' tailoring keep the canvas light and pliable to aim for an especially soft and feminine feel. Avoid heaviness that comes with multiple layers. You may even want to omit the domette, but then cover the cut edges of the haircloth carefully with a strip of Silesia on the bias.

#42 zokiTzar

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 03:13 PM

great thanks sator
i get the idea now
btw my cloth is what zs would call carpet like its heavy 50s tweed




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