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Shirt drafting: at a loss


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#1 mhoyle

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 06:19 AM

 
I have sewn quite some shirts from Shimazaki's pattern for myself which fit quite nicely (though not perfect of course). It has taught me the basics of shirtmaking, and I feel confident in my sewing skills to start sewing for other people now. One thing I want to start learning, especially for some of my friends who don't really fit standard sizes (tall and thin, very broad shouldered, etc), is how to draft shirts.
 
I have tried the Aldrich method once before, but read on the forums that some people don't like it very much. I've also seen a Rundschau draft from the 50's that looks a bit like a sack, and one more recent one that looks more fitted. I have read up on the previous topics on shirt drafting, but it seems I can't see the forest through the trees anymore.
 
Some of the methods I have come across on the forums are:
Aldrich
Kershaw
Rundshau (50's)
Rundschau more modern (apparently provided to benjaminh by Schneiderfrei)
Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers: Menswear by Lori Knowles
 
 
I understand that drafting and cutting is something you learn over time and is not done in a day and am also looking into taking classes (if anyone knows of a good course in The Netherlands, let me know). Yet I would like to start out on the right track. Any thoughts and opinions on these methods, or other preferred methods?
 
Kind regards,
 
Mickey

Edited by mhoyle, 26 June 2018 - 07:00 AM.

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#2 pfaff260

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 02:16 PM

Depends on where you live. A few suggestions:

http://www.ensaid.nl/

https://danckaerts.nl/

http://www.snijschool.nl/


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#3 pfaff260

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 02:21 PM

There's also this one: http://www.meesterop...ding/inleiding/

 

I went to the Rotterdamse Snijschool who have just one location and that's in Rotterdam.

They teach men as well as women. Most do only women. Except the above, they have a

tailoringcourse aswell.


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#4 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 09:33 PM

If you can read German I would recommend the Rundschau book on Shirts - Hemnden. 

 

The modern Rundschau approach is very efficient.


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#5 mhoyle

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Posted 26 June 2018 - 10:25 PM

There's also this one: http://www.meesterop...ding/inleiding/

 

I went to the Rotterdamse Snijschool who have just one location and that's in Rotterdam.

They teach men as well as women. Most do only women. Except the above, they have a

tailoringcourse aswell.

I actually live almost next to this school in Amsterdam. I had already heard of them and looked up their programma, but could not find a course that was focussed on shirt making per se. I'll give them a ring, you never know what's possible. 

 

 

If you can read German I would recommend the Rundschau book on Shirts - Hemnden. 

 

The modern Rundschau approach is very efficient.

 

Yes! I do read German fluently (so if anyone needs a translation...) and already have a Rundschau book for trousers (a jeansmaker recommended it to me for making a basic jeans pattern). It's a shame the books are so expensive since I'll probably only want to use one or two patterns.



#6 greger

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 02:47 AM

Maybe you can find the book at a library and copy the pages you like.

If your interest expands then most of book would be very handy.

Some tailors invent their own methods of patterns. Some tailors demand that. To do this you would first learn a number of methods.

Thought someone posted some online lessons. 



#7 mhoyle

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 05:15 PM

I looked around and found the book in the catalog of our university's fashion department. I'll go and have a look at it on friday!



#8 mhoyle

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 05:16 PM

 

Thought someone posted some online lessons. 

Which lessons would that be?



#9 Dunc

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 07:11 PM

That would be Mike Maldonado. His course is apparently pretty good, despite the look of the website... I've been meaning to buy it (or at least parts of it) for ages, but between my personal dislike of video as an instructional medium, various issues with my home computer, and just being a bit too busy, I haven't got around to it, so I can't offer a personal opinion.



#10 mhoyle

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 07:23 PM

Ah yes, I stumbled upon his site last year. It does look a little janky, and the qualitiy of the videos looks poor. Also, $400,- is not money easily coughed up... But I would be open to some reviews if people have bought his course.



#11 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 28 June 2018 - 05:19 PM

the rundschau books are expensive, but they are trade technical quality.  I haven't begrudged them.

 

My medical ones were much more.

 

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#12 mhoyle

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Posted 30 June 2018 - 12:57 AM

So I went to the library, got myself a copy of the Rundschau Hemden book and drew a pattern. 

 

I just don't understand whether or not there are any seam allowances built in.

In the drafting things are calculated with what looks like a seam allowance

 

 

image: https://www.dropbox.....53.08.jpg?dl=0

 

 

but if I compare my yoke to all the other yokes I have from readymade patterns it clearly looks like I'm missing a 1cm seam allowance on every side.

 

 

image: https://www.dropbox....G_5445.JPG?dl=0

 

 

Any suggestions?


Edited by mhoyle, 30 June 2018 - 12:57 AM.

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#13 pfaff260

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Posted 30 June 2018 - 01:45 AM

As far as i know the draft is without seams.


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#14 posaune

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Posted 30 June 2018 - 05:26 PM

Right Pfaff230., shirt has no s.a. The table he showed is the ease tabelle (Z = Zugabe), which is used to get different fitting classes slim, normal and wide.

lg

posaune


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#15 mhoyle

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Posted 30 June 2018 - 11:35 PM

I'll soon be posting my muslin photo's!


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#16 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 01:35 PM

That is the same draft that I showed to benjaminh. The book is too new to post publicly on a forum such as this, I don't want to push copyright issues too much. 

 

As everyone else has said - no seams :)

 

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#17 Philip_AMS

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 06:52 AM

The school meesterkleding is more about training more bespoke making skills, I know many of the student end up working in the atelier of the opera.

You could look at the Amsterdam fashion academy, I know they are running a summer course next week as they asked me to teach it, but Im working for a company so not sure if they found someone but have a look.
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#18 mhoyle

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 06:08 PM

The school meesterkleding is more about training more bespoke making skills, I know many of the student end up working in the atelier of the opera.

You could look at the Amsterdam fashion academy, I know they are running a summer course next week as they asked me to teach it, but Im working for a company so not sure if they found someone but have a look.

yes, Were I a bit younger and looking for an education, I would've loved to go there (or the Jeans school). I ended up studying history though. Shame I didn't realise back then the other possibilities :)

 

I had a look at the fashion academy. Next week is a bit tight, but maybe the part time course in pattern cutting later this year is good for me.


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