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Experienced Tailors needed at Alteration's Shop - Portland Oregon (USA)

tailor Seamstress Alterations custom suits

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#1 EMTailor1989

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 07:10 AM

Well established tailoring shop located in downtown Portland is looking for an experienced Tailor with experience working on both men's and women's garments. Able to do fittings is a plus. Flexible schedule.
 

If interested please reply to this post with your resume.  
 

Serious inquiries only.

 

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#2 dan93mendez

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Posted 13 December 2016 - 03:01 PM

Hello Silvian, 

 
I believe I sent you an email about this already, I randomly came across this posting when I googled "tailor trainee in portland." I included below my first email I sent out to you. I know i do not have any experience what so ever, but I do learn very quickly and I am serious about learning this art. I have a full time job which would restrict me to the weekends but I can adjust my schedule if need be. I hope you respond to this email and look forward to work. 
 
My name is Dan, this might be a long shot but no one ever gets anywhere without trying. I am unsure if this is the right way to go about this, but for some time now I have had a serious interest in making suits, mainly for myself but it is an art, and something that cannot be learned by watching videos over the internet(i have tried). 
 
However with every video I watch,every blog I have read, the conclusion always comes out the same, I need to learn from someone in person. I have tried looking at taking classes at the university but there is no class that can teach me what I need to know. My question to you is this; Do you need an apprentice? I would love to learn how to make suits, and the experience of learning would be payment enough. I do not wish to get paid, I just want to learn, and help you make suits. 
 
I know this is a long shot and must be an odd question but I figured I try anyways. I would really appreciate a response, maybe you're not looking for help now, but maybe down the road you might keep me in mind. 
 
Thank you, 
Dan Mendez

Edited by dan93mendez, 13 December 2016 - 03:01 PM.


#3 Terri

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Posted 14 December 2016 - 09:51 AM

I am going to chime in here because training has been a topic on my mind for some time now.
I was urged by a colleague to give someone they thought had potential, a chance to work with me, to get a foot in the door so to speak.
I had also recently seen a costume makers program in the UK connected to the National opera I think, and the tuition was £9000 per annum.

Now if I took someone on I would have to pay them minimum wage. I would be taking time out of my day to show them how to do things and I myself would produce less work or be slower at producing my work because I am spending time training someone. That costs me money overall. If they offered to commit to learning and I didn't pay them, financially for me it is better, but I still am slowed down in producing, and they don't have any financial incentive to stick around either.

Now if someone was willing to pay the equivalent of tuition to me that would be a different thing. The issue as I see it though, is I would need to have a pretty good sense of whether they would be successful in order to take them on. The educational system is willing to take anyone on who will pay them the fee, even if they turn out not to be suited for the industry so to speak.

So I guess the conundrum is how to identify potential successful learners, and would those people be willing to pay tuition to an individual rather than an institution.
Any thoughts?
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#4 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 14 December 2016 - 12:14 PM

Show them some of your work?


Me zo ganet e-kreiz ar mor 
Teir leo er-maez


#5 peterle

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Posted 14 December 2016 - 09:23 PM

I am going to chime in here because training has been a topic on my mind for some time now.
Any thoughts?

 

My first question would be: How did You learn it?

 

 

Here in Austria we have a dual system for learning a craft. The apprentices spent their time partly in the workshop to learn in practice and partly in a public vocational school where a lot of specific theory and things like bookkeeping are taught. The appretices are paid a very small fee called apprentices-compensation wich is a lot less than the minimum wage. So the burden (including unavoidable drop outs) to care for the next generation of craftsmen and women is shared between the public and the specific trade. An advantage of this system is, that the apprentices do share a common level of basic education in the trade but it´s also possible to teach them very specific abilities needed in  a certain workshop.


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#6 Terri

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Posted 14 December 2016 - 10:32 PM

That sounds similar to the system we have here for electrician apprentices and also for some other construction related trades.
At one point, my employers did take advantage of a government program, training 2 costume cutters, but dropped it since because it was too expensive. The "schooling portion" was time spent training with their mentor (me, and a ladies wear cutter) in our off season.

We are in a situation now where the industry needs more people to be trained, because there will be a huge number of people who are of retirement age, and management has really dropped the ball. Budgets are some of the issue.

As an individual, I would be willing to take someone on, especially if they were willing to pay "tuition" but otherwise I cannot afford to do that.


Seeing someone's work is a good start but there is a lot more involved to a commitment to train someone over a number of years.
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#7 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 15 December 2016 - 07:06 AM

That is very true Terri, I was thinking it would a reasonable way to approach a prospective mentor.


Me zo ganet e-kreiz ar mor 
Teir leo er-maez


#8 greger

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Posted 15 December 2016 - 05:20 PM

This kind of training, nowadays, really belongs in K-12 schools. Otherwise, look at Martin Stall. Martin must have payed the old tailor to teach him. And Martin, on his own time, worked hard to achieve. He must have had a side job to live on. I have a lot of respect for Martin. So, my advice is to ask around old folks homes to find a real tailor who will teach. Hostek lived in his house till he died. Ask around. Look in old phone books at the library to see if there any old tailors around. Some of those old tailors must be bored and would be glad to take on an apprentices, or at least give some pointers, now and then. When traveling stop and talk to tailors. DZ is a pretty good self learner, another way to gain ability.

 

There are a number of books that are recommended here that explain how to make pants, vest and coats. If a person made from each of them it seems to me that they would have some skills that might be payable. Making for the neighbor boys, with parents permission, perfection is not quite so important. Never let bad seams slip by. Hosteks coat book has information about fitting coat. If you are going to make errors children's clothes is where to make em. As Terri says, can't really pay people who are too green. 


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#9 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 20 December 2016 - 03:59 AM

I could have taught anybody, but there are no resources unless knowledge and no money to do so. But as long as I live, there is everything here, tools, books and love. I probably have the biggest library of cutting books on the American continents, in German language though. Everything is here waiting to be awoken. But, no money, no tailoring. It is like it is, the tailoring paradise is here in Houston sleeping so nicely… 


www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#10 Nitasha Gupta

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Posted 23 December 2016 - 04:43 PM

We stitch all types of dresses for ladies and kids. Same day delivery. Epitome Stitches are at your service to provide you with the best fit. Be it your wedding day, birthday or special occasion, we design dresses for making it a special one. One stop solution for all your tailoring services needs. 

 

http://epitomestitches.com/







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