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Italy Desparately Seeking Tailors


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#1 Sator

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 09:41 PM

It seems that Italy is not immune to the fact that it is more fashionable to go into IT or finance these days:

http://www.italymag....seeking-tailors

#2 Nishijin

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 10:25 PM

Well, if you have to choose between a high-tech prestigious and well-paid job, with not too much workload, and a small-paid, difficult job, not prestigious at all and with small pay, what is the rational choice ?

(that leave the question open : why am I leaving IT and choosing tailoring instead ? It seems I'm loosing reason ! :Nail Biting: )
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
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#3 Schneidergott

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 03:30 AM

Similar situation here in Germany. The few who go through the trouble of a 3 year apprenticeship are likely to move on to the RTW industry.
Problem is that you cannot pick any fool from the street to do the job (and according to latest education tests there would be plenty to choose from) of a tailor.
Even the dumbest of the dumb dream about a well paid job, preferably in the car industry (drug dealer and pimp might be desired as well, I don't know).
The education standards are so low, that many companies have great difficulties to find anyone with at least the minimum requirements.
We live in the dark age of mass stupidity. Long gone are the days of "Dichter und Denker"!

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#4 carpu65

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 04:02 AM

Yes,is sad but is so.
We arrive at this situation after many others countries (for exemple the France),but also in Italy today the young tailors are very few (almost in Naples).
In my city,Messina,the age is from 75 to 56 years.
The blame? of governments and of the fiscal policy for artisans.
Some tailors,in Naples and Rome are training chinese immigrants.
Are very good.

#5 jcsprowls

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 05:32 AM

Actually, Nishijin, that's the trend. People are taking "living retirements" at a certain point in their careers. They're looking for ways to find fulfillment.

I got my degree in business before I got a technical certificate in apparel. I worked several apparel-related jobs to pay for university. And, even though I have worked in "business" type jobs after graduation (insurance, software, product management), apparel has been a constant.

I'm quite loyal to this industry for many reasons. And, the simple fact of the matter is: I love it. And, I'm passionate about it. Sometimes you have to wander down a dozen roads before you find the right one. At least, that's what I tell myself!
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#6 Nishijin

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 06:06 AM

They're looking for ways to find fulfillment.


Well, I hope I'll find fulfillment, because for the present time, I sure find empty pockets :Doh:

Maybe the logical path would have been to get money before retirement !
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain

#7 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 01:45 PM

Similar situation here in Germany. The few who go through the trouble of a 3 year apprenticeship are likely to move on to the RTW industry.
Problem is that you cannot pick any fool from the street to do the job (and according to latest education tests there would be plenty to choose from) of a tailor.
Even the dumbest of the dumb dream about a well paid job, preferably in the car industry (drug dealer and pimp might be desired as well, I don't know).
The education standards are so low, that many companies have great difficulties to find anyone with at least the minimum requirements.
We live in the dark age of mass stupidity. Long gone are the days of "Dichter und Denker"!


So right SG, I am teaching substitute math in high school in Houston. The students mostly absolutely stupid, the education system is down the drain here.
5% go to college the rest end on welfare. And I have to step back as a tailor here cause German civil engineers are too stupid for this country. A German degree is worthless in USA. What do you expect when even a German cannot excepted to do the German teaching certificate because a German does not have 24h credit German language in the university degree. A German cannot teach German in America because the German is too dumb to speak German. Americans need English language credits in their college degrees. :crazy: Welcome to America – Welcome to stupidity. So I better tailor and make more money one day.

Edited by Der Zuschneider, 12 March 2010 - 01:47 PM.

www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#8 jcsprowls

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 02:24 PM

Americans need English language credits in their college degrees.

You want to know what's really sad? Every state requires X number of credit hours study in English Composition regardless of specialty. Personally, I think it's a crime to waste money in university to re-learn what you just got done learning in high school. I'm told that it's a safeguard.

In practical experience, though, corporate America re-remediates college graduates the first 3-5 years they're working. There are a lot of restless graduates who hop from job-to-job hoping they will luck into being placed higher on the ladder. Many hop for about 5 years before the rest of the working public begins to take them seriously.

I have a colleague I speak with on a regular basis. I tell her that I'm frustrated to have spent so much on a formal education only to find that I have rarely had to use it. I use more in my own business than I ever did in corporate America. How's that saying go? It's hard to soar like an eagle when you're surrounded by turkeys...
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web: http://www.studio9apparel.com
portfolio: http://www.behance.net/studio9apparel

#9 Schneidergott

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 03:24 AM

Honestly, I wouldn't mind working in Italy! The weather is (usually) much nicer than in Germany (and especially in this wet and windy region around Solingen).
And very often Italians are nice people, at least the ones I have met in the Tuscany area were.
There is a lack of tailors in the north of Germany, but there is also a lack of customers, and the ones who'd come to your shop are those who either try to find a bargain and/ or have been sent away by other tailors for special reasons. If I had been trained on SR it would be another story... :spiteful:

In Germany we were told for a long time that the USA are a country of unlimited possibilities where people are judged by what they are capable to do rather than their certificates. Apparently those days are gone?

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#10 jcsprowls

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 08:05 AM

Eh... kinda (?)

A certificate or degree is the price of entry into most professions. In quantitative professions (e.g. math, science, research, etc.) it's necessary in order to ensure the foundations skills of the candidate. In other professions, the certificate/degree demonstrates that you are capable of learning.

It still holds true more often than not that people get interviews based on education or credentials. But, they (mostly) get offers based on their track record and their network.

Performance still figures very prominently, here. But, your network is what makes things possible.
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web: http://www.studio9apparel.com
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#11 Schneidergott

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 01:36 AM

By Network you probably mean what in German is known as "Vitamin B" (in English it would be vitamin c, with c standing for connections)?
I see that in the company I work for. In the IT and e-commerce sector all the folks seem to know each other from university. :spiteful:

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#12 Schneidergott

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 05:46 AM

Maybe the Italian member(s) can answer my question:
Let's say that I would (theoretically ;) ) like to move and work in Italy (not necessarily the really big places), how should I apply for a job? What would they want to see? Certificates, work samples or what? I'm curious, just in case...

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#13 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 06:53 AM

Nooooo, you're coming here to set up shop in Hampsterdam :p
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#14 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 08:59 AM

Here in the states you just open a store and call it bespoke tailoring. It's that easy... But you need to be capable to do it or nobody will buy.

The most difficult part is to get a Green Card here.
www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#15 Schneidergott

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 06:56 AM

Nooooo, you're coming here to set up shop in Hampsterdam :p



Nah, doesn't come close to sitting on a nice, 500 years old sun-flooded piazza or balcony. Even Spain won't do!

Plus the Dutch language is not one of my favourites... :Big Grin:

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#16 jcsprowls

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 02:41 PM

I haven't really spent much time in Spain. I think it could be quite nice.

Florence was kinda nice. But, I worked so much I didn't really see much of it.
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web: http://www.studio9apparel.com
portfolio: http://www.behance.net/studio9apparel

#17 Sator

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 03:37 PM

Personally, I like Spanish olives better. I also like jamón better than prosciutto. :)

#18 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 05:23 PM

Plus the Dutch language is not one of my favourites... :Big Grin:


It's German with a sore throat :p
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!




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