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#1 Sator

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 11:18 AM

In the old days there was a hierachical system where newcomers swept the floors, then learned to make pockets etc and very slowly worked their way up the system. Has the sense of moving up in the organisation been lost today, due to rapid staff turnover?

How do you go about ensuring that staff have the oppurtunity to learn new techniques. How important do you see education in the industry - at all levels? Is it important that people have the feeling that they are growing, learning and improving on themselves or do you feel it is more important that they turn up, do their job and get paid? Corporations today have this sort of structure, but what of the garment making business?



#2 jcsprowls

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 02:55 PM

I think rapid turnover is proportional to the prices the market will bear. Factories in Denver pay about $8.50/hr, which is only slightly above the wages paid at a fast food restaurant. Because the wages are not competitive, the staff - as a whole - never gets off the learning curve because of the churn. To accompany that, the products have gotten increasingly dumber and sloppier. It's a very slippery slope.

In my past, it was my responsibility to learn. I was expected to either ask a co-worker or a supervisor and practice on my own until I mastered it. With the exception of patterns, this was typically an unpaid exercise. If I wanted to earn the highest piece rate, I had to stay late and practice increasingly complex operations so I could move to the front of the line.

One of my stitchers learned this way, too. She'll pull scraps of fabric out of the waste bin and practice. I asked her "how do you teach that?" Meaning: how do I teach someone that this is the desired behavior, attitude and aptitude? That they have a responsibility to master their domain?

I'm happy to cut samples for anyone who asks. The biggest hurdle I have is establishing a culture where learning & practicing are cherished. And, I'm stumped for how to do this. I sit beside these people practicing new or forgotten techniques over-and-over until I get it right. But, that seems to be too subtle to pull their attention away from their cellphones.

I'm considering developing a curriculum for one of the weekend days. Basically, I plan to convert the shop into a lab environment for a couple hours - no more than 1/2 day - for a series of weeks. My problem is that I cannot determine if it's appropriate to pay wages, too. Obviously paying wages does not entitle me to ask the staff to turn off their cellphones during working hours. I'm dubious if it also means I can require attendance, either.

__________

Edit to add: while the majority of factories in my area pay $8.50/hr, I pay $15. I'm more than a little miffed about the sense of entitlement I have received from former employees.
___________

Dir, Product Development

web: http://www.studio9apparel.com
portfolio: http://www.behance.net/studio9apparel

#3 Sator

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 06:34 PM

I think rapid turnover is proportional to the prices the market will bear. Factories in Denver pay about $8.50/hr, which is only slightly above the wages paid at a fast food restaurant. Because the wages are not competitive, the staff - as a whole - never gets off the learning curve because of the churn. To accompany that, the products have gotten increasingly dumber and sloppier. It's a very slippery slope.


Yes, that's a viscous cycle that can be hard to break. However, I know of research lab assistants who get paid similar hourly rates for doing very complex, high tech molecular and genetic work as they do working at the supermarket checkout counter. For the same pay, they'd rather do the demanding high tech stuff because it is challenging, forever progressing and personally more satisfying.

Garment making is the same. If you really get into it, you can be learning for the rest of your life. Clothing is an essential thing like food, and just as in the food industry, there is a tendency towards a fast food mentality in the garment industry. It's not for nothing that high end sewing in French is called haute couture, just as high end cooking is called haut cuisine. It takes a certain passion to make something special rather than greasy burgers and chips. It also takes a certain person to share that passion with others.

#4 Schneidergott

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 05:44 AM

Well, passion is one thing, but where can you find a teacher that shares this passion?
Whenever I listen to older colleagues I hear that they didn't start tailoring until their 2nd year. Before that is was mainly some minor work that had nothing to do with tailoring per se.
A very interesting read on this matter is the book "Abruzzi tailors": Apprentices (in general the weakest child which could not work on the fields or in physically demanding trades) had to stay 6 years with a master, who was not teaching them more than the basics because of fear to raise a competitor. Pretty much the same attitude all over the world, I guess. That's why the Brioni tailoring school was founded, the owners felt the need to cut down the years of apprenticeship to the necessary.
But you need more than passion to stay 3 years in a tailorshop, you need first of all the (financial) support of a third person.
In the olden days the masters got paid for taking an apprentice, after the war he had to pay a small amount to the apprentice, but that were mere peanuts compared to what other apprentices got in their trade.
We had a female apprentice at our tailorshop and once she had a talk with others about what she is doing and they were fascinated that she could actually shorten a sleeve. And those others were apprentices of the No.3 german bespoke tailor. Plus she got 500,- Euros per month, which was double of their pay.
I started my "tailoring career" rather late, i.e. with 23 after my spy training in the german forces. wink.gif
I got started in a local tailoring company, doing small jobs like cutting tapes or fusing. The owner thought of us as a severe cost factor, because he measured our skills according to the Refa system. He actually claimed that an apprentice cost him 20,- Deutschmark (I don't remember if per day or per hour).
Anyway, the company went bankrupt during my first month (not my fault!) and I had to look for something else. Nearby was a training facility for all kinds of trades and for dressmakers as well.
My sewing teacher was a nasty, ill tempered and badmouthing b*tch, who did not really know much about tailoring. Or if she did she would not pass it on. After I realized that I could not learn much from her I turned my attention to books about sewing and cutting and practised at home, doing pockets for a start and lapels later on.
I was kind of the best of the rest (or the one-eyed among the blind, if you like), so I got some extra work: Making 36 flaps and I think most of the welt pockets, which was good training.
I had changed the way she had taught us and the pockets looked good. When she had one of her many sick leaves (always a pleasure for us) I showed that method to one of the girls and she made the best pockets she had ever made (for what it's worth).
But when our teacher got back that girl must have told her about my "teaching", because we both got instantly "punished".
Why I am writing about this cray.gif period in my life? Because I truly believe that young people need to be encouraged rather than discouraged by all sorts of nasty little punishments. If they are willing to learn, teach them.
I guess no apprentice will mind sweeping the floor if had learned something new during the day. I find that "competitor" attitude absolutely wrong. If they don't learn anything they will leave anyway, so why not teach them well, so when they leave they can claim: I learned that from master X. I'm afraid much of knowledge has been lost through that attitude.
University students get a high level education almost for free (well, here in most European countries), why do craftsmen have to pay for their training? It is very costly to get the master degree (which entitled you to run your own workshop and train apprentices) and in most cases it won't even pay off.
@jcsprowls: Maybe you could do a training programme suitable for cell phones, at least the theory?!

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#5 jcsprowls

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 07:40 AM

For the same pay, they'd rather do the demanding high tech stuff because it is challenging, forever progressing and personally more satisfying.

Garment making is the same. If you really get into it, you can be learning for the rest of your life.



I can agree with this. It's part-and-parcel to what I mean to say: it takes a certain personality with a very specific set of virtues built in. Virtues, like: curiosity, personal excellence, craftsmanship, etc. - all things that cannot be taught.

Mechanics and techniques can be taught. But, if the person receiving the training doesn't possess the drive for personal excellence, they'll never master the training. In that instance, it's wasted time, effort & resources. As gram used to say: "casting pearls before swine."

But, I do need suggestions to attract the right candidates. After all, getting people to interview & audition is a marketing exercise. It's at least 80% of the battle. At this time, I can't justify a higher rate of pay. The quality of workmanship needs to be such that it commands the stronger rate before the customers will pay it.
___________

Dir, Product Development

web: http://www.studio9apparel.com
portfolio: http://www.behance.net/studio9apparel

#6 Schneidergott

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 02:19 AM

Mechanics and techniques can be taught.


I agree with that. So generally it should be possible to teach the basics to people who won't make a complete garment like in RTW and MTM, since the production of a garment is split up into many single operations.
But I actually doubt that those machine operators really know what to do and why. I have seen so many garments recently all showing the same defects that I wonder who is more responsible for that: The operator or the supervisor.
I don't have deep inside into that matter, but I guess price is more important than quality, unless the company's/ brand's reputation is at stake. And even then the labels can be exchanged.
If somebody asks me what my profession is and I answer: "Tailor" the usual reply is "Aha!", if I'm lucky even an "Aha, interessant", and that's about it.
They do job fairs now in Germany, which they have started only recently, so I guess they picked it up somewhere. Last one I saw was in a shopping centre in Bremen. All sorts of trades, but no tailors. Many positions for apprenticeships remain open, because many young people don't have the required qualification.
Back at fashion school many students didn't have any idea about sewing at all, and their designs were accordingly. S-shaped zippers in jackets, dresses without any opening or collars so big that they needed to be fastened to the hair of the model.
Fact is: Tailor/ cutter is not a favourite choice of young people. And even if they decided to become one: Where would they find a good teacher/ master tailor within the range of their living place? Might be easier in UK or Italy, but compared to those countries, Germany is a desert when it comes to tailoring.
It said in an article that in Germany exist 800 men's tailors. So even if you find one, you are most likely to be the only tailor apprentice for miles around, so there won't be any classes.

I'm sure that JefferyD and jcsprowls could really teach a lot of stuff to their students, but it seems that nobody is interested. Come to think of it: I wonder how many of the remaining old masters are actually good teachers. If the student has the curiosity and wants to understand "Why something is done that way" I'd say that the "Because it is done that way since 1xxx" might just not be enough.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#7 jcsprowls

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 07:51 AM

teach the basics to people who won't make a complete garment like in RTW and MTM, since the production of a garment is split up into many single operations.[/quote]

Actually, that's the problem. By parting out all the operations, we end up with a whole lot of people who know very little about the big picture. First-tier staff do whole garments. And, to be frank, I would never want it any other way.

In the factory I worked in the coat "pod" (for lack of a better word) was arranged in lines with each station having two machines set in an L configuration. Work was sent down the line in bundles. Most operators worked two machines. They opened the bundle, performed several operations, removed the stubs off the bundle control ticket, rebundled and moved it to the next station. If memory serves, we did about 35 coats per day with 8-10 people working 24 (?) machines.

In my shop, the pod is circular. Work travels around the outside of the circle, progressing from station-to-station. All the machines are on wheels, so we configure the pod around the product we're working on. If there is more than one operator, we work in tandem - usually next to each other. The bundles (and, the worker) progresses around the pod until all the operations (read: garment) are completed. The number of bodies in the pod is what affects the daily throughput.

It's basically a slightly modified progressive bundle system. It's easy to manage because if you need more volume, you add more bodies. Somewhere around 50 units per day is where this operating model falls apart, though. If I were to increase beyond that, I'd promote the progressive bundle system into a modified Toyota-style system.

The only style I'm currently doing production on is a knit karate uniform. It's an entry-level product. But, until I can acquire consistent staff and train them, I really can't solicit more complex styles (e.g. sportscoats, trousers, suits, etc.) from designers. And, I really want to. Thus, my quandry.

Jeffrey taught me an important lesson the other day. And, I'm glad he followed up with a post that was much more articulate than I was. I find that I end up un-learning something new everyday - still. That taping lesson was an fine example. It's a myth that it cannot be replicated in a production environment. How silly I was to buy into that. Now, I look back at the resources (i.e. tape) we wasted and I wonder why it was necessary.

My gram always said that mastery is measured by how much you need to give away in order to move up the next level. It takes many forms. It can range from giving away knowledge (i.e. being a mentor) or giving away tools that no longer serve you.
___________

Dir, Product Development

web: http://www.studio9apparel.com
portfolio: http://www.behance.net/studio9apparel

#8 jefferyd

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 09:01 AM

I once put up a brand new, semi-traditional half-canvas factory in a remote area where there was no skilled labor. As in, they had never seen a sewing machine ever. It was remote with high unemployment so we brought jobs, and were guaranteed low turnover by paying more than anyone could possibly make in the region. It took us almost a year to get anything sellable out of there, but in the context of things, that is extremely fast.

This is how we did it.

Every morning we would take in about twenty to thirty people and give them little tasks to do, and we would watch their hands. Stuff like drawing or folding or manipulating a toy. Some we would send packing right away and others we would keep based on what we saw in their dexterity. Then we would put them on a sewing machine with a piece of paper with a line and a curve on it, and ask them to try to follow the line and the curve; we didn't expect them to be able to, but some people freaked just trying and others seemed to be able to feel the machine better; then we'd give them a needle and ask them to replicate a few stitches and we'd watch their fingers. The ones we kept we knew to place in pressing operations or machine operations or hand sewing operations. The first batch of people just spent a month practicing on the machines on scrap fabric.

Then we cut 500 practice suits which would end up in the garbage so it didn't matter what mess they made. We taught them the first operations and would stay with them, having them do and redo, sew and rip, hundreds of times, until they could do their operation passably well. Then we'd take the best ones and pair them up with brand new people, to whom they would teach the operations they had learned, at first under our close supervision, and then under theirs- we would make them responsible for the work of the person they were training. This way we learned who would eventually be good supervisors and team leaders. Then we'd teach the older people new, harder operations. This went in sort of a pyramid fashion- within six months we had about 450 people in training. Because we didn't have to be operational we could take the time to train properly, and had the practice garments. The shortfall of most factories doing training is that they don't have this luxury- when they hire someone new they expect the person to be able to perform to standard within 3 weeks and then they are straight on to sellable garments.

This kind of assembly-line apprenticeship fast-tracks the learning process since they are repeating the same operation a hundred times a day, whereas traditional apprenticeships you do more operations, but fewer of them at a time, and the learning curve is much steeper and longer. We ended up with a lot of people who only knew a few operations (they were required to know all the operations surrounding theirs) and also many who knew the process start to finish, which is the ideal.

The problem with learning cutting is that it's not done in this sort of assembly-line fashion so takes longer, and most people who are inclined and ambitious enough to want to learn want to learn fast. I am very much of the old school of thought that it is best to start picking up pins and then doing simple operations, and getting to know each step thoroughly before proceeding to the next; unfortunately it is quite rare to find somebody wit the tenacity and perseverance required- I think the old-school style of apprenticeship was also a way to weed out those who were not willing to give enough and to work hard enough because god knows, it is not an easy trade.




#9 jcsprowls

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 01:43 PM

Mass hiring methods are plausible. And, they can be scaled down. I will talk to several county authorities to see if there are job training programs for the manufacturing sector. I know there was talk of building programs in all three neighboring counties – I was invited to several meetings. Last I heard, these counties rescinded their budget. Maybe I can convince them that manufacturing is a worthy investment?

I agree that practice garments are necessary. I plan to start with a dozen units per participant. We will, of course, start with scaled down samples, like 12” squares w/ a match stripe, sleeve setting samples, etc. to develop foundation skills.

Train the trainer is the only way I can think of to build a company from the ground-up. My immediate goal is to get two principles who will be fully-trained in all operations – including cutting, bundling and marking – by the end of next year. They will take turns training subsequent staff in later expansions.

You say that 450 candidates tested into training. How many were retained when that facility eventually opened? In my experience, mass hiring techniques aim to retain the top 30% of the initial crew with the assumption of cutting another 20% by month #9. IOW: Did you start with 450, weed down to 150 at open and trim to a final 120?

Even if the workers demonstrate expertise over a portion of their domain, it’s something that can be worked with. At some point, you can put these folks through remedial training and reinforce that by putting the entire pod on a desk rotation schedule (e.g. 1 mo on Op_X, 1 mo on Op_Y, etc.). Once the entire factory is cross-trained, you can either change the workflow model or continue to rotate desks in order to level out the pay.


___________

Dir, Product Development

web: http://www.studio9apparel.com
portfolio: http://www.behance.net/studio9apparel

#10 Schneidergott

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Posted 05 June 2009 - 06:21 AM

I'm curious: Do factories cut down on quality control? From the look of it I'd say a few don't, like Samuelsohn and Brioni, to mention only a few.
But from what I have seen in the past years in the shops makes me think that quality control is not well executed or even totally skipped.
I'm sure that in the better factories the models are tested before they are produced and the staff is instructed accordingly.
No big deal with well trained staff which can perform any kind of operation that may occur. But what about the others, where you'll find staff without any proper qualification for that job? Don't they check their products any more, so in case something is found on a regular basis it can be sorted out?
Here are 2 examples. Both coats were made by a big RTW factory in Goslar, so one would think they can do better. The first coat itself did fit well for MTM, only flaw was this (we see a lot of coats with that defect in the right back, hence my question):



It should be easy to teach the operator how to avoid this, shouldn't it?

Now here is something that applies to the cutting room staff:



The cap height misses about 1,5cm at least. So the people responsible either do not know better or they do, but don't care. I would not know which is worse.
For comparison:



And then there is this from another maker:



Could you think of any reason why this left their shop?



"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#11 jcsprowls

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Posted 05 June 2009 - 07:58 AM

Ooh. Um... ouch.

Let me ruminate.

___________

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#12 greger

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Posted 05 June 2009 - 05:32 PM

Factory work seems kinda boreing. What is the point of learnig to do a few seams, or only pressing, or a few hand stitches. No wonder why so many people walk away. And, at that, a low paying job. It seems to me getting them involved from beginning to end, like with some pares of pants, and then a shirt or two would help on the attention span, instead of practic and throw away. When you give them something to wear that they made it is more than just a being there for a pay check. But, even then you would have to weed out lots.

So many wages are so low that these people end up in the soup line because ends don't meet. After awhile they figure out, "Why slave away at some thankless job and be at the soup line anyway?" The apprentices of old at least walked away with clothes or shoes to wear. If you were becoming a baker at least at home you have fine bread. The heart of the problem is so many people have nothing to show for their labor. The apprentice of old had something to be proud of, they knew the big name people who wore their clothes. Today so many people have nothing at the end- they are just nothing. What can you do with three or four seams? So many factories treat people like worthless animals. So many apprentices of the old days started as children who never got payed except what they learned to make was theirs. When they were old enought to pull their weight they had the skill.

#13 jefferyd

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Posted 05 June 2009 - 09:47 PM

Factory work seems kinda boreing. What is the point of learnig to do a few seams, or only pressing, or a few hand stitches. No wonder why so many people walk away. And, at that, a low paying job. It seems to me getting them involved from beginning to end, like with some pares of pants, and then a shirt or two would help on the attention span, instead of practic and throw away. When you give them something to wear that they made it is more than just a being there for a pay check.


I disagree. At the end of a short period of time, they are able to make an unwearable, mediocre pair of trousers from start to finish, or they are able to completely master a few steps, which builds confidence. From there they have the confidence to try to learn more, harder steps. The old way, it can take five years before you are able to produce anything wearable and this leads to greater rates of discouragement and abandon, IMO.

The heart of the problem is so many people have nothing to show for their labor. The apprentice of old had something to be proud of, they knew the big name people who wore their clothes. Today so many people have nothing at the end- they are just nothing. What can you do with three or four seams? So many factories treat people like worthless animals.


It sounds like you have had some negative experiences- please share with us what factories you worked at that treated people like this.

#14 Schneidergott

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 04:38 AM

In the (g)olden days a tailor apprentice was usually the weakest child (who couldn't do farm, mining or factory work) and the parents had to pay the master to take him in. An apprenticeship usually took several years, not being much more than sweeping the floor, threading needles and keeping the charcoal iron hot. And the pride about sewing a suit for the POW won't fill your stomach.
The money even the best bespoke tailor got for his work was very much below any pay in the industry, which is the reason why so many bespoke tailors and dressmakers (at least here in Germany) defected to the RTW industry. The pay was triple, work was clean and in a much healthier environment and working hours much less.
I don't want to deny that workers in the clothing industry are under pressure, especially here in the west because of the strong competition from asian countries. But that is a self-made misery.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#15 greger

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 06:09 AM

I disagree. At the end of a short period of time, they are able to make an unwearable, mediocre pair of trousers from start to finish, or they are able to completely master a few steps, which builds confidence. From there they have the confidence to try to learn more, harder steps. The old way, it can take five years before you are able to produce anything wearable and this leads to greater rates of discouragement and abandon, IMO.

It sounds like you have had some negative experiences- please share with us what factories you worked at that treated people like this.


Never worked in a clothing factory. It seems to me many people in low paying jobs don't get much if any satisfaction from their jobs. They are there for the checks, that's all.

You were saying that you made people do something and take it apart and redo until they got it done right. When it is done right it can be nice and wearable. In fact it can be and should be better than some of what I have see in stores (not high-end stores). There was one group of tailors where the boys started their apprenticeship before the age of six (six and older the hands unteachable, so they say; they also said to six and older who came to start, "We don't know you."). Once they get started nobody is going to buy or make clothes for them anymore. Set the kid on the table and show him how to do dead on straight stitches, which doesn't take long. As soon as he can do that straight to trousers. A few hip pockets for practice when he comes to that. And so the process goes. There comes along a time wihen the child gets included in making parts of sellable goods. This groupe of tailors never allowed sewing machines until about 1922. The proper demands and instruction makes very nice clothes from the beginning. In these tailor shops you will never find seconds. Factory work is a different world. But I would still start them out with sewing machine, shorts with zipper, front and back pockets and waistband. It builds skill. It makes them comfident. It gives aim- something wearable. Be demanding by not letting slop pass. So what if they have to sew and resew and resew until they get it right (since you know they are going to mess up on each seam several times set the thread tension so top or bottom thread lays flat- it is easy to pull out that way for a redo). Doing this is seems like it would take less time than a year. With specialized machines, your method is probably way better.

#16 jefferyd

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 07:00 AM

The money even the best bespoke tailor got for his work was very much below any pay in the industry, which is the reason why so many bespoke tailors and dressmakers (at least here in Germany) defected to the RTW industry. The pay was triple, work was clean and in a much healthier environment and working hours much less.


In North America, it's a union wage with benefits, including health care and pension- no tailor shop could offer those. The operators are taught that, like the many tiny pieces of a watch, each person plays an important role, and if any of those pieces stop or malfunction, the watch stops. The end result, good or bad, is a team effort. Those who choose to see it as a job and a cheque will remain where they are; those who show drive and initiative are quickly advanced within the organization.

#17 jcsprowls

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 08:01 AM

I'm not aware of unions. But, that might be the nature of shops I work with. I do know that Canadian shops are much better regulated than in the US because labor laws are actually enforced (I digress).

To Schneidergott's point. I posted elsewhere on the forum that I earned about double what I earned in a tailor shop and worked much less hours to get it. The factory environment also provided the ability to practice my craft because there was a constant stream of work.

I also agree with Jeffrey. Anyone who reports to work in a factory just to collect a paycheck limits himself. As long as there's room for mediocrity, a desk will be provided. At some point, though, it catches up; and, the factory needs to oust that person to make room for someone who possesses a better disposition.
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#18 Schneidergott

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 02:24 AM

I just don't know where I have that booklet (late 30's) right now, but it contained an interview with Willi Staben, Hamburg.
He explained why he had changed the setup of his bespoke business to groupwork.
Before, every tailor was working on one garment from start to finish. We all know, that each one has a bigger talent for different tasks, for example one is good at pockets, the other one at sleeves. So each garment looked different.
The benefits of groupwork, according to Herr Staben, were:
Each tailor could do what he was best at. The cutter was cutting, the next one made the canvas and so on, you get the picture.
Plus, so Herr Staben, if there were changes in style and making, he would have to explain them only to the person affected, not to each single tailor.
He was able to make more garments of constant higher quality in less time and his tailors got more money.
Does anybody know what it's like in (larger) SR companies and others around the globe? From the look of it I'd guess that each tailor is making a complete garment, but I might be wrong about that.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.





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