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#1 beaubrummel

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 02:25 AM

So I've been lucky enough to study two different trades from two masters and the trouble I've been having is trying to figure out which path to put my full commitment into. Tailoring has a bit of a leg up because I have been studying and practicing it longer, but that aside, the question still remains. 

 

I'm trying to look at it not just from a personal standpoint, because they are both crafts I greatly enjoy and can see pursuing. But also from a business and economic standpoint. There has been a change in consumer behavior when it comes to clothing and such, but lets face it, the target customer is going to be unique and for the most part a more wealthy clientele either way. Both markets have seen growth in the past few years, and that trend is continuing to increase. 

 

In any case, its something i've been giving a lot of thought lately. Any advice?


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#2 jukes

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 06:00 AM

I also have two trades, and chose the other one for financial reasons, although personal preference would have been tailoring.
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#3 greger

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 07:03 AM

A few tailors do both. So, one trade is on the side. If tailoring is the one on the side you can be very picky in choosing customers. Maybe you make something, on average, every other month. That way you keep your hand in it and your skill. It also provides opportunity to teach your children the trade. Four and five year olds there fingers haven't stiffened up, so easily teachable, and their minds are empty, just right for teaching.
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#4 Henry Hall

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 10:24 AM

Is it likely the resurgent trend (for that is the word) in clothing will be long-term enough, and a broad enough customer base, to justify pouring one's life and financial future into it?

Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

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#5 Schneidergott

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 05:10 PM

I've been told that, if unsure about a decision, you should toss a coin.

By the time it's up in the air you will know what you hope it will be... :Praying:


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"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

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#6 beaubrummel

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 11:55 PM

Is it likely the resurgent trend (for that is the word) in clothing will be long-term enough, and a broad enough customer base, to justify pouring one's life and financial future into it?

 

Its hard to quantify that, however the trend of menswear is outpacing womenswear and there is a lot of room for growth. I should also note, on the shoemaking side, I definitely see more potential economically, but it would be a tougher start and essentially from scratch where as I have had more time in studying tailoring, and my mentor has mentioned about taking over his shop. I find it to be a great honor but also a big responsibility in many aspects. Its a big head start to already have a list of customers, but I am not him, so there's bound to be some customers who will not stay. There is also the existing shop, and overhead and what already exists, some workers may not like change. On the other side of that coin, sometimes a fresh take on things can be a welcome one. 


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#7 Henry Hall

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 06:01 AM

The trend of ready-to-wear menswear is ascending, without a doubt. Is the patronage of tailors ascending in equal measure? The sort of fellow who would see a tailor or book an appointment with a 'clothier' would likely have been doing so whatever the state or trend of the consumer market, because he is that sort of customer and belonging to quite a small regular group.

I don't quite believe that #menswear translates into a thriving trade for tailors. It is a bigger win for the marketing of those whose products are made in the hundreds or the thousands (per day). The 21st century consumer wants things yesterday and at a certain price, despite what a lot of internet folk say.

Who am I though? If someone was dropping an entire going concern into my lap, I might think twice.
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Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#8 tailleuse

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 06:08 AM

 

Its hard to quantify that, however the trend of menswear is outpacing womenswear and there is a lot of room for growth. I should also note, on the shoemaking side, I definitely see more potential economically, but it would be a tougher start and essentially from scratch where as I have had more time in studying tailoring, and my mentor has mentioned about taking over his shop. 

 

Is the other craft shoemaking? Could you take over the shop, continue to learn shoemaking with the goal of one day offering bespoke shoes to customers?  Or is that too much for a presumably one-person shop?


Edited by tailleuse, 21 January 2015 - 06:09 AM.

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#9 beaubrummel

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 10:07 AM

 

Is the other craft shoemaking? Could you take over the shop, continue to learn shoemaking with the goal of one day offering bespoke shoes to customers?  Or is that too much for a presumably one-person shop?

Yes, the other craft is shoemaking. Taking over is a possibility, and that goal would be ideal, but even though it's not a one person shop it does seem like it would be difficult to run both. Then again, I don't know that for sure. 

 

And to reply to you Henry, I agree, which is where the dilemma comes. As much of a resurgence in menswear as there has been, it's hard to say if it's really impacting tailors in the right way. I hear so often of work being moved overseas for so many companies just for extra money and it puts added pressure on tailors to compete in an environment where the margins are already thin. 

 

And that's not to say that shoemaking is on the opposite side either. Especially with custom work. But I think there is more opportunity in that craft for future growth. 


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#10 greger

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 07:42 PM

It is hard to know where men's clothing is going. Hippies are retiring like dying flies. Before the Hippies there were lots of rules about clothes. Seems like the young need some rules and they are starting to create them. To many rules to no rules leaves a vacuum because there needs to be some structure. Just not to much. If you were white collar climbing the ladder then tailored Clothing was the way to go. I think that rule is coming around again, now that the young have discovered the world of tailors. After all who wants to be stuck only with what is on the rack?
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#11 tailleuse

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 05:43 AM

 If you were white collar climbing the ladder then tailored Clothing was the way to go. I think that rule is coming around again, now that the young have discovered the world of tailors. After all who wants to be stuck only with what is on the rack?

 

True, but don't forget that in many industries dressing down is a sign of success.  In addition, many career paths aren't as well defined as inthe past, people often have to work more than one job concurrently or consecutively, and as they have to be more independent they're less willing to adopt a "Man in the Gray Flannel" suit attitude about clothing.  Conformity no longer means security.


Edited by tailleuse, 22 January 2015 - 05:44 AM.

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#12 greger

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 08:46 AM

Even computer programmers are starting to dress up whereas before they were notorious in jeans. Some that are hiring are hiring those who are dressing better and if you are the computer programmer and you want the job you dress according to getting the job. So it is becoming not there choice anymore. Demands are demands which needs to be meat. If you are under a certain age this is all new to you.
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#13 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 11:52 PM

It seems to me that there are far fewer shoemakers than tailors. Maybe the potential is greater??

 

When I discuss my interest in tailoring, I always get a few who ask if I will be shoe making. I believe there could be a market.

 

The decision would be easier if the alternatives were tailoring vs banking or tailoring vs burger flipping. (I don't mean to be rude at all but if you are anything like me your heart is unfortunately set on highly skilleddifficult and arcane arts that the world is sadly forgetting.)


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#14 tailleuse

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 01:49 AM

Even computer programmers are starting to dress up whereas before they were notorious in jeans. Some that are hiring are hiring those who are dressing better and if you are the computer programmer and you want the job you dress according to getting the job. So it is becoming not there choice anymore. Demands are demands which needs to be meat. If you are under a certain age this is all new to you.

 

I don't know. The marketplace still seems very disordered and unpredictable to me.  Even if formerly predominantly casual fields are becoming more formal, that doesn't necessarily mean that their professionals are willing to pay for bespoke.


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#15 ChiTownTailor

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 02:11 AM

Young men are going to realize that wearing a nice tailored suit has its perks...

Attached Files


Edited by ChiTownTailor, 23 January 2015 - 02:16 AM.

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-There might be a lot of tweed merchants out there making a bodger, but I'm sure not one of them. I'd rather be kicking my heels than making a pork on the mangle. No crushed beetles to be found here!

#16 jukes

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 04:18 AM

Young men are going to realize that wearing a nice tailored suit has its perks...

 

She,s his tailor, showing him how the jacket should be worn on a hot day.


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#17 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 07:23 AM

 

She,s his tailor, showing him how the jacket should be worn on a hot day.

 

 

Down Boy!!


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#18 tailleuse

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 10:34 AM

Young men are going to realize that wearing a nice tailored suit has its perks...

 

 

I see lots of nicely dressed women with guys in jeans, chinos, non-ironic-ironic baseball caps, and sneakers -- they do spend money on prestige sports sneakers.  A lot of men are still trying to live as permanent adolescents.


Edited by tailleuse, 23 January 2015 - 01:58 PM.

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