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American Bespoke Tailoring Academy


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#1 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 03 January 2019 - 11:41 AM

Enrolment is now open at The American Bespoke Tailoring Academy in Dallas Tx, The Academy is started by Marlene Franke who studied under Andrew Ramroop. This first series is on Cutting and Fitting. The syllabus looks solid and will definitely be a great start to a career in tailoring.

Check it out at:
https://the-abta.com/
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#2 Henry Hall

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 07:03 PM

Was she an actual apprentice of his or a graduate of his Savile Row Academy?


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#3 Henry Hall

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 07:02 PM

I guess no-one knows then.


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#4 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 01:24 AM

Does it matter? She has experience, been certified and offering a service no one else is in America.
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#5 Henry Hall

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 02:54 AM

Does it matter? She has experience, been certified and offering a service no one else is in America.

 

I merely asked if she was a regular apprentice or a graduate of Andrew Ramroop's course. I don't know if those course students also make for his clients like regular apprentices would. Wouldn't you say there was a difference?


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#6 Terri

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 11:55 PM

I think there is a big difference between apprenticing for x number of years as opposed to taking a course.

I dont know any thing about this person so I am not making a personal criticism, but generally if someone is paying money for courses, most often the institution or teacher rarely refuses the money because the student is not up to par or ultimately suitable (hah) to do the job at a high level.
An apprenticeship to me is much different because there is an investement of the instructor's/ business' time/money and they are not likely to keep someone on who is not performing up to standard.
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#7 Terri

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 12:01 AM

The other thing that I noticed missing from the website at that link is information about the instructor.
I would want to see at least a bit of a resume and teaching credentials, as well as photos of actual work done being worn by the clients, not just jackets on a stand, or a portion of a garment on a table.

Edited by Terri, 08 January 2019 - 12:03 AM.

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#8 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 02:17 PM

Just do the 6 months program and have some fun with it. I made crane certificates for 10 000$ to have some fun and make more money than a tailor. Why should someone not do tailor curses for 10k. If you got no money, you never will get anything. Once I have a load of money again, I am going to have some fun with those curses and pretend to be an idiot and check them out. LOL

 

Everybody knows, with those tailor curses and certificates nobody will hire you anyway. Either you have your own business or you go to a university later in a design field, you just learn for your own fun only.


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#9 Henry Hall

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 08:42 PM

So you approve of people swindling others into taking a course with no prospects for employment? :huh:  Maybe 'pretend' was optimistic.


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#10 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 02:55 AM

Wow, what has this forum come to with all the negativity?

 

I have no horses in this race, however, I wanted to give a PSA to an opportunity that is finally available here in America. I am a little shocked and dismayed at the close-minded responses made in ignorance. I do agree with Terri on most of her observations, Yes, the instructor needs to post a lot more of her work and told her so, though a lot of what I seen are not photographed professionally so believe she withholds those as she wants her endeavour to be professional in all aspects. Secondly, she and I have discussed the other issue you present and it course IS pass/fail, payment of tuition does NOT guarantee issuance of certification. She is quite passionate about this academy and realises that those who complete her course are reflections of her and will not compromise her integrity and pursuit of perfection in the trade. Now on to my view...

 

I think every prospective student looking to learn tailoring should enquire on their own and make their own decisions based upon their own needs and wants. She's recently added shorter courses to better tailor to the needs and wants of a prospective student. However, the full course will give the student a much more rounded and in-depth study into the trade.  Not to mention a HELL OF A LOT LESS EXPENSIVE  than going to the UK for 3-4-6 months for American students. 

 

I will tell you I have spoken with Marlene in length, seen the prospectus and course outlines, and seen a lot of her work. Given my observations, I am confident she can give the serious student a solid foundation to go forth in the trade. Will they leave the full course full on master tailors? of course not! That is not the goal nor scope of such training. The scope of this or any other program be it London Academy of Bespoke, Andrews Savile Row Academy, Rory's Handcraft Academy or even the illustrious Tailor and Cutter Academy (whos diploma many successful tailors hung with pride in their shops) are only meant to give the student a solid foundation and base proficiency to move forward. As for job prospects, she is working to towards partnering with firms to help with job placement. We, ourselves, are hoping to draw from their graduates as we continue to grow and need more skilled labour. A pool which I assure you is severely lacking here in America. 

 

I must say, this archaic notion that in order to become a tailor, one has to become an indentured apprentice for 3-5 years is just hog's wallop. A fundamental foundation can surely be had in a relatively short time, especially if the student is serious and has a certain disposition and aptitude towards the trade. However, Im just a guy behind a computer screen so I will leave you with the words of A.W. Allon in his treatise "How To Start A Career In Tailoring".

 

"... it is possible to learn the 'fundamentals' of the craft in a relatively short period. Once he has acquired those fundamentals, he can rely on an accumulation of experience and his own particular aptitude to help him improve to the point of qualification. For, have no doubt about it, those with the greatest aptitude will find the greatest success." 

 

"[Trade schools] ...are turning out some extremely proficient young men- and in a much shorter time than one can expect from an indentured apprenticship.

 

The reason for the relatively short short time that is taken by the schools is that they are teaching 'all the time', and the student is not wasting valuable periods in sweeping out the shops, running errands, making tea, or doing all the other little jobs that have become an offshoot of the apprentice's life in any trade."

 

"The instruction given at the Tailor and Cutter Academy is regarded very highly in the trade itself. It is considered that students leaving the Academy after a six months' course will have knowledge and usefulness equal to that of the average learner or apprentice who had been indentured for three years; and can ask equal pay. This speaks volumes for the farsighted policy and spirit of progress actuating the leading personalities in the industry."

 

In closing, it is possible to gain a solid foundation and proficiency in the trade at such a school. There are opportunities for those who have these base skills. Finally, the prospective student should make their own enquiries into such a school and see if it would be a benefit to them. Don't take the embittered words of random people behind a screen that have no knowledge of whats being presented deter you from your search for knowledge. 


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#11 Henry Hall

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 04:30 AM

Closed-minded? (not close-minded). I think you're being a bit quick there old bean. It wasn't negativity, it began as a very simple and honest question about whether she was a regular apprentice of Andrew Ramroop or had been through his Savile Row Academy course as a student.

There is a legitimate question to be asked because their IS a difference between people who have gone through a difficult apprenticeship and people who do courses. It's not a hard-and-fast distinction, everyone is different, but in this world of uncertainty it's good to know the background.

 

I went to the site and, like Terri, saw very little. A lot of enormous 404 pages. I understand, people set up a website and it needs to be fully completed. Maybe it's a bad idea to start marketing with so little to see? That's all.

 

I am not advocating the indentured apprentice system. In fact I've said as much in threads here in the past. I'm not a proper apprentice. I've scraped scarce time and money into opportunities I've found (among which an aged German tailor; a night school). I'd love for there to be a cognate of the old Tailor & Cutter academy here which I could have attended.

 

I didn't chat to Marlene so I didn't have your insight. Perhaps you could have posted a bit of the extra info. I'm happy to hear of any new tailoring operations anywhere. Maybe if the dearth of tailoring in your adopted home bothers you so greatly, upping sticks again wasn't such a great idea?


Edited by Henry Hall, 16 January 2019 - 04:31 AM.

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#12 greger

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 06:11 PM

Book learning is not the same as hands on. How many fail school or apprenticeship? Take downhill skiing. Would you rather learn from an instructor right there, or a book. An instructor, if he/she is good will  see your errors immediately and tell you correction so you don't develop bad habits. Whereas, with the book you may not even know your errors, much more, what to do with them. How many savil row tailors went to college, got a tailors degree, or similar, and then spent 5-7, 8 years going through an apprentice? Some of this is book learnable, but some of this you will be far ahead by apprenticeship.


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#13 Henry Hall

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 08:07 PM

To be fair Greger, the lady in question has been tutored by a master tailor with hands-on training.


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#14 Henry Hall

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 11:17 AM

Here's another academy, in Macclesfield, which seems to be running from, or with the assistance of Hirsch Tailoring (a bespoke tailor I hadn't heard of before). They employ the ABC diploma, which is the system used by the Savile Row Bespoke Association and it can also be study grant supported.

 

The cost of the 'level 5' course is a hefty £10,000; well... you get £750 change from that sum. It appears to be for only six months. There is another one at 'level 3' for £4000. It's only four months so that's a grand a month. Half the course can be grant-supported.

 

Something in the North of England for a change instead of concentrated in the capital city.

 

This is the address:

 

  The Tailoring Academy
Pickford St Mill, 3rd Floor
Pickford Street
Macclesfield SK11 6JD


Edited by Henry Hall, 18 January 2019 - 11:18 AM.

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#15 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 05:56 AM

The abta-School ask for 13250$/6 months course. You need another 6000$ for living in Dallas + a car. Don't know who has so much money? There is no job after the course. You on your own with a nice trade.


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#16 Henry Hall

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 06:22 AM

I have a friend in Houston. I visited him when he previously lived in Wichita. He dislikes Texas a lot, but still lives there. He says all the tailors are Vietnamese. Though I believe Chris Despos is in Texas.


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#17 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 08:35 AM

I have a friend in Houston. I visited him when he previously lived in Wichita. He dislikes Texas a lot, but still lives there. He says all the tailors are Vietnamese. Though I believe Chris Despos is in Texas.

 That is correct. There are 4 tailors in Houston and hundreds of Asians.


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#18 Youngsarto

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 11:01 PM

I have no skin in the game but on the schools website there is a picture of a suit coat where the welt pocket slant is backwards. Its high side is by the lapel and it slopes down towards the arm scye. Might be the new style but that is not how I was trained to make a barchetta. I have always lived under the rule those who can, do. And those who cant, teach.

Edited by Youngsarto, 26 January 2019 - 11:02 PM.

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