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Learning to Tailor by Self Tuition- (Beginners Please Read)


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#55 tailleuse

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 07:50 AM

Yes, for the basics of hand sewing, you can use any book that shows them.
And hint : there are even some scans here on the forum.
There are also scans of old sewing manuals on the Internet which describe how to hand sew. Nothing has change since the 1920s. Actually, those books frequently explain some details that are not talked about in modern books.

BTW, if my memory's right, Cabrera does not include the basics of hand sewing.

If Cabrera becomes unavailable, then we will have to recommend Sam Hostek's books. They are very, very good, but the organisation of the books makes them less user-friendly for beginners.



BTW, I just bought Cabrera's ladies tailoring, it has been shipped yesterday. So I will have both now. I bought it from Amazon.fr


Nishijin:

Cabrera does not cover hand sewing as far as I can recall either. The Hostek book is very good, and there have been at least a couple of excellent out-of-print books that have been scanned and posted on the forum.

With Hostek, it's not just the organization, it's the price. When I received that pricey PAMPHLET -- it's not even a book -- in the mail I was a bit dismayed. But then I thought, the folks at Cutter and Tailor must think highly of this book or else they wouldn't have recommended it.


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#56 jukes

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 08:58 PM

Nishijin:

Cabrera does not cover hand sewing as far as I can recall either. The Hostek book is very good, and there have been at least a couple of excellent out-of-print books that have been scanned and posted on the forum.

With Hostek, it's not just the organization, it's the price. When I received that pricey PAMPHLET -- it's not even a book -- in the mail I was a bit dismayed. But then I thought, the folks at Cutter and Tailor must think highly of this book or else they wouldn't have recommended it.



Does it matter what form the information is in ? its the content that is worth the money, don't forget Hosteks books were originally for college students which is probably the reason for the way they are put together. The information contained in these books is worth far more than the cost, when they are compared to something like MTOC.

#57 Nishijin

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 09:46 PM

How right is Jukes !

Learning is never free. Stanley Hostek's books contain a lot of information that is published nowhere else. And the whole set (4 books) is only 90$. Free shipping in the US. The vest book is 20$ only ! It may be the only book available today explaining how to make a canvased waistcoat. (Cabrera fuses his fronts). OK, it's "only" a 26 pages leaflet. So what ? It's only 26 pages because there is no need for more.

People nowadays care too much about the looks, and not enough about what's inside. And then, some pay huge prices for old books that aren't even relevant for contemporary tailoring.

If you think the price is too high, think of how much you will spend of cloth that will end in the bin because you have tried without quality guidance and got as a result something that can't be worn.
http://www.paulgrassart.com

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
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#58 Youngsarto

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 02:20 AM

90$ for 4 books with that type of info is a steal! My training cost me tens of thousands(that includes living expense). And I'm no where near good enough.

Edited by Youngsarto, 03 July 2012 - 02:22 AM.


#59 jukes

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 03:52 AM

90$ for 4 books with that type of info is a steal! My training cost me tens of thousands(that includes living expense). And I'm no where near good enough.


Did you manage to find a placement ??

#60 Youngsarto

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 06:55 AM

No, I am going at it alone. Slowly slowly but I have to admit I have never learned so much so quickly. I have also remembered more than I imagined.

Edited by Youngsarto, 03 July 2012 - 06:56 AM.


#61 jukes

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 11:39 PM

No, I am going at it alone. Slowly slowly but I have to admit I have never learned so much so quickly. I have also remembered more than I imagined.


Good for you, i hope you do well.

#62 amateursarto

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 06:00 AM

Hostek's books aren't the most well designed, but he has construction of pockets that I didn't even know existed! His trouser book is great too because it shows how to construct with an extended waist and no band. I just started a new job but when the training ends in a month or so, I will dive into my coat project and I plan to use Hostek. For someone who has intermediate sewing experience (me) it's not too hard to understand Hostek. Plus you can scan to your computer if you want, clean up text, and save to your hard drive permanently if you choose too. It's really a priceless resource.
AMATEURSARTO

#63 tailleuse

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 08:50 AM

Does it matter what form the information is in ? its the content that is worth the money, don't forget Hosteks books were originally for college students which is probably the reason for the way they are put together. The information contained in these books is worth far more than the cost, when they are compared to something like MTOC.



I always appreciate a sturdy binding, good paper, in other words, a BOOK. Hey, I'll probably buy the whole series when I have a need, but they are pamphlets.

I can't recall what "MTOC" stands for.

Edited by tailleuse, 05 July 2012 - 08:51 AM.

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#64 tailleuse

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 08:55 AM

How right is Jukes !

Learning is never free. Stanley Hostek's books contain a lot of information that is published nowhere else. And the whole set (4 books) is only 90$.


Nishijin, in the U.S. the "{:content:}quot; [cent] sign goes in front of the numeral, the"¢" follows. I wish the set was 90¢ instead of $90. Posted Image I have invested thousands in my sewing education so far (classes, supplies, books, fabric). No one could accuse me of being cheap.

I just paid $60 for the women's version of the Cabrera book. For a paperback. I relied on Sartor's statement that this version does not largely duplicate the menswear version.

Edited by tailleuse, 05 July 2012 - 09:03 AM.

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#65 tailleuse

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 09:03 AM

90$ for 4 books with that type of info is a steal! My training cost me tens of thousands(that includes living expense). And I'm no where near good enough.


I'm glad to hear that you believe the material presented is unique. As I said, I have a fair number of sewing books already. I bought the first Hostek book because this forum recommended it and I respect the opinions here.



Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#66 killdeer

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 12:06 PM

Hello all,

I'd just like to add (as a beginner) that I've had great success picking up materials and books from antique stores and libraries. I found many tailor's thimbles at antique stores (but no worsted wool), and I found the basic tailoring techniques book from my local library (who had to transfer it from a different library).

I hope this helps.

- Killdeer

#67 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 31 July 2012 - 03:47 PM

In my most humble of opinions on books I give the following:

For those wishing a good solid foundation in classic English tailoring, nothing beats the whife/Dellafera "Art of Garment Making" with Liberty's 1950's edition of "Practical Tailoring". This is more than enough, in addition to this forum, to have a good grounding in this style.

For those that want to learn American methods or Ivy style Look no further than Stanley's books

If you are one who would like to expand your knowledge of single needle (machine) American tailoring Poulin is a great resource.

Others may disagree, but I believe if you stick with one method of making up as you learn you can practice and master these techniques to where they become second nature. Once this is done then you may reach out. Too many times beginners overload themselves and we see from time to time someone saying "Whife does this, Poulin does that and cabrera does it all backwards, which is the right way" Simple answer? All of them!

Cabrera's work was meant for a basic tailoring course at FIT. Stanley's books were for a trade school. Whife/Dellafrea was for the T&C Academy and I believe Practical Tailoring by Liberty was designed for use at the Polytechnic in London. So you see all were used as teaching aids in addition to hands on lessons provided by the faculty at these schools. Sometimes being taught by the authors themselves. So now what me must realise is that we do not have this luxury to pop down to the respected school to inquire upon the arthors. So find a method of workmanship you wish to pursue, then if you get caught in a position you do not quite understand then take a look at the alternative books I mention in that vein of methodology. For example Dellfrea could not describe how to make side pockets in a convincing way, whife does a better job, but does lack some detail that could leave the student wondering if the pocket really is properly done though it is in. So Liberty to the rescue! Liberty describes how to put in side pockets in much more detail. In fact, the photos in Whifes AGM are from a series of pocket making that Liberty wrote in the T&C. Same method, three different authors take and only one could articulately present it to a student via the written word.

All of these works are a steal in pricing. In my opinion Mr. Hosteks works stand out in how detailed they are and the in text alternatives make life a little simpler for those wishing to go step by step with open book.
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#68 napoli

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 04:07 AM

Do you recommend me those books? I want to learn coatmaking. No women or waistcoats. thanks

#69 tailleuse

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 01:06 PM

Do you recommend me those books? I want to learn coatmaking. No women or waistcoats. thanks


You need to learn how to make a vest (waistcoat) before you make a coat. There's usually a standard progression: Skirt (if doing women's tailoring), trousers, vest, coat. The garments range from the least to the most structured.

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#70 napoli

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 01:10 PM

oh i hate waistcoats. How many pages have the panphlets? If any wants to sell them at good price i will buy them. I want to learn . Thank you

#71 greger

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 09:43 AM

Some tailors teach the waistcoat last.

Tailoring has been by far mostly a men's world. But, there are some sharp women, too.

So, as said before, another book is by Jane Rhinehart - How to Make Men's Clothes

#72 Miekka

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 08:39 PM

Hello all,

First of all I would like to thank everyone who participates on this forum; it's a magnificent resource and I am so glad to have found it.
I have just begun my long journey towards becoming a tailor. I've been following this thread to the letter: I bought a tailor's thimble, some prym betweens, and beeswax at a local "merceria" here in Rome. I've picked up a few scraps of herringbone cashmere from a local tailor (just walked in and asked if he had any scraps he was going to throw away) and have been practicing my basting stitch.

At this point I have two questions that I hope are not too preemptive. As Sator has pointed out throughout the forum, learning the trade online is like learning to becoming a surgeon online, and it is essential to search for placement as an apprentice. But surely tailors are looking for apprentices who will actually be of help, so my first question is: At what point would it be appropriate to start looking for a tailor willing to take on an apprentice?

I have also been considering taking a tailoring course, but several people that I have talked to have suggested that I start directly by following a tailor because courses are very basic. Since I am most interested in Neapolitan tailoring I was hoping to find some course in Naples but when I search the internet I can't find anything that seems decent. Maybe someone on this forum knows of a really good course in Naples??

Any comments / suggestions would be wildly appreciated.




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