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Learning to Tailor by Self Tuition- (Beginners Please Read)


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#73 amateursarto

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 12:52 AM

Jason,
Would you say that Stanley Hostek's methods could be used in conjunction with a draft from say, Rundschau or Tailor and Cutter? I ask because I appreciate the detail in Mr. Hostek's books, and that's the method I want to learn, but I wonder which draft to use in conjunction with it. I have drafted a Rundschau, a Tailor and Cutter and one from The Master Designer (Chicago, Illinois, circa 1950) and I am trying to determine which one to use with Mr. Hostek's construction guides. I want a somewhat fitted coat and trousers with the coat being cut in a way to accomodate for strong chest and stomach, ( moderately prominent, not corpulent). Any help is appreciated.
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#74 Schneidergott

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 04:12 PM

Miekka,

why don't you talk to the tailor who gave you the cloth scraps?

1) I don't think that the tailoring methods (the actual sewing part like pockets, collars and such) is different in Milano, Roma or Napoli.
2) Even if he's not interested he might be able to give you some names, either of Neapolitan tailors in Rome or of someone in Napoli.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

 


#75 Miekka

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 07:09 PM

Thanks for the reply Schneidergott... I will have a chat with the tailor who gave me the scraps, but honestly having seen his work, which is quite limited (to put it simply), and having talked with him a couple of times, I doubt he'll be of much help.
I think that you are probably correct that there is little difference in the methods in different areas in Italy, but I would like to get straight to the source of neapolitan tailoring if I can. I've found some courses here in Rome which will be my alternative.
Do you think it would appropriate to start looking for apprenticeship once I have grasped the hand-stitches? Or should I be at a more advanced point before I start presenting myself?

#76 Michael~

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 02:13 AM

This thread is a great resource. There's so much information on this forum that without a guide like this to get you started it can be hard for a beginner like me to know where to begin.

I'm brand new to tailoring and so far I have my thimble and betweens and I'm waiting on my cloth arriving. I did have a chat with Rian from Huddersfield Cloth but his best price wasn't great for practice cloth. I'm lucky that I live in Yorkshire so I have plenty of sources to choose from. I'd love to find a master and I'm planning on looking for one once I have more skill in my stitching.

I guess I'll have a look around for the recommended books at sensible prices too.

It's nice to see you all!

#77 Schneidergott

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 03:50 AM

Thanks for the reply Schneidergott... I will have a chat with the tailor who gave me the scraps, but honestly having seen his work, which is quite limited (to put it simply), and having talked with him a couple of times, I doubt he'll be of much help.
I think that you are probably correct that there is little difference in the methods in different areas in Italy, but I would like to get straight to the source of neapolitan tailoring if I can. I've found some courses here in Rome which will be my alternative.
Do you think it would appropriate to start looking for apprenticeship once I have grasped the hand-stitches? Or should I be at a more advanced point before I start presenting myself?


Have you tried contacting the

Accademia Nazionale dei Sarti?
They offer courses in Rome and might at least give you names of tailors who are trained in Neapolitan tailoring, although living in Rome, or of tailors who might take on an apprentice directly in Napoli.

They should also be able to tell you what you should bring to the table, so to speak.



"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

 


#78 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 04:31 AM

If you can show a master a trouser you made that might be an entry.
www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#79 Miekka

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 06:05 AM

Have you tried contacting the

Accademia Nazionale dei Sarti?
They offer courses in Rome and might at least give you names of tailors who are trained in Neapolitan tailoring, although living in Rome, or of tailors who might take on an apprentice directly in Napoli.

They should also be able to tell you what you should bring to the table, so to speak.


I contacted them a few days ago, but they're asking €5500 a year, which I absolutely cannot afford. I'll continue my search for good schools; hopefully I'll be able to find something decent at a good price. Several people have told me that it isn't absolutely necessary to go to a school... would you agree?


If you can show a master a trouser you made that might be an entry.


Cheers. I'll do that; once I get good enough of course :)

#80 Michael~

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 08:20 PM

I've gone and bought the Hostek books since they seem to be so highly recommended, I'm happy that shipping was only $1 to the UK. I'll be keeping my eye out for the other recommended books but some, Cabrera's for example, is very over priced right now (greedy people trying to make an insane profit).

#81 redpanda

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:27 AM

hi! wonderful thread. edit: i had a question but found the answer, my apologies

Edited by redpanda, 23 April 2013 - 09:32 AM.


#82 tailleuse

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:34 AM

hi! wonderful thread. i have probably a weak question but does a "fore-stitch" go by any other name? because i cannot seem to find this stitch in any of the links to books in the post or by searching through google. i only find the "back-and-fore-stitch". i am thinking maybe it is also called basting?


I would imagine that the "fore-stitch" is the "running stitch." It's a permanent stitch. It's often 1/8 to 1/4" in length. The same stitch done to temporarily hold fabric together, often with bigger stitches, is a "basting stitch."

"Even basting" consists of a line of stitches and spaces that are the same (say, 1/4").

"Uneven basting" features a line of stitches with alternating long and short stitches and spaces that are the same. It is often used to mark fabric because on one side the fabric has line of long-short-long-short stitches and on the other (often the right side) the pattern is short-short space short-short space. I don't know if this makes any sense. If you find an image or try it, it will be clear soon enough.


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#83 marieamorim

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 09:03 AM

Sorry, but I still do not know where put the questions, so I ask this space. Please can someone explain what is:
 
RTW
DB
armscye
 
thank you

 



#84 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 09:21 AM

RTW = ready to wear
DB= double breasted
ARMSCYE= arm hole
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#85 HILARYLOUISA

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 01:14 AM

Hello, i am new to this forum, i work as a stretch fabric pattern maker (womens-industrial) and am interested in understanding mens tailoring.

 

i have a few questions and suggestions:

 

first of all is the trouser pattern draft link in the initial post mens or women? and if it is a women's can someone please recommend a good mens draft?

"Mansie has been kind enough to provide a nice trouser draft in metric <opens a download of the system>.

 

-the womens version of book Classic tailoring techniques by Cabrera, Roberto. is available on open library.org. you can borrow it for 13 days.

 

-something i found useful when learning women's wear was to study badly fitting garments in order to understand and avoid the problems. is there any threads/images for mens pants and/or shirts fitting?

 

thanks in advance! 


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#86 tailleuse

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 01:43 AM

Hello, i am new to this forum, i work as a stretch fabric pattern maker (womens-industrial) and am interested in understanding mens tailoring.

 

i have a few questions and suggestions:

 

first of all is the trouser pattern draft link in the initial post mens or women? and if it is a women's can someone please recommend a good mens draft?

"Mansie has been kind enough to provide a nice trouser draft in metric <opens a download of the system>.

 

-the womens version of book Classic tailoring techniques by Cabrera, Roberto. is available on open library.org. you can borrow it for 13 days.

 

-something i found useful when learning women's wear was to study badly fitting garments in order to understand and avoid the problems. is there any threads/images for mens pants and/or shirts fitting?

 

thanks in advance! 

 

Do you have read the openlibrary.org books on a computer?  Can you send them to a Kindle?  I assume there's no way to print them out?  Borrowing a book would be a good way of previewing a book before buying.

 

There are numerous threads in which people post muslins or garments and ask for help. Keep watching the beginner forum.  Here's one.


Edited by tailleuse, 18 November 2013 - 01:45 AM.

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Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#87 HILARYLOUISA

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 04:14 AM

hi tailleuse, some openlibary books can be downloaded and printed, if the book is protected the only option is to borrow it and read it in adobe digital editions, if you want to print a page then take a screenshot of it (shift+cmd+4 on a mac).


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#88 tailleuse

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 11:07 PM

hi tailleuse, some openlibary books can be downloaded and printed, if the book is protected the only option is to borrow it and read it in adobe digital editions, if you want to print a page then take a screenshot of it (shift+cmd+4 on a mac).

 

Thank you, HILARYLOUISA.  I'd never heard of openlibrary before you posted.  :-)


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#89 DesertElephant

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 12:25 AM

Okay, so, I knew I was going to have troubles learning the trade, but boy, I get it now.  Especially the working your way up to jacket making Caveat.

 

I was curious as to what all went into the making of a quality, bespoke jacket, and so I started looking for videos of this on Youtube.  I found Rory Duffy's videos on making a sport coat.  I think all beginners should watch the entire series so they can see Just How DIFFICULT it really is.  That way they'll know to start small and work their way up.

 

Here is the link to Rory's Youtube page: https://www.youtube....bkCvQCoA/videos

 

The, "The Making of a Coat" video series may help drive you and Sator's point home in a way that simple words might not.


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Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, but not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; for the apparel oft proclaims the man.

-Polonius, Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 3


#90 DesertElephant

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 01:31 AM

I have a very quick question as it relates to the building up of skills as an apprentice here at The Cutter and Tailor.  In the hierarchy of learning stages Skirts/Trousers ->Waistcoats ->Jackets, where do Shirts fit?  I want to ensure that my tuition is in the proper order as set out by the Masters in this Master/Apprentice relationship, as I would like to take my learning very seriously, and in the order and at the speed that is recommended.

 

Thank you in advance for the clarifying response.

-Jesse W. Canfield


Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, but not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; for the apparel oft proclaims the man.

-Polonius, Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 3





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