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What does scale mean in Robert Doyle's the Art of the Tailor

trouser drafting measurements

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#1 foomarks

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Posted 15 December 2018 - 09:24 AM

I'm attempting to draft a pair of trousers according to Robert Doyle's The Art of the Tailor book.

 

In most of the drafting instructions there is a term used called "scale", but it doesn't refer to what it is being scaled against. I've re-read the introduction several times to look for what exactly this means (scale from side length? scale from hip width?), but I'm hoping someone who has encountered this before can point me in the right direction of what this means.

 

Attached is the corresponding diagram, and these are some of the sample instructions given with the term "scale":

 

3 from 1 is 1/4 scale

4 from 3 is 1/4 scale 

7 from 4 is 1/6 the scale

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#2 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 15 December 2018 - 02:57 PM

Scale is a figure, devised by the particular cutter, and which will be specified somewhere on the pattern, that expresses some factor of proportion.

 

You simply do the calculations using that number.  Scale can be different for each garment, each workshop.


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#3 greger

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Posted 15 December 2018 - 04:43 PM

On American and English Trousers Scale is one Half the measure of the SEAT Measure. You are drawing one half the body.

Usually the highest measure is the waistline. The next measure down is the seat.  The seat measure is the circumference of the body (front around back to front). Knee measure and bottom. Once in a while a thigh measure is handy. Vertical measures are outseam and inseam. The book probably explains these measures.

The pattern measurements, when finished, will most likely be two extra inches across the seat. These are for seam allowances and ease. Seam allowance is probably one quarter inch. Amount of ease can be adjusted. I wouldn't change the ease amount until first pair are made.


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#4 SINNED

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Posted 15 December 2018 - 05:43 PM

In the English Tailor and Cutter system scale is half chest or seat on small sizes and third of seat plus 6 inches on normal to bigger sizes. This is usually applied with a Tailors square that is marked for scales. You have to find this authors system and buy yourself a square.
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#5 Henry Hall

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 07:36 AM

If it's one of those ancient systems requiring a 'special square' unique to the system, it's a dead loss.


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#6 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 02:13 PM

That looks like the CPG system (same as MTOC and Tailor and Cutter)

In this case the scale is half seat. For instance if the seat is 40 then scale would be 20
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#7 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 02:16 PM

Though should read 1-3 1/3rd scale, 3-4 1/6th scale and 5-4 1/6th scale (sometimes 1/6th scale plus 1/4)
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#8 foomarks

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 02:32 AM

Perfect, thank you everyone for your help with this! The instructions now make more sense with the scale defined!


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