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Canvas Construction for Women's Coats


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#1 Sator

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 09:48 PM

I know a lot of people have been pining for a ladies' version of the overview of canvas construction.

To kick things off I thought I would start with the following quick overview in ASZ, September 1952.

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Canvas patterns for women require more attention to the particular features of the figure than in men's cutting. Particular attention should be paid to the height and form of the bust. Additional attention must be given to the correct placement of the fullness of chest, which may need to be either a little further forward, or in other cases, a little further back.

1. Left Canvas

The most popular canvas pattern at the time of publication. About 3 cm is taken out of the bust dart, right beside the dart in the coat pattern. 2 cm is taken out of the second bust dart. The last dart is given a particularly pointed tip into order to ensure a smooth transition. For particularly prominent busted figures, an extra dart can be added from behind, coming from the armscye or under the arm depending on the height of the bust.

To prevent an uneven protrusion around the area of the lapel break line, a vertical gorge dart is inserted in order to achieve a smoother distribution of the fullness of bust. The vertical gorge dart is deployed in conjunction with horizontal section. Irrespective of the position of the dart in the coat pattern, the corresponding dart in the canvas should be so placed that it is between the lapel break line and the first bust dart.

2. Centre Canvas

The use of such a canvas pattern permits the waist sections to be cut so that lower half can be given an upwardly directed roundness. When the two sections are sewn together, a shapely length is formed that is particularly suitable for figures with a particularly prominent bust.

Care should be taken to ensure that the seam does not lay too far to the rear. It is better to place it further forward and then to insert another dart coming from the direction of the armscye.

Whether an additional bust dart is necessary at the gorge depends on the figure of the client. The desired fullness of bust can be attained with a 2-2.5 cm dart at the gorge.

3. Right Canvas

If the effect of the darting is to create a high and focused effect, for a figure with a high and pointed bust, this schema can be used. In most cases, two bust darts from below creates a more evenly dispersed bust effect. On this type of figure it can be difficult to achieve a body tracing effect ("Schluss"), and for this reason the addition of another bust dart coming from above is important. The size of this dart should be around 4 cm in most cases. Once again, care should be taken to avoid placing the dart too far to the side.

Original Full Text:

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#2 Sator

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 11:15 PM

In modern women's tailoring, sadly a lot of books seem to take it for granted that fusing be used. Fusing gives a flatter and less three dimensional garment, which is at odds with the fact that women's bodies are in fact more curvaceous with a more complex three dimensionality. For reasons that are unclear, it has also become commonplace to add "mounting" to the side panels and around behind the armscye. Cabrera describes a technique of mounting of a flared cut on skirt. Because it is time consuming the mounting too often takes the form of some form of fusing.

The following text entitled "Tailored Garments" is of interest because it describes more purist tailoring techniques that pre-date fusing. The publication date is given as 1928. Note the way structure is added around the armscye, known as a "wing", but without recourse to fusing. There is mention of quilting, and in the time leading up to the 1920s, quilting around the bust to outline the cup shape, was a common technique for adding shape to a coat. Later quilted linings were made famous by Coco Chanel, whose coats often boasted this feature. However, this rather time consuming and labour intensive shaping of the inner structure without the use of fusing described in this 1928 book remains quite fascinating.

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The use of softer canvas such as linen cut on the bias or partial bias is often recommended in women's tailoring. However, modern canvasses that use wool, linen and hair are considerably lighter and softer than those in 1928 and lend shape without compromising lightness.

The following are the author's instructions on the details of making up and basting in the canvas.

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For a more modern view where the canvas is pad stitched, the reader is referred to the women's edition of Cabrera. For an up to date perspective using fusing the English edition of the Bunka Fashion College tailoring book "Jackets and Vests" 2009, (ISBN978-4-579-11241-8 ) is recommended. This may be purchased through the Kinokuniya website.

#3 inceptor

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 08:33 AM

By advance i present my excuses for my bad english.
I'm a beginner, and I study a woman's coat with handles raglant. Have you some pictures or instructions for cutting the canvas on the shoulders specially on the clavicle ?
thank you for your consultings.

Bonjour,
Pour le cas où certaine personnes seraient francophones voilà ma question : je travaille actuellement sur un manteau femme avec des manches Raglants. Je cherche à savoir comment couper les toiles de corps au niveau des épaules et plus spécialement sur les clavicules?
Merci par avance pour vos réponses.
anfänger ; beginner ; principiante ; débutant


http://philippecairo.wordpress.com

#4 theBlackSheep

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 09:24 AM

thank you for this - it's a welcome and much appreciated addition. women's garments sometimes don't get the same attention here as those for men...

#5 Lasska

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 03:06 PM

Thank you very much for posting this information. :give_rose:

#6 Sator

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 09:49 AM

From the ladies' Zuschnitt XII edition (circa 1950s).

They emphasise the need for the canvas to remain soft and flexible. The choice of canvas is important here. Always pick one that has plenty of spring. Never choose a canvas that is excessively heavy. The cut of the canvas should be based on the cut of the foreparts, but with a stronger emphasis on the final desired bust shape.

It seems a much more pointed bust shape was in fashion at the time:

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Because of this, they recommend making changes to the canvas pattern to conform to changes in underwear fashions. The first cut here was considered out of fashion at this time because it produced a much less pointed bust shape, that flatted at the the peak, like modern bras do:

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The period fashion was for a coat cut with a more pointed bust shape:

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A even stronger fullness of bust can be attained at the same time as the hollow of the shoulder:

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For a double breasted coat a cut from the front is also introduced:

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To create a more concave lapel line the dart can be made to taper out at the front edge of the lapel.

The upper side of the canvas facing the cloth:

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The inner side of the canvas:

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Full text:

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It should be noted that these old texts should always be read with caution. Cloths have changed and so has the weave of canvas - both are much lighter. Light canvas do not take having lots of big cuts being put into them, as it tends to weaken the spring of an already soft canvas. On the other hand, I suspect that there is also sometimes an excessive fear of adding cuts. The other thing to be cautious with is that large cuts can be visible from the outside of the coat, especially with lighter cloths.

Present day fashions again tend to favour the canvas pattern that they said back in the 1950s not to use any more, since pointed bras are no longer in fashion. Notice also the way the darts have been "shaped" - they are not left perfectly triangular. However, to produce a more pointed dart end, they actually do leave the edges of the dart straighter towards the pointed end of the dart or for a stronger effect have the point curve outwards. To let the point soften out as you get closer to the tip, taper the darts as per the canvas pattern that they say was out of date back then.




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