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#1 Kenn

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 03:13 AM

What weight interfacing is comparable to wigan or horse hair canvas.

#2 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 05:51 AM

Wigan is used to interface hems and the back of mens' vest. I've never seen it used for a front or forepart. 

 

I'm not sure what you mean by horse hair canvas. Horse hair is very stiff and used for hair cloth. Goat's hair is the hair used most often in hair canvas. 

Hair canvas comes in 3 wts. light, med., and heavy. 

Compared to hair canvas, wigan med. light. Compared to organza it is medium heavy. 


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#3 Kenn

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 09:35 AM

Thank you.
In Poulins Tailoring the Professional Way he uses wigan in the forepart but Cabrera uses fusable for his vest foreparts.
So I wasn't sure what weight the wigan is or what weight disable Cabrera used.
But mid weight sounds about right I would think.
Thank you

#4 Kenn

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 09:36 AM

Disable is suppose to be fusable.

#5 pfaff260

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 03:50 PM

I was taught to use the light version haircloth. But you could use collar linnen. I think this looks much the same as holland/linnen. http://www.thelining...-linen-holland/ This linnen is what you find often in vintage waistcoats. I don't like wigan as an interlining. We call it interflex. We use it for the hems as Claire Shaeffer explaines here http://www.cutterand...?showtopic=1267 But at school the did use wigan for summer ladies jackets.



#6 Dunc

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 07:02 PM

Bernstein & Banleys also sell a linen canvas specifically as "waistcoat canvas": http://www.thelining...istcoat-canvas/. I've used it and it seems to give good results, but I've only made one waistcoat, so I can't compare it to anything else.



#7 tombennett

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 04:34 AM

Light weight body canvas will do.


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#8 Kenn

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 09:17 AM

So a lightweight disable would work.?

#9 Kenn

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 09:17 AM

Fusable

#10 greger

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Posted 21 April 2018 - 06:38 AM

Light weight body canvas will do.

 

Vest are a bit different than coats. 

Vest are more between a shirt and coat. 

I would stick to waistcoat linen or Holland linen. 

English canvas that has horse hair in it is to springy for vest. And, probably to heavy. 

French linen (collar linen) is incorrect to. 



#11 greger

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Posted 21 April 2018 - 06:43 AM

Stay away from fusable. 

The purpose of canvas is it adds flexibility.

Glued does not give that extra desirable future. 






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