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Trouser Making Book & DVD Coming From David Page Coffin


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#37 jcsprowls

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 12:13 PM

You prove a draft by sewing it and fitting it.

A sloper is any pattern (i.e. first/draft, proven) without seam allowances. A block is any proven pattern with seam allowances. Master patterns are base size blocks, without details and made specifically for the fabrication.

In terms of pants, I would need a separate master for each of the following fabrications:
- tailored trouser
- chino
- jean (or, 5-pocket)

The same terminology is used in the die & mould industry. A master is for all intents and purposes, the DNA of the product. Masters are used to make the block moulds which are then used in production.

BTW: Copying, Rubbing off and knocking off are different shades of "to copy" - the difference between them is intention. These terms aren't interchangeable.
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#38 dpcoffin

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 03:41 AM

Fascinating and useful; thanks!

btw, what's the difference, then, between copying and rubbing off? (I'm assuming "knocking off" implies going into production with a copied thing, no?)


#39 amateursarto

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 05:39 PM

What are your thoughts on Jane Rhinehart's trouser draft in her book "How to Make Mens Clothes"?


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#40 greger

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:07 PM

What are your thoughts on Jane Rhinehart's trouser draft in her book "How to Make Mens Clothes"?


I like her pants. The back part is to high but, easy to pinch out the excess just below the waistband to find the proper height. For a fitting you don't want to cut the darts out. Sew it, but don't cut it. When you figure the proper height, then you can cut the dart, and to the proper width. Some guys need two darts. Flat seat would be a trace dart.

Also, for a fitting, just baste the pants together with no pockets. Baste the four panels together, sew the darts, add waist band with canvass and a zipper with a fly. Nothing permanently is sewn. After all the adjustments are made change the paper pattern to fit. Now make the pants.

#41 greger

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:19 PM

dpcoffin, Why didn't you go to a tailor to learn how to make clothes? Not sure when you started making clothes, but if you started in the 70s there might have been one in your area that would have taught you.

Stanley Hostek is a hard task master. He certainly likes his methods. While I have some other preferences I certainly glad he wrote his books. His coat making has lots about fittings. I was surprised his pants book didn't have anything about fitting. His pants construction methods are really nice (haven't tried them yet).

#42 posaune

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 07:58 PM

Please, Greger
could you explain what is " a trace dart"
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#43 greger

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 03:51 AM

Please, Greger
could you explain what is " a trace dart"
Posaune


Usually darts in pants (hip darts (sometimes there is a dart in front)) are 1/2" to 3/4" as general. A trace dart is folding the cloth and sewing close to the fold instead of cutting out 3/4" dart and sewing 1/4" seam allowances. The opposite would be to look at guys who do gymnastics; these guys have lots of muscles all over and some of these guys can use three darts.

#44 Sparkles

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 07:49 AM

I have my copy of David's book and I love it. I read it so many times and played the videos, it now seem as though he is speaking to me personally.

I used his book and tried several of his techniques. I am very pleased with myself.

#45 NW Tailor

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 03:47 AM

dpcoffin, Why didn't you go to a tailor to learn how to make clothes?


I recently had the opportunity to meet David Page Coffin ~ it was one of the most delightful afternoons I've had in years. His story and journey through the (background) world of apparel would be a book that I would love to add to my library. While not having gone the traditional tailoring education route, he is one of those genuine "research and development" minds that plunge into a construction question, get the answers, and move on to the next apparel mystery.

While I went to meet David with my own agenda of questions, that was quickly put aside as he began sharing his vast knowledge of tailoring details. I'm already making a list of subjects for my next trip to pick his brain! :Big Grin:
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#46 Sharp

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 02:51 AM

I have both his trouser making book and his shirtmaking book--both are valuable technique books that I don't hesitate to refer to. I appreciate the fact that he didn't go to specific training, as I currently am not in a position to do so. It makes me feel like he's coming from the same place (although, obviously far more skilled and experienced) and explains it the way someone who hasn't had formal training would. Maybe that's why his explanations seem to make so much sense. I plan on having both my books signed at his Oregon workshop in May.

#47 jukes

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 07:05 AM

Got the book and the DVD although i am in the UK. Very well written and explained and gives a different perspective to the "trade" books.




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