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The Coatdress: Its Aesthetics and Its Current Rareness


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#37 Testudo_Aubreii

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 03:07 AM

This looks more like a conventional dress, since I can't see how you'd get into it other than pulling it over the head. So I guess it's not even a hybrid coat-dress with a coat-fastening bodice, but rather a pseudo coat-dress. Yet I like its looks. Gives the illusion that it's a coat worn over a sheath dress. Same style as Camilla wore when she married Prince Charles.

 

Ribbon-e1363714556455.jpg

 

 


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#38 Testudo_Aubreii

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 03:09 AM

And to conclude, here's Duchess Kate wearing a Walker with zip front fastening. That's it for now. All images (save the below) from http://www.catherinewalker.com/. Congrats to them on finding a way to keep quality women's tailoring alive while acknowledging current fashions.

 

bright-jade-green-outfit-2.jpg


Edited by Testudo_Aubreii, 16 August 2015 - 03:17 AM.

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#39 tailleuse

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Posted 17 August 2015 - 10:25 AM

well - this a wide field! You can do it in almost every fabric you want. In my opion it should have a bit stand - example: wool crep is nice it drapes and fell nice.The ease and making is this of a dress. Feel free and play with your imagination.

lg

posaune

 

In my experience, wool crepe is used in sheath dresses, but not in coat dresses,which require something firmer. The ones I owned were made out of some kind of twill, maybe a mix of wool and cotton.  


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#40 Testudo_Aubreii

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 11:11 AM

What a wonderful thing it would be for women's and men's tailoring if Kate were to commission one coatdress from Edward Sexton and then another from Davide Taub at Savile Row's Maurice Sedwell. Imagine the press coverage--"Kate commissions fabulous new coatdress from the tailor who made for Bianca and Mick Jaggar!" "Kate commissions fabulous new coatdress from Savile Row's most forward thinking house, headed by Trinidadian Andrew Ramroop, and inspired by the world's coolest young tailor." That would indeed be a celebration of Cool, multicultural Britannia, and at the same time a much needed boost for tailoring. It would convey to the world that tailoring need not be stuffy, nor snobbish, nor conservative.

 

Sexton's work for women:

http://www.cutterand...p?showtopic=975

 

Ramroop:

Andrew-Ramroop-Savile-Row.jpg
 

Taub's work: 

http://davidetaub.bl...great-coat.html


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#41 cperry

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 08:35 AM

What a great suggestion. I found it surprising (as just a simple Minnesota girl) that what I found in my quick Google search one day curious about who does the work for the Princess, that it seemed the coverage was more about how she recycles and sometimes buys inexpensive or consignment. Although, there was a mention of bespoke, too. I understand the attempt to connect with common people, but it's also important to support the trade that is a beautiful part of the European heritage. There's also something to buying a level of quality from whom you have some assurance the workers are being treated reasonably well.... (something I'm still working to understand. Maybe something we can all improve world wide.) Just two cents on a sunny afternoon here. It would be lovely to hear that she enjoyed that luxury. I'd enjoy seeing and reading about the tailor's work!

Edited by cperry, 23 August 2015 - 08:44 AM.

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#42 zokiTzar

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 03:09 AM

nice

what would be good materials for this

can it be wool , or is it always some kind of silk?



#43 tailleuse

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 07:09 AM

nice

what would be good materials for this

can it be wool , or is it always some kind of silk?

 

A coatdress is usually made in a medium or heavy wool.  If made in cotton, a twill might be used.  It has body, not as much as that of an overcoat, but it's substantial.


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#44 zokiTzar

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 02:41 PM

ah nice I was worried it migh be some silk :(

 

how is the construction is there any literature for this?

 

I have some nice thin wool deep rusty red

I was planing to do a panel dress from it and it would go with coat dress together

will keep it on my mind if i get some time



#45 cthomas

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 04:11 AM

What a wonderful thing it would be for women's and men's tailoring if Kate were to commission one coatdress from Edward Sexton and then another from Davide Taub at Savile Row's Maurice Sedwell. Imagine the press coverage--"Kate commissions fabulous new coatdress from the tailor who made for Bianca and Mick Jaggar!" "Kate commissions fabulous new coatdress from Savile Row's most forward thinking house, headed by Trinidadian Andrew Ramroop, and inspired by the world's coolest young tailor." That would indeed be a celebration of Cool, multicultural Britannia, and at the same time a much needed boost for tailoring. It would convey to the world that tailoring need not be stuffy, nor snobbish, nor conservative.

 

Sexton's work for women:

http://www.cutterand...p?showtopic=975

 

Ramroop:

 

Taub's work: 

http://davidetaub.bl...great-coat.html

 

 

While a great idea and not even that hard to accomplish because of existing connections between some tailors and the royal family, I think it is unlikely to happen. If anything stands in the way it is probably tradition.

 

I could imagine that the Savile Row tailors are too linked to making suits for the male side of the royal family (and men in general). While maybe not inappropriate, I can imagine there are many set or unspoken rules that come with being British royalty and dressing. That is maybe why especially in the beginning it was always a hot topic when Kate wore something from a high-street brand or otherwise less expensive brands when making an official appearance, that was already quite unusual for someone of the Royal family. 

 

Maybe Alexander McQueen is about as close to tailoring as one can get as a princess.



#46 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 03:31 AM

Has anyone else noticed the trend in Spring '16 RTW? Clothing is once again tailored (some in unique ways) and the Coatdress is back! And long live the straight hemline!

Can we now have a MASSIVELY HUGE bonfire for all of the polyester/spandex/assymetrical/ empire waisted crap that has dominated womens' wear for the last 15 years!!!
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#47 greger

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 07:36 AM

Back in the 60s and at least some of the 70s girls had to wear skirts or dresses from first to eighth grade. Nowadays, girls are being accused, when wearing skirts and dresses, of perverting the minds of boys. And, there just normal skirt and dress lengths, neither short nor long.

Edited by greger, 11 October 2015 - 07:47 AM.


#48 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 09:55 AM

Gregor- you are so right! There is a school here in the states, IMO run by a severely mentally unstable principal, that just sent a girl home because her T-shirt exposed her collar bone! Apparently, exposure to collar bones encourages boys to want to commit sexual assault. The REALLY sad part is that this was a public school - not some religious enclave.

But...never the less, tailored clothing, sans spandex, is back...and I'm happy!

#49 tailleuse

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 02:39 AM

This looks more like a conventional dress, since I can't see how you'd get into it other than pulling it over the head. So I guess it's not even a hybrid coat-dress with a coat-fastening bodice, but rather a pseudo coat-dress. Yet I like its looks. Gives the illusion that it's a coat worn over a sheath dress. Same style as Camilla wore when she married Prince Charles.

 

Ribbon-e1363714556455.jpg

 

 

 

It seems like the worst of both worlds. A separate coat and dress would be more versatile and more comfortable. The outfit also requires the wearer to stand most of the time lest the coat get wrinkled. Fine for Camilla, not great for the common woman.

 

If a pretty, young woman looks just this side of frumpy in this outfit, what would a mature woman look like?


Edited by tailleuse, 13 October 2015 - 01:29 AM.

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#50 tailleuse

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 02:48 AM

Nowadays, girls are being accused, when wearing skirts and dresses, of perverting the minds of boys. And, there just normal skirt and dress lengths, neither short nor long.

 

Very tight leggings and yoga pants are also the subject of complaint. But I agree with the school administrators, some of the clothes are too revealing and distracting. The codes of dress aren't just to "protect" boys; they're designed to counter the hyper-sexualization and self-objectification of girls. (Many feminists disagree with me, but I believe there are limits to "self-expression" for minor age students in school.  

 

Incidentally, I also support codes that forbid boys from wearing pants halfway down their butts, or wearing pants so tight I can tell their religion. You're in school to learn, not to dress for an audition at a strip club.


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#51 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 05:19 AM

I've never been a fan of the "combi clothing" myself. Everytime I have tried anything on, one must be a contortionist to get in and out. The time or two I succomed to a purchase, the item was so awkward to wear it only saw the light of day once or twice before it was donated.

I have no problem with school dress codes -even uniforms are fine. I"m on my phone so can't post a pic, but the girl was sent home for wearing a standard ladies' t-shirt. The resulting scarf that covered up her "offensive" collarbone, making her outfit (jeans, t-shirt, long sleeved sweater) acceptable, is truly just this side of a full blown hijab. THAT outrageously offends me as a woman.

#52 tailleuse

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 01:24 AM

Here's a true coatdress, with a very simple fastening and cut. Don't see why this couldn't be made RTW. It's basically a close-fitting topcoat in a fabric for gowns.

 

Astrid-Coatdress-detail.jpg

 

It's pretty, but it looks like a coat and is rather stiff.  The American businesswomen and professionals I know who have to dress somewhat formally and have the money to buy nicer clothes usually don't dress like this.  They like comfortable separates made out of luxurious fabrics, or sheath dresses, which can be paired with a jacket or a nice cardigan.

 

Don't forget: Americans in formal environments who make really good money tend to have really long hours: 10- 12-hour days, even all-nighters. Clothing that is layered, can be removed as needed, is breathable, and doesn't wrinkle easily is preferred.


Edited by tailleuse, 13 October 2015 - 01:28 AM.

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#53 greger

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 12:26 PM

The pictures in the paper of the forbidden dresses were just ordinary dresses. When I was in school that is what the lady teachers wore, not to mention the girls. That is what they had to wear. The pants suit hadn't been invented yet, or teachers weren't allowed to wear them yet. Besides, the jeans girls wear nowadays are far more exciting. The women today, making decisions, weren't around to know what decency was in the past, as they have proven, and actually are pushing the opposite of the past. Besides, girls and women wear far less at the beach and public swimming pools. Required clothes for girls gymnastics and guys tights for wrestling all parts of the school programs, not to mention swimming competitions. If theses gals were dressing up like hookers that would be entirely different.

Contortionist. Some of the clothing today certainly look like they fit that description.

#54 Failla

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 12:58 PM

I am planning on making a coat dress Marfy pattern 3508. I always loved coatdresses but never owned one...Attached File  3508_2.jpg   48.51KB   3 downloads






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