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#19 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 09:32 AM

I have at times over the years had occasional difficulty matching thread to a project- sometimes when you least expect it- it happens.

Plus - are the buttonholes on bespoke shirts worked in cotton instead of silk? I ask because I have no idea. I would think cotton buttonholes would handle iron temps better, wouldn't they?
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#20 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 06:16 PM

The silk button holes I have made on oxford cloth shirts have not done as well as the cotton ones.

 

For that purpose I have used Gutermann's basic silk thread, not the best I know.


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#21 peterle

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 07:39 PM

Silk will disappear over time using the usual detergents in laundry. It is not recommended in washable garments.

 

The material in the picture is not a 6stranded mouline floss.

It´s called "Schlinggarn" in german and anchor calls it "Coton a Broder" and is usually used for embroidery (crossstitch) blackwork and whitework, like monograms and Richelieu. It comes in different thicknesses and is not meant to be devided. it´s specific smooth yet firm consistency allows to form very uniform stitches, and nice sharp french knots. that´s why it is perfect for buttonholes in washable garments.

 

You can see it here: http://www.makeitcoa.../coton-a-broder


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#22 Henry Hall

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 08:28 PM

Yes, I used the same thread (could be pearl cotton?) in cream for my pyjamas buttonholes. They've been through the wash regularly over the last year and the buttonholes look more or less the same as day one.

 

I might even have lightly waxed the thread at the time. Can't remember.


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#23 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 08:57 PM

So . . . . silk was used in surgery because it is protein and dissolves, where is the duh button :)

 

Thanks peterle for that memory jogger.


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#24 peterle

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 09:36 PM

Yes that´s why we use a special detergent for wool and silk. the ingredients that dissolve blood and other protein spots will also dissolve the protein fibres of wool and silk.

 

Pearl cotton is just 2ply is less twined and looks a bit like a rope. Coton a broder is 4ply and has a more round cross section what makes it ideal for forming the knots.

 

Sorry, didn´t realise there is no pic of a skein in the link. Looking for one I found this: http://www.needlenth...n-a-broder.html


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#25 tailleuse

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 09:06 AM

Silk will disappear over time using the usual detergents in laundry. It is not recommended in washable garments.

 

The material in the picture is not a 6stranded mouline floss.

It´s called "Schlinggarn" in german and anchor calls it "Coton a Broder" and is usually used for embroidery (crossstitch) blackwork and whitework, like monograms and Richelieu. It comes in different thicknesses and is not meant to be devided. it´s specific smooth yet firm consistency allows to form very uniform stitches, and nice sharp french knots. that´s why it is perfect for buttonholes in washable garments.

 

You can see it here: http://www.makeitcoa.../coton-a-broder

 

Thank you. I remember a similar discussion in a thread (so to speak) on hand made shirt buttonholes, except a version of DMC (not the regular embroidery floss) was discussed.  I wrote DMC to find some stores in the U.S., but it wasn't very helpful.  I haven't seen anything by the Anchor brand in the U.S.


Edited by tailleuse, 05 July 2015 - 09:10 AM.

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#26 francescaroqueta

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 03:04 AM

 

Thank you. I remember a similar discussion in a thread (so to speak) on hand made shirt buttonholes, except a version of DMC (not the regular embroidery floss) was discussed.  I wrote DMC to find some stores in the U.S., but it wasn't very helpful.  I haven't seen anything by the Anchor brand in the U.S.

 

Hi Tailluese, 

 

You can find DMC in a plethora of quantities at Michaels.com. As for in New York, I believe Purl Soho has the DMC embroidery floss amongst several other brands of embroidery flosses (Londonderry and Sajou, etc.). Allthough, I am not sure that the prices are that competitive. However, it is always fun to wander into the Purl Soho shop. It's a nice haberdashery-type of setup with a great online store.  I haven't seen the Anchor brand in NYC or California. Cheers. 


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#27 tailleuse

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 02:40 AM

Hi Tailluese, 
 
You can find DMC in a plethora of quantities at Michaels.com. As for in New York, I believe Purl Soho has the DMC embroidery floss amongst several other brands of embroidery flosses (Londonderry and Sajou, etc.). Allthough, I am not sure that the prices are that competitive. However, it is always fun to wander into the Purl Soho shop. It's a nice haberdashery-type of setup with a great online store.  I haven't seen the Anchor brand in NYC or California. Cheers.

 
Michaels.com only carries the ordinary six-strand embroidery floss by DMC, which I see everywhere.   When I wrote DMC last year about the coton à broder they did not list Michaels as a source or Purl Soho. I know Purl Soho in-store and online very well.

Edited by tailleuse, 07 July 2015 - 02:45 AM.

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#28 tailleuse

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 02:43 AM

Yes that´s why we use a special detergent for wool and silk. the ingredients that dissolve blood and other protein spots will also dissolve the protein fibres of wool and silk.

 
Do you know why I frequently read that Woolite is not recommended?

Edited by tailleuse, 07 July 2015 - 02:45 AM.

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#29 peterle

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 07:40 PM

I try to avoid washing woolens too much. Wool has a self cleaning ability, so "brush and steam" goes a long way. To remove smells I hang(indeed lay) my sweaters outside in the humid night air. When I have to wash it, I dissolve some lanolin in the last rinsing water, to reapply  what´s lost when washing.

I don´t know Woolite, it is not very common in middle europe. Does the "not recommended" concerne woolite in particular or all the special wool products?


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#30 Henry Hall

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Posted 09 July 2015 - 03:57 AM

You can buy woolite in Europe. I've had it in France, Belgium and the Netherlands. It says it's okay for wool (hence the name) and silk even. I've used a small amount on wool to bring out a stain, with no ill effects. However, I go for the brush then 'sponge and press' option much more often. Rotating the garments too.


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Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#31 francescaroqueta

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Posted 09 July 2015 - 11:19 AM

Michaels.com only carries the ordinary six-strand embroidery floss by DMC, which I see everywhere.   When I wrote DMC last year about the coton à broder they did not list Michaels as a source or Purl Soho. I know Purl Soho in-store and online very well.


Hi Tailleuse,

You probably know this, but others checking these posts might not... It seems as if Lacis from Berkeley, CA carries the DMC coton à broder and has a color card for a swatch of some (if not all of) the colors that it carries in each of the weights of threads. It seems as if the color range of all the weights except #25 weight are limited. However, the lLacis website does indicate that the coton à border does last through washing for generations to come. For Anchor coton à border, there is also Willow (from the UK) and, better (it seemed at first glance) yet, Sewandso from the UK. Some of that will be on my wish list! Thanks for the Frittolini blog suggestion--it totally further inspires me to sew button down shirts! All the best--F
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#32 cperry

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 08:48 AM

The next time I do hand made button holes, I'm going for the coton a broder. Thanks Peterle for that info (and all for sources). I did a silk smocked top about a year ago and used silk Madeira thread on the button holes..... Happy with doing the button holes by hand....I enjoyed it. But I do not think the silk thread will last as well as it needs for the purpose....
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#33 tailleuse

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 11:02 AM

Hi Tailleuse,

You probably know this, but others checking these posts might not... It seems as if Lacis from Berkeley, CA carries the DMC coton à broder and has a color card for a swatch of some (if not all of) the colors that it carries in each of the weights of threads. It seems as if the color range of all the weights except #25 weight are limited. However, the lLacis website does indicate that the coton à border does last through washing for generations to come. For Anchor coton à border, there is also Willow (from the UK) and, better (it seemed at first glance) yet, Sewandso from the UK. Some of that will be on my wish list! Thanks for the Frittolini blog suggestion--it totally further inspires me to sew button down shirts! All the best--F

 

I didn't know that, but thank you.  I wrote Anchor again and got a little bit of help.


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#34 tailleuse

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 11:06 AM

I try to avoid washing woolens too much. Wool has a self cleaning ability, so "brush and steam" goes a long way. To remove smells I hang(indeed lay) my sweaters outside in the humid night air. When I have to wash it, I dissolve some lanolin in the last rinsing water, to reapply  what´s lost when washing.

I don´t know Woolite, it is not very common in middle europe. Does the "not recommended" concerne woolite in particular or all the special wool products?

 

The weird thing about Woolite is that, as the name says, it's a product designed specifically for washing wool, but on several occasions people with no motive other than to help have written that it should not be used on wool.  

 

I don't know what I'm doing with my sweaters. I picked up one yesterday and it was full of holes.


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#35 peterle

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 07:26 PM

 

I don't know what I'm doing with my sweaters. I picked up one yesterday and it was full of holes.

 

Get sure, you don´t have moths! Feel alerted when you feel a bit of "sand" when you stroke the boards underneath your sweaters with the hand. (my nightmare)


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#36 tailleuse

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 10:55 PM

 

Get sure, you don´t have moths! Feel alerted when you feel a bit of "sand" when you stroke the boards underneath your sweaters with the hand. (my nightmare)

 

I obviously have moths, but I don't ever see them. Weird.


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