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#19 greger

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 10:53 AM

Correct, a pressing form does not have to be rock solid, the ones i made work fine and i know many tailors who make their own pressing aids, doillies, pads, sleeve boards, bucks.
In fact a tailor would know more about what they like to work with, than someone in a workshop.



Yes, get to see the creativity of tailors instead of the manufactured look.

#20 amateursarto

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 02:31 AM

nice videos! quite similar to what i read in hostek's book on waistcoats and vests. (btw, hostek is either english or american, DZ Posted Image . couldn't let that one go...) seriously, they are really good videos. i hope they will add more in the future, especially ones that focus on coats.
on a related note, they have download links for their drafting page too, but i am not able to get anything to download. i use google chrome, which translates webpages automatically, so it's not the language difference, (which wouldn't matter much anyway since there are icons there to help foreign visitors understand what to do), but if has anyone seen these and if so, are you able to download? (if you join the site, that is...)

http://www.die-gewan.../grundschnitte#
AMATEURSARTO

#21 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 03:16 AM

A pressing buck has to be rock solid. You donít need to understand it as you are not tailors but only apprentices.
www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#22 jukes

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 03:19 AM

A pressing buck has to be rock solid. You don't need to understand it as you are not tailors but only apprentices.


Have you ever worked as a tailor ?? and they dont need to be rock solid or they would be made of stone.

Edited by jukes, 29 November 2011 - 03:26 AM.


#23 Schneidergott

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 04:21 AM

The older ones were not mad e "rock solid", at least not in the BRD! The ones I had or still have are firm but "give" since their filling is either saw dust or cork. The benefit of German bucks is that they are heavy and don't move when working with them.
It's the new ones that are very hard and I don't like them, since the filling (straw?) doesn't allow a smooth shape of the buck.

Still, if you don't know how to use a buck, all discussion about how it's made is moot!

BTW, the tailor in the video is most likely Austrian and he's using Japanese scissors and British cloth. No good can come out of such folly :spiteful:Posted Image!

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#24 greger

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 11:14 AM

What is nice about soft- real soft- is you can shape it to any curve you want. Afterall, human bodies don't come from a mold. They also give a huge latitude for fashions.




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