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Sourcing Tailor's Equipment & Supplies


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#19 Schneidergott

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 01:33 AM

I bought a type of knitwear/ jersey type of fusible lately and it is very light and responds well to iron work. It doesn't add extra stiffness to the fronts, it just makes them (also look) crisp enough to make the job a bit easier (linen and cotton fabrics will still wrinkle... Posted Image)!
I yet have no experience with the loss of breatheability of this one, although in general fused fronts tend to make the wearer feel warmer than a fully canvassed version. If a customer tends to sweat easily, skip fusing.
I'm not sure, but with the fronts already fused and supported, the body and chest canvas could be of a lighter type (subtract the weight of the fusible)!
Some MTM companies offer the semi-traditional version to distinguish themselves from competitors (and justify higher prices), but from what I have seen lately it comes down to marketing again, since it has no positive effect on fit, feel and looks. It's actually a bit stiffer in the chest and the lapel than a fused only coat.
If the pattern and the making quality sucks it doesn't add any value.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#20 Schneidergott

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 01:39 AM

Its the combination of fusing i.e. labour-saving and intensive handwork which is a bit confusing, especially as it seems to be doubling the work in his case.


The fused fronts save time, because otherwise the cloth would handle very tricky. So you don't have to unpick the canvas several times (can happen) to get it nice and clean.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#21 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 05:46 AM

Today it is very possible to fuse 6 - 8oz fabric with 30gr fusible and continue with 150g front canvas and 160g springy haircloth canvas without shoulder support (if you know which hair cloth). There is no difference in breathing or ironwork as the fusible is thin like a spider web. You just need to know which kind of material it is and where to get them and how to do it. You can also do edge fusing if you know how - e.g. like Armani (Rundschau). Beyond 8oz I would not recommend a full fusing but edge fusing. I would also not recommend fusing with any fusible over 30g. Fusing can be rather tricky you can do a lot of things wrong and mess up. Fusing and continuing traditional with front canvas is more work and therefore more tricky and difficult but if you get through without mistakes the results are nicer.
www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#22 greger

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 05:57 PM

Also has anyone heard of a jacket construction that uses both a fusible and stitched-in canvas at the same time? This tailor has mentioned using a fusible to create the clean look for the front of the jacket but also doing all the handwork of swelled edges (aka pick-stitching/saddle-stitching), and hand stitching the body canvas and doing all the pad-stitching on the lapels by hand.


Seen premade canvas fronts for sale for tailors, some were machine padded and others were fused. Don't know of any that fused to the coat cloth. Cut the darts and put in the shoulder spread and baste in like a canvas you made. Some tailors use these here in the US.

#23 ladhrann

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 05:48 AM

I went in to see him today, and to look at the waistcoat he is making for me at present. Its a fancy enough one I suppose, double-breasted with a shawl lapel, its a bit of fun and a corduroy waistcoat is almost never seen today. The smile on this man's face was something else though, as he laid out the cut pieces to show me and showed me how he was going to put it together. In broken English he told me that he loved making waistcoats, jackets and trousers. That this was what he really loved.

All doubt in my mind is gone about the project, anyone that puts that much love into his work cannot fail to make something special.




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