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Questions about the waistcoat back

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#1 Denis

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 07:19 AM

I'm about to start making a new waistcoat soon and would like some advice. In the past I have just done a layer of 5.3 oz linen (IL019 from frabrics-store.com) and a layer of silk, but on those waistcoats the bottom edge of the back sometimes curls up exposing the linen lining. This isn't a major problem as I always wear a coat or jacket with them, it just bothers the perfectionist in me. The simple solution seems to be just adding interfacing in the back, but I would rather avoid wearing that many layers and the I'm having more and more difficulty finding natural hair canvas. Is this a problem anyone else has encountered before, and if so how did you fix it?


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#2 tombennett

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 07:30 PM

Hi Denis, the back of the waistcoat doesn't normally have a interlining but rather lining bagged against the back piece, generally coat lining.


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#3 peterle

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 08:37 PM

Probably your waistcoat back is too tight at the hem so it curles up. By adding a dart (hidden under the back strap) You can avoid that issue.


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#4 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 12:00 AM

When the lining curls up to the outside it is to long. Those are simply working failures. You need to use a buck, when setting the pieces together and iron them, so you can see where the lengths are going to cut them even.


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#5 greger

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 03:03 AM

Then, there maybe slippage of one layer when sewing, which would cause curling.

 

Spiecial linen made for vest interlining, for the front, is better than hair cloth. 


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#6 Denis

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 06:07 PM

Thanks, I will take more care getting the sizes right next time.

 

Then, there maybe slippage of one layer when sewing, which would cause curling.

 

Spiecial linen made for vest interlining, for the front, is better than hair cloth. 

 

Could you describe this linen? What makes it suitable for use as an interlining? I buy most of my linen from fabrics-store.com as they are the only place I have access to that I will be guaranteed a consistent quality and colour selection, if you have bought linen from them in the past do you know if any of their selection would work for interlining on waistcoats?



#7 tombennett

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 06:45 PM

Lightweight body canvas is fine for the front, or there is a wool interlining that is used in waistcoats.



#8 peterle

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 02:58 AM

Probably your waistcoat back is too tight at the hem so it curles up. By adding a dart (hidden under the back strap) You can avoid that issue.

 

 

Of course it´s a hidden wedge not a hidden dart to widen the hemline.



#9 greger

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 03:28 AM

http://www.thelining...inen-selection/

 

32" Linen Waistcoat Canvas

 

Or

 

32" Linen Holland 

 

Other places probably sell Linen Holland too, such as Black and sons in California.

Sometimes need to call by phone and talk to the right person. Not everything is found on websites. 

Professional places have a much better chance of better quality than general sewing places.

 

 fabrics-store.com  This place doesn't seem to have it. Looking at their business I doubt they would. It is probably a great place for what 90% of what women sew. Tailoring is a different market. 


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#10 Denis

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 08:05 AM

Sorry for the repeated questions. B. Black & Sons is one of the places I still know of for hair cloth, but the only linen in the interfacing/canvas section they have are two weights of French collar canvas (http://www.bblackand...nvas-p-310.html or a heavy weight http://www.bblackandsons.com/french-collar-canvas-heavy-weight-p-1727.html). I have tried searching for descriptions of these fabrics and to see if they are possibly different names for the same material but all I get are links to storefronts selling one or the other. 

 

Also, can someone give short explanation of these different materials? Specifically how are French collar canvas or Linen Holland different from hair cloth (other than the obvious answer of "fiber content"), what uses are they more suitable for, and what properties make them more suitable for those applications? I know hair cloth is used for shaping the fronts of suits, is generally made of a wool or cotton warp and a horse or goat hair weft and as such it is stiffer when trying to bend it selvedge to selvedge than it is top to bottom, but that is all.



#11 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 08:55 AM

Collar canvas is heavily sized linen, Holland is processed and polished with a glaze, Hair cloth is cotton warp and horse hair weft, hair canvas (hymo) is various fibre content (higher end is wool or camel, cheap is mostly viscose) and has goat hair spun into the weft yarns. Of these there are balanced and unbalanced
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