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vest pattern drafting

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#1 cperry

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 02:30 AM

I want to share the vest that I have been working on over the past six months with the help of Mansie Wauch from this forum.  Though I've sewn for many years now (oy!), I am new to pattern drafting and somewhat new to tailoring (but dearly want to learn the art).  I drafted a pattern based on a block provided by Mansie, created several toiles, and sent many pictures to Mansie for review and feedback.  I ran into difficulties with adjusting for my husband's prominent shoulder and differences from shoulders to waist.  I made an error in the back width, which resulted in creating a yoke that fitted his back and shoulder slope correctly.  I also struggled through the challenges of making changes without throwing the "balance" of the vest out.  Mansie has been very kind, helpful and encouraging, and I want to publicly say thank you.

 

The button holes are "thread button holes" by hand.  I studied anything I could find on this forum on the art of buttonholes (from Jeffrey, Goodrich Bespoke) along with instructions within Claire Shaeffer's book, "Tailoring Techniques".  Ladhrann pointed me to Callum at Bay Tailor Supply.  Callum was very helpful with matching the silk twist with the green boiled wool.  I also purchased cosmetic grade bees wax and gimp from him.

 

Once the button holes were done, I needed to study pockets.  The style of the vest had slashed pockets trimmed with the knit trim only on the bottom.  Again, I found information from this forum and information from Claire Shaeffer's books very helpful.

 

I have a lot to learn.  I just wanted to say thank you!  I appreciate this forum.

 

 

 

 

Attached Files


Edited by cperry, 05 November 2014 - 02:39 AM.

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#2 greger

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 06:31 AM

Looks nice.
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#3 A TAILOR

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 07:15 AM

Very neat and clean work. How did you add the edge trim?


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#4 Henry Hall

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 07:31 AM

Has the flavour of Bavaria in the colour and style with undarted back and trimmed edge. Looks great.

 

I've had a waistcoat in progress for a few months now and, with all the turmoil of illness and having to move house, I've still not made up the back yet!


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#5 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 07:44 AM

Very good made, I love your vest.


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#6 Martin Stall

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 08:57 AM

Looks pretty good.

 

You don't really need such a wide back, since a vest has no sleeves to pull on the back. But, it looks good. I like it.


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Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

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#7 hutch48

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 11:17 AM

You will have to be careful dressing your other half this well, it might go to his head. Nicely done, very professional in appearance and seems to fit well.


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#8 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 12:35 PM

I see what Martin has written, that it need not be so wide, and I think that too.  Though I suspect that he will wear it as an outer garment?


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#9 Terri

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 11:39 PM

The back width was the only thing that I thought could be modified as well.
Very nicely done.

It would have been nice (and instructive to others) to see your progress, although I understand that pursuing private instruction is less noisy.
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#10 cperry

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 04:46 AM

I do appreciate the comments here.  I really wasn't expecting the compliments.  One thing I appreciate about this forum is that your intention is not to simply pat people on the back, but to encourage progress in learning the art of tailoring.  But I have to admit, I went out for a run this morning having seen the comments here, very encouraged.  Picturing myself like the football player who comes away from the touch down, putting his hands in the air!  (Hutch, I better watch it that it doesn't go to my head!)

 

Seriously, Mansie gave my efforts in the fitting an OK.  I think the finishing received a little higher grade.  My apologies that I didn't post as we went along.  I plan to continue with a new project, and will possibly share the next one.  I might have been intimidated with many comments. :) (even if I would have valued them).

 

The trim is a knitted trim.  I stitched it on with an edging foot to the front, and then hand stitched it to the back.  

 

There were a few things I came near asking for help on; such as the pockets.  I wanted to make them structurally strong.  I stayed them with silk organza on the back.  I read about staying them with linen tape, but that seemed to be overkill.  I had to figure out how to bind the pocket with the trim at the bottom and finish the edges of the knitted trim at the same time.  It worked to stitch below the slash just under 5/8" (the width of the tape) and only 1/4" above the slash, and then cut right up to the stitching line in the corners of the box around the slash line.  The challenge was stitching the side of the pockets.  I wanted the trim to meet the top as much as possible.  They could be more perfect. 

 

One thing regarding the hand button holes.  Mansie shared some old hand written notes that instructed to bring the gimp through from the back of the cloth.  I noticed most of the other instructions secured the gimp to the front, laying on top of the fabric.  I had some difficulty with the gimp wanting to peak out of the silk twist, but was able to cover it well enough.  I'm curious if anyone has installed the gimp by bringing it from the back.  Maybe a different type of gimp was used at that time.

 

I would like to explore the various ways to stitch the button holes, as I've read there are a few ways (stitches) to use.  

 

I see what a few have mentioned about the back width.  Interestingly, the style I was aiming for was made sort of wide.  It seems to hug in at the neckline and the shoulder line.  The extra width will be useful in carrying a cell phone.  My husband was picturing this as a garment worn during activities like cross country skiing or skating.  The pictures I shared were taken as he headed off to work.  He works in an office as a statistician right now.  Sitting at a desk in the winter of Minnesota gets chilly.  He mentioned it was comfortable wearing it inside the office, and it was also great when he went out for a walk.  I think the temp here is getting down to around 45 degrees F, and dipped to 28 the other day.  (7 C and then -2 C)

 

I know that 6 months seems ridiculous for making a vest, but I was glad to not have a deadline, so that I could communicate with Mansie, take it slow and enjoy the learning.


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#11 greger

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 04:59 AM

The back width is correct for the outdoor activities you mentioned and a cold office here in the USA. Europe may have different rules.
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#12 A TAILOR

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 03:37 PM

cperry

 These were not pats on the back. Tailors appreciate Good workmanship when they see it.

 

We brought the gimp up from underneath. The needle we used was a giant one.

The gimp had to be shredded over a knife blade to make it thinner. this for about 3 inches

from the end. This allowed it to be threaded through the eye. Then 00 or 000 silk

machine thread was used to secure the gimp by hand with simple stitches pushed

 straight through in and out.

 

The needle entered through the facing 1/2 from the end of the cut button hole then ran

at an angle to come up at the end where the first button hole stitch starts.

and naturally it does the opposite, going back at the end of the button hole.

And the gimp ends are buried.

 

Alex


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#13 cperry

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 04:05 AM

Has the flavour of Bavaria in the colour and style with undarted back and trimmed edge. Looks great.

 

I've had a waistcoat in progress for a few months now and, with all the turmoil of illness and having to move house, I've still not made up the back yet!

 

Henry, I'm sorry to hear about the illness etc.  I understand the juggles of life.  I hope you'll be able to get yours done and posted!  Interestingly, my husband studied German in college and had the opportunity to travel there.  I suppose there's an influence there.  

 

 

 

cperry

 These were not pats on the back. Tailors appreciate Good workmanship when they see it.

 

We brought the gimp up from underneath. The needle we used was a giant one.

The gimp had to be shredded over a knife blade to make it thinner. this for about 3 inches

from the end. This allowed it to be threaded through the eye. Then 00 or 000 silk

machine thread was used to secure the gimp by hand with simple stitches pushed

 straight through in and out.

 

The needle entered through the facing 1/2 from the end of the cut button hole then ran

at an angle to come up at the end where the first button hole stitch starts.

and naturally it does the opposite, going back at the end of the button hole.

And the gimp ends are buried.

 

Alex

 

Alex,

 

I do appreciate your encouragement!

 

Thank you for the notes on the gimp.  I will give it a try.

 

Connie


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#14 tailleuse

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 09:59 AM

A handsome piece.


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#15 Martin Stall

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 07:41 PM

Isn't it.


Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...

#16 peterle

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 10:08 PM

This kind of garment is worn a lot here in austria. usually they are form knitted (including the pockets)  around three times bigger then wanted and the finished jacket gets boiled. thus it shrinks to the desired size. the process results in a very dense, warm and nearly waterproof garment, some say even bulletproof. it´s called " Walkjanker" meaning boiled-wool-jacket. Sleeveless versions are usually a bit lighter.


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#17 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 12:26 AM

Hi peterle, that must take some work to ensure a good fit after the boiling.


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#18 Henry Hall

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 03:21 AM

Peterle, I thought those garments were made from loden. I didn't know they were felted by boilng.


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