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vest pattern drafting

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#19 peterle

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Posted 09 November 2014 - 12:35 AM

Well, loden is just another name for boiled wool but usually means a flat fabric. it´s also wool but usually woven. Both materials pass a process called "Walken" in german. it means a treatment with hot water and a mechanical densening with heavy hammers or rolls witch causes the fibers to felt. Of course loden is also used to sew this kind of sleeveless jackets.

One of the oldest factories is nearby and was first mentioned in a tax list of the year 1434 (yes, 1434).


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#20 OJD

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Posted 09 November 2014 - 03:35 AM

I thought that original/traditional walkloden was felted under waterfalls in older days? I was told this by a guy/tailor making tracht clothing in Münich.



#21 Henry Hall

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Posted 09 November 2014 - 11:24 AM

Here in the Netherlands, were dense woollen broadcloth was made made 500 years ago, they also used that warm water/drop hammer technique to shrink felt the cloth.

 

The original wool broadcloths, loden and similar felted clots all seem to be the result the same historical technique.


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#22 cperry

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 09:53 AM

For the interest, the wool I used was bought at Ginny's Fine Fabric in Rochester, Minnesota, by my husband when he was sent for black concert-style wool (for a daughter's choir performance).  He had the Austrian style in mind, but he said it was an Italian wool.  It was a Geiger vest that he hoped I'd aim for.  

 

A quick search on the terms mentioned above brings up lots of interesting vests in the Austrian/German style.  

 

He also owns a boiled wool coat, which is very heavy, and very appreciated in our climate.  We're likely to get SNOW tonight.

 

I've enjoyed the comments here... thanks again for all the kind comments!

 

Tailleuse---I followed your advice on making several pocket samples before working on the vest!  It took a lot of time, but was worth it!


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#23 tailleuse

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 10:25 AM

 

 

Tailleuse---I followed your advice on making several pocket samples before working on the vest!  It took a lot of time, but was worth it!

 

Thanks!  I think that Claire Shaeffer gave that advice in the forum a couple of years ago.  It seems like common sense in retrospect, but at the time it was liberating to learn that just about everyone would be safer doing some tests to see how the fabric reacts before attacking the actual garment.  A couture teacher told us to measure several times, to breathe deeply, and to never do welt pockets if we were tired, but she didn't actually tell us not to proceed before completing several successful samples.

 

One of the things I've always liked about this forum is that people understand that repetition is not a sign of being weak or slow, but of high standards and a desire to get better.  :)


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#24 cperry

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 03:23 AM

Yes, I imagine Claire Shaeffer giving that advice, or maybe I've read it in her books.  That is all good advice.  Ladhrann has likened tailoring to fine cooking.  I think that's a good comparison.  You cannot rush it and get good results.  I found I could only do about one hand made button hole in a day (partly due to other demands on my time, but the point remains).  Also, Mansie mentioned the daunting challenge of this kind of work without having a "shop" to "shop talk".  There are many parts to a tailored garment.  Many things to master.  (I have a lot of respect for the masters here.)


Edited by cperry, 13 November 2014 - 03:25 AM.

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