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How the knee width of trouser legs effects the width of the crotch


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#19 gramountoto

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 03:23 AM

Thanks Posaune

 

 

Gramountoto. no allowance at crotch seam in back - but in front and inseams!

 

Of course. This is what I had in mind... This means one has to substract 1.5 cm for a draft without seam allowance or adapt for other s.a. values.


Edited by gramountoto, 16 December 2013 - 03:31 AM.


#20 Schneidergott

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 02:52 AM

Quote

Thanks Posaune


Of course. This is what I had in mind... This means one has to substract 1.5 cm for a draft without seam allowance or adapt for other s.a. values.


I'd say you'd have to add the amount of seam allowance of the front (in the original image) to get the correct result. The distance between the seam lines needs to become longer.

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#21 gramountoto

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 04:23 PM

Sorry, I didn't realise that there was a seam allowance included at front ... although Posaune clearly wrote  :no:
 
In fact I was thinking about the two inseam seam allowances:

 

Spaltdurchmesser3_zps6a930733.jpg


Edited by gramountoto, 17 December 2013 - 04:27 PM.


#22 Philip_AMS

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 07:04 AM

I don't understand what the lighter solid line on the back and the other dotted line on the front are for ( I thought this might be dress in the front but that doesn't explain the lighter solid back line on the back.

#23 Rory Duffy

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 08:54 AM

Thought I'd give my two cents on this thread.

Some years ago when I cut skinny trousers, I cut the leg closed. It has a similar effect as to what has been described in the previously posts.

Its the same pattern alteration as  knock kneed. In the draft you swing the centre crease line over at the hem towards the crotch 3/4" to 1", depending 

on how slim the fit is. 

 

In my usual trouser draft 17" hem 18 1/2" knee, I open the legs. The reason being most men are bow legged. This cut is very comfortable for both walk and sitting and helps eliminate the unsightly creases when sitting. If wearer spent more time standing around I cut them straight on grain like when has straight legs. Experience has taught me its better to cut for the leg shape rather than usage particular when dealing with extremities.

 

Had a client with a 6 finger bow, walked like cowboy! In this instance I slashed above the knee and created a wedge, then minus the wedge from the side seam hem. This will work on most plain cloths not advisable on a check or strip. 

 

Another tip that can be used on straight and bow legs (not Knock Kneed) is to drop the inside leg balance on the undersides. When picked up it creates a wedge of cloth at the buttock and eliminates unsightly creases at the seat. 1/2" usually does it. 


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#24 ok1898

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 12:45 PM

Put it very well



#25 anand007

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 08:53 PM

oh thanks to  Schneidergott

be cause its very use ful thing 



#26 imtiyaztailor

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 10:53 PM

Good topics but i can't understand to........So hey... in the formula for Abb14, what does the 'bis 2' mean? I'm reading the formula as: ((2 X [total-nude-hip-circ])/10) - 1.5cm __?__

Does 'bis 2' mean to subtract 1.5cm a second time? In French, 'bis' means 'again' as in: 1.5cm + 1.5cm = 3cm
If I take a 48" total nude hip, run it through the formula, it's yields a total stride width (converted to imperial) of 9", which seems right for a slim-fitting trouser.
If I subtract the 1.5cm (5/8") a second time, it gives me 8 3/8" which seems too slim compared to specimen patterns I'm looking at for reference.
If I add wearing ease (48" + 3" = 51") to the Gw value and run it through the formula, I get 9" which seems right, again.

#27 greger

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 11:17 AM

I can't imagine a tailor measuring his clients in the nude. Maybe German tailors are different.

I don't think any directions from tailors say to measure in the nude nor underwear. 



#28 zanzare

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 04:09 PM

Good topics but i can't understand to........So hey... in the formula for Abb14, what does the 'bis 2' mean? I'm reading the formula as: ((2 X [total-nude-hip-circ])/10) - 1.5cm __?__
Does 'bis 2' mean to subtract 1.5cm a second time? In French, 'bis' means 'again' as in: 1.5cm + 1.5cm = 3cm
If I take a 48" total nude hip, run it through the formula, it's yields a total stride width (converted to imperial) of 9", which seems right for a slim-fitting trouser.
If I subtract the 1.5cm (5/8") a second time, it gives me 8 3/8" which seems too slim compared to specimen patterns I'm looking at for reference.
If I add wearing ease (48" + 3" = 51") to the Gw value and run it through the formula, I get 9" which seems right, again.


If you read in a German draft "x bis y" it always means that you can choose a number from x to y so in your case 1,5cm or 2cm or any number inbetween, whatever floats your boat for the measurements of the wearer and the Symmetrie of your pattern. Hope I could help

By the way, sometimes it is also written like: x-y what does not mean x minus y, rather from x to y. To make it more confusing or maybe to avoid to be confused in some drafts the real " minus" ( like 10-4=6) is not shown as "-" but as something like this "%" or this " :-" ( but the horizontal slash between the dots), hence 10%4=6 or 10:-4=6
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#29 posaune

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 10:54 PM

This character (Point above Slash Point low) was used (as far as I know) in Book keeping.
In Rundschau it is used to make a difference between the mathematical process (Minus)and the up to X rule.
If it says par.ex. 10/Bust + 1-2 cm -as Zanzare writes above - it means you are free here. For larger sizes take 2.
Or for more ease take 2 or maybe 1.5. Average is 1.
lg
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