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Waisted coat in 1960s new Edwardian suits?


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#1 carpu65

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 07:07 AM

What is a waisted coat?
Well,here a post of our beloved Sator on askandyaboutclothes forum:

http://www.askandyab...ed-Waisted-Coat

The waist seam started to make a regular appearance on dress coats and frock coats from around the early 1820s.
It provided the tailor with a way of making coats that had a cleaner fit through the waist followed by a distinctive flair of the skirt in a way that can never be quite equaled by darts (or a ‘fish’ as they were once called) alone.
there was a transitional period in the late 19th to early 20th centuries when there arose a type of waisted coat half way between the lounge coat and the long skirted waisted coat: the short skirted waisted coat.
It is a coat close enough to the lounge coat in style to be informal yet allows the skill of the bespoke tailor to impart to it an old-world sleekness.
Would it be outrageous to suggest that the bespoke tailor today expends much of his time on a type of coat least suited to showing off his potential? For the lounge coat is the coat of the age of mass production par excellence.
Rather perhaps the tailor's truest worth is demonstrated in his ability to cut a waisted coat.
If today the demand for a dress coats, frock coats and morning coats seems to be minimal - perhaps there is room for the reintroduction of the waist seam to the lounge coat?While I would hesitate to head off to work in a morning coat, many of these examples of short skirted waisted coats are close enough in style to the modern lounge coat to be quite wearable in this day and age. The style would permit a bespoke tailor to use the waist seam to rediscover the sleek old world bespoke fit through the waist that this technique permits, thus eliminating the last vestiges of RTW potato sack slopiness inherent to the 'sack coat'.



Well,seems that in 60s a British tailor loyal to NewEdwardian silhouette used the waist seam: Bailey & Weatherill.
Here a evidence of this surprising fact :

I graduated from college in 1963 and, before starting grad school I treated myself – I had earned some money while in college – to a cheap flight to London.
Sartorially speaking I was an Ivy style dresser, i.e., tweed sack coats, button downs, and penny loafers.
I spotted a lovely little tailor's shop. Bailey & Weatherill it said in gold on the window. Without thinking I turned the door knob and walked in. I was crisply approached by a decidedly spiffy gentleman dressed to within an inch of his life in a beautifully cut chalk-striped dark grey worsted three-piece suit, dazzling white collar and cuffs, and discreet polka dot silk tie. I noticed that the coat and trousers were cut in an Edwardian way, with a waist seam separating the torso from the skirt ,and the trousers narrow and slanted down at the heel.
He was Mr. Weatherill he said, and was delighted to help me. I had bought made-to-measure suits at home, but this was an entirely new experience. This was THE REAL THING. I blurted out that I had an affinity for grey flannel. “Of course, Sir,” he said, “perfectly appropriate. But I did want to mention, Sir, that we really don't cut an American suit, and our style may not be what you want.” No, no, I assured him, English styling was exactly what I wanted. “Well then, Sir, let me show you some cloths.”


The link:
http://mannerofman.b...can-on-row.html

Edited by carpu65, 11 March 2013 - 07:12 AM.


#2 Testudo_Aubreii

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 03:20 AM

What is a waisted coat?
Well,here a post of our beloved Sator on askandyaboutclothes forum:

http://www.askandyab...ed-Waisted-Coat



Well,seems that in 60s a British tailor loyal to NewEdwardian silhouette used the waist seam: Bailey & Weatherill.
Here a evidence of this surprising fact :

The link:
http://mannerofman.b...can-on-row.html


Great find, carpu. There was a poster on the London Lounge a few years back who said he recently saw someone wearing a lounge-length coat with a waist seam. It had a cutaway front, so I'm guessing it was an extra-short cutaway coat, rather like the University coats of the 1870s. This Bailey coat sounds like it had standard lounge-type fronts. An interesting in-between option.

#3 Testudo_Aubreii

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 01:10 PM

By the way, here's Rupert Lycett Green in his waisted New Edwardian coat with a narrow cut-in: although since it's practically a shadbelly, should that be, New Victorian? (I think it was carpu who posted this photo.)

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And here's an 1870s version of the lounge-length cutaway coat. I don't see why someone couldn't wear something like this today, unbuttoned, and be perfectly fashionable.

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