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Inquiry to the history of the colour named English Mustard


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#1 Naive Jr

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 06:11 AM

Is the colour named English Mustard known in the history of men's fashion? I have recently encountered this name as used for a colour of wide wale corduroy trousers, but found no record of its existence at Brisbane Moss or Pantone or here. Information on the colour mustard can be found, for example: http://en.wikipedia....Mustard_(color), but there isn't much on English mustard.

Edited by Naive Jr, 08 April 2013 - 06:36 AM.

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#2 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 10:51 AM

Color: A Natural History of the Palette by Victoria Finlay has a chapter on yellow and mentions English Red in another chapter, but I didn't find anything on English Mustard.

Claire Shaeffer

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#3 carpu65

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 05:53 AM

Just imagine:
A gray flannel with English mustard windowpane.. :frantics:
Or a English mustard silk knitted tie on a light blue shirt,on a gray glen urquhart suit (glen urquhart with a very tiny English mustard overlaid check)! :p

#4 Schneidergott

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 06:10 AM

http://pinterest.com...nglish-mustard/


Posted Image

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#5 Naive Jr

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 12:05 AM

http://pinterest.com...nglish-mustard/


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Dear Schneidergott,

Yes, I saw that photograph when I searched for information online. Unfortunately, any reference to various kinds of mustards only complicates the matter. Furthermore, when a divine being as your name indicates resorts to humour I must infer that English mustard plays no significant role in your sartorial dimension of the universe, but a physical body does, or that you question if the colour is in good taste?

I remember that the treasurer of a certain society who was so kind to assist me when I received an unexpected inquiry about income tax told me mustard supports character development to combat stinginess. We met by coincidence in a coffee shop restaurant not far from his office. (Initially I requested a nominal membership due, later after his death I refused to pay in protest against the corrupt and authoritarian nomenclatura which controlled the organisation.) His girlfriend told me later that the ascent of a mountain lift in which he intended to reach the top proved too much for his heart. I share this result with you in hope to find something about the colour, not the condiment from which its name stems:

Thank you for your recent inquiry regarding a color called, English mustard. Crayola is the manufacturer of high quality creative experience products and artist materials, marketed primarily under the Crayola® and Silly Putty® brand names. While we don't have a color named, English mustard, most of our color names are taken from a book called "Color: Universal Language and Dictionary of Names" which was published by the U.S. Bureau of Standards. We use this reference guide because everyone sees and expresses color differently. Using the Universal dictionary as a base, we can refer to a standard color system and color names. Many crayon names are also borrowed from traditional artists' paints.

In addition, we have asked consumers, through various promotions, to help name crayon colors. It is possible the color, English mustard exists outside the US. For additional information, we have asked a representative from our international office to contact you:

Edited by Naive Jr, 10 April 2013 - 01:28 AM.

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#6 Naive Jr

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 12:11 AM

Just imagine:
A gray flannel with English mustard windowpane.. :frantics:
Or a English mustard silk knitted tie on a light blue shirt,on a gray glen urquhart suit (glen urquhart with a very tiny English mustard overlaid check)! :p


I am quite enthused by such colour combinations which I imagine to be very beautiful.

Edited by Naive Jr, 10 April 2013 - 12:11 AM.

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#7 Naive Jr

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 12:16 AM

Color: A Natural History of the Palette by Victoria Finlay has a chapter on yellow and mentions English Red in another chapter, but I didn't find anything on English Mustard.


Thanks very much for taking the trouble to check that and contact me. I remember once in Florida all the colorful buildings and plants in sunshine.
I saw an elderly man walking on the other side of the street this morning when I hurried to catch the train I usually see leaving without me. He was wearing trousers which I believe were close to English mustard, a sort of "dirty" yellow. I hope I see him again.

Edited by Naive Jr, 10 April 2013 - 01:32 AM.

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#8 Naive Jr

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 05:01 AM

"I am afraid all of the information we have about crayola colours is all that is on the [Crayola] website, we do not have any other specific colour information to help you. Sorry for any inconvenience."
- A representativie from our Crayola international office who was asked to help me. There is nothing about English mustard on the website.
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#9 ladhrann

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 06:37 AM

There is nothing about English mustard on the website.





When I hear the term English mustard I think of the finely ground yellow mustard from Colmans: http://www.colmans.co.uk/ It has a distinct off-yellow colour that is unlike the brown colours of Continental wholegrain. However colour terms are often very imprecise.



#10 Naive Jr

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 10:19 PM

Dear ladhrann,

Please forgive my delay in acknowledgment of your kind and thought-provoking post. I contact Crompton's.
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#11 Naive Jr

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 10:24 PM

Correction: Colman's
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#12 NJS

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 07:41 AM

Correction: Colman's

A Freudian slip?!


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#13 Naive Jr

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 08:34 AM

If i understand correctly, the poster who asks about the possibility of a Freundian slip refers to my confusing the name of the mustard manufacture Crompton and Colman.  I am not sure exactly what he means. Nor am I sure exactly what a Freudian slip means and why it is important. If I remember correctly, Sigmund Freud, who smoked and reportedly died of an overdose of pain-killer (morphium) used in connection with his cancer of the tongue for which he underwent thirty surgical operations, needed indications of the Unconscious of his patient, a theoretical construct he stipulated in connected with his biologistic theoryof the human being. So such a so-called Freudian slip is used by such a Freundian analyst in the belief it can help to reveal the unconscious of the patient, thus contributing to a process of becoming conscious of the forces under which he or she suffers.  Since I never heard either name before and I don't know what homophonic words -  "coal man" ? the poster has in mind, I'm at a loss to recognize any significance in this proposed predicate.


Edited by Naive Jr, 02 July 2013 - 08:59 PM.

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#14 Naive Jr

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 08:34 AM

To determine if my misspelling of the manufacturer's name is indication for a case of Freudian slip requires that what Freud meant by this is clear. The criteria must be presented. Then we can discuss the question. At this time I try to understand the third chapter Thinking in Service [Dien+st] of World Apprehension in Steiner's main book, in particular the Descartes cogito sum interpretation passage.
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#15 NJS

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 11:30 PM

If I need psycho-babble from a pro, I'll ask for it.

 

So - the (quite inexplicable 'slip') was just a form of subliminal advertising then.

 

And not for Colman's Mustard!


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#16 Naive Jr

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 01:36 AM



If I need psycho-babble from a pro, I'll ask for it.

 

So - the (quite inexplicable 'slip') was just a form of subliminal advertising then.

 

And not for Colman's Mustard!

1. "If I need psycho-babble from a pro, I'll ask for it."  You are the person who introduced the expression <Freudian slip>, not me. Not only did you introduce it, you asked a question using it.  What exactly your question meant, you did not bother to explain. Nor did you bother to explain what you understand as <Freudian slip>. So as far as <psycho-babble> is concerned, you are the babbler. I strove for a common basis of discussion and asked you to explain what you meant, and told you what I believed to understand. As far as <pro> is concerned -who claims to be <pro>? I don't study Freud or psychoanalyse nor do I claim to be conversant about it. So your style of exchange sounds, frankly, quite presumptuous and rude.

But since you told me you live in Brazil, perhaps you are simply influenced by the present expression of controversy between millions of Brasilian protesting on the streets and the government? I don't know what your problem is, but I am sure you write here and in your book(s) and speak English as a cultivated native speaker far better than I do or could, so your telegram style is, forgive me, inexcusable!

 

2. "So - the (quite inexplicable 'slip') was just a form of subliminal advertising then." I had to check the definition of inexplicable to understand this. inexplicable means something is difficult to explain or cannot be explained. You want to use your expression <slip> as a substitute name for my mistake, which I indirectly implied by use of the word correction.  So for you my correction was correction of an "inexplicable slip". If one wants an explanation, one can ask why. Instead you asked: "Freudian slip?" You like to complicate things. Of course, in a way, you are right. I do not know where I got the name <Colman>. [HERE I BEGIN TO CONFUSE COLMAN WITH CROMPTON¨] I just looked here in Internet for <Colman> and discovered it is a brand of mustard! I do not concern myself with kinds of mustard, although I am aware that there is Dijon and some have extra ingredients in them, but I forget just what. It seems Colman's is a English or UK food manufacturer which produces mustard. Frankly, I never noticed that before now. Your further statement about subliminal advertising cannot be connected to any advertising I experience, because my intercourse with advertising would not involve an opportunity for Colman. I don't watch or hear or read any media where Colman advertises. in fact, I doubt very much that Colman is available in any store or shop in my vicinity, nor I have never bought or eaten it.

3. It must be evident to you from what I answered that I didn't get the point - that there really exists a Colman's mustard, because I mentioned the homonymic or homophonic possibility: coal man. I had no idea what you meant because I did not know that such a brand of mustard exists. Perhaps it was mentioned before in a post. I don't have my own internet access, and when I do have access, I am usually under time pressure.      

PS: The owner of the laptop I'm using just came in and wanted to know what I'm doing - to explain it I had to quickly show the person this thread, and having just written about the whereabouts of Colman got shocked to see that everything I wrote above to NJS is vice-versa confused [SEE CAPITALISATION ABOVE] - the poster mentioned Colman, and I mistakenly said Crompton. Furthermore, a quick look at the internet showed me there is also a Crompton's mustard. Everything I wrote above about Colman is valid for Crompton, too. I have no idea how I made this mistake. I never heard of either brand before and mustard never concerned me so much that I spent any time looking for special brands, neither Colman nor Crompton are sold in Central Europe, are they? I am interested in colour, and if you need advertising: Ingo Nussbaumer: Zur Farbenlehre (Splitter Verlag, Wien).


Edited by Naive Jr, 03 July 2013 - 01:59 AM.

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#17 NJS

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 02:19 AM

A sense of humour should be maintained at all times! However, for what it's worth, Colman's English mustard denotes the colour 'mustard' to me. I am not sure that I have ever heard the colour called specifically 'English mustard' though.


Edited by NJS, 03 July 2013 - 03:52 AM.

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#18 Naive Jr

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 04:18 AM

Dear NJS, I have not lost my sense of humour in regard to you because I admire your cultivation and both the selection of that beautiful bird as well as your scholarship. I am not at all excited in a negative way about our exchange - on the contrary, I'm quite grateful you took the trouble to write me, and I have learned quite a bit in this episode about mustard and how easily I get things confused. I shall view Colman's mustard online again, and appreciate as well your reflection that New & Lingwood's name for one colour in jumbo cord trousers (sold out) is indeed new for you. Please do be careful on the street and beaches of Rio - in revolutionary times innocent victims get hurt.


Edited by Naive Jr, 03 July 2013 - 04:25 AM.

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