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What is the best way to shorten cotton stretch trousers?


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#1 Naive Jr

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 08:34 PM

Although I searched under various possible titles for a thread on this topic, I found nothing. There is a DVD in the Russian language of about 41 seconds which is too cryptic and abbreviated to answer my question. The cotton with 1 or 2 % stretch material made in Italy is very thin and my trousers purchased in UK by Internet uncuffed. I intended to visit a special shop where I have already bought bands, but on this occasion will specify that their width be narrower than those sold me vy the new salesgirl who has taken over and seems not to have any experience in shortening trousers - otherwise the broad width is a riddle. Controversy has arose in regard to technique of adhering the band to the trousers - the English lady at the shop of origin advised me to use Wonderweb, some sort of glue which melts, but the Swiss haute couture fashion designer never heard of this and advised me to get the bands sewn. Another controversy is if the thread connecting the inside folded cloth to the outside truser leg should be done by hand or maschine? Is there reason for me to change my plan from uncuffed casual trousers,which I chose for sake of simplicity? 


Edited by Naive Jr, 29 June 2013 - 08:36 PM.

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#2 Naive Jr

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 08:47 AM

Since my spelling correction elsewhere got the attention of an author of fashion history here - presumably he doesn't use <slip> as a term of whatever article of clothing (in German, the word <slip> means [under] pants of either sex), I apologise for those orthographic omissions and other oddities inflicted on the victim.
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#3 Naive Jr

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 08:55 AM

Since my spelling correction elsewhere got the attention of an author of fashion history here - presumably he doesn't use <slip> in his contribution to my English mustard colour inquiry as a term of whatever article of clothing (in German, the word <slip> means [under] pants of either sex), I apologise for those careless orthographic omissions and other oddities inflicted on the victim in the name of Sony-Ericsson, whose mobile phone needs, like Fox Bros. flannel, <loving care> (no sweat).
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#4 Naive Jr

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 12:23 AM

I brought my Cotton Stretch trousers made in italy to an Italian-born tailor who recognised various Features of the Problem and I recognised this Person as the one I was looking for to shorten my trouser legs. He did an excellent Job, but complained that ironing both took a very Long time. Since he before doing the Job also requested a fee to iron the trousers, i did not feel guilty of expoitation.  


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#5 Henry Hall

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 04:34 AM

I've read this thread several times now and I'm still a bit puzzled. It's probably a language barrier thing and that's not your fault. 

 

As to the question, surely shortening trousers of any kind is a basic sort thing; especially for anyone who has taken the trouble to be a member here? No need to go about to shops getting people to do it.


Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#6 jeffrey2117

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 07:06 AM

Hello Henry Hall,

 

    Not all members of the forum are Tailors themselves.

 

Kind regards

 

Jeffrey2117


"An intelligent man knows he is ignorant, a ignorant man knows he is intelligent".

#7 Henry Hall

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 08:42 AM

Yes, kinds regards Jeffrey2117.


Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#8 Learner

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 05:01 PM

Do you ever look at the "Styleforum" website?  There, they'll ask for recommendations for where to take a shirt to have a button sewn back on.



#9 ssarryo

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 08:32 PM

Hi.  My personal experience is that any type of pants can be shortened.  Shortening pants with cuffs may be a little more involved though.

 

First off, are the pants a solid color or have a wide pin stripe?  Are the cuffs a separate piece that is attached to the hem of the pants or are the cuffs part of the pants?

 

Solution 1:  If the cuffs are part of the pants, here's a link that shows how to hem the trousers: http://www.learning-.../pants-hem.html

 

Solution 2: If the cuffs are separately attached, then you would have to separate the cuffs from the pants and shorten the pants to your inseam length plus the seam allowance, which may be about 1cm to 1.25cm.  Then, you will have to attach the cuff to the pants from the inside of the pants, and then turn the cuffs over to the outside of the pants to cover the seam allowances. After you turn the cuffs over to the outside, then carefully iron the cuffs using a press cloth to not leave any burn marks on your trousers, and stitch down the cuffs on the inseam and out-seam to hold the cuffs in place.

 

You may or may not have to narrow the width of the bottom of the pants in order for you to attach the cuffs again. The reason for this is since pants usually taper down to the ankle, the narrowest point of the pant leg is at the hem of the pants.  The higher up the pant leg, the wider the circumference of the pant leg will be.

 

I hope my instructions make sense.  Feel free to reply if you need instructions on how to narrow the bottom of the pant legs to attach the cuffs.  Good luck on your trousers!






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