Jump to content


Photo

Guayabera Cubana


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 gatto

gatto

    Umsie

  • Professional
  • Pip
  • 54 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Milano - Italy

Posted 19 July 2018 - 03:32 AM

I have a customer that  gave me a  Guayabera shirt to copy.

 

I do not know where he bought it. Probably not the original one.

 

The one he gave me has a thing that it is driving me crazy !

 

The Yoke: the part that goes inside of the shirt is a classic one, smaller but classic shape.

The one that goes outside is completaly different.  In one piece is covering the back more then the under and the same is doing to the front:   is covering a bigger part of the front then the yoke underneath.

 

The result is that I have to sew  first the back, the under yoke and the front toghether and then, in a second time, cut separately the second piece of the yoke (the outside) , press it with the desired shape, then baste it, then finally sew it with the risk of making bad result.

 

is there anybody that could me explain why all these complications ?? Just  because it looks different or is there any tecnical reason ?

 

I haven't afford it yet all the rest of the troubles:  alforzas (plissets), pockets,  the bottom is different, etc etc,

 

 

Any draft to suggest me ?

 

Thanks in advance

 

gatto

 

How can I post pictures ?

Is there a place where I could load it ?

 

Thanks 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • Schneiderfrei likes this

#2 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,165 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 19 July 2018 - 04:14 AM

There is a bit of curvature in that part of the back. Easing the outside onto the inside would help create that. With a sewing machine the outside goes down first. Old school by hand is just a matter of pushing the one layer slightly ahead. Usually the top piece. So the outside part goes on top. This will probably be easier to press on a ham. I personally like shaped shirts. 

There are different ways of hand sewing. The british way is rather easy. The way I was taught is to put the clothes on the knee. Put the wrist on top pushing down to prevent slippage. The other hand grabs the two or more clothes and pulls slightly taut adjusting the ease. The needle and thimble is on the hand where the wrist is pushing down. It is not easy to learn. But it has some advantages for sewing somethings. Some tailors are very fast sewing this way.


  • Schneiderfrei likes this

#3 dpcoffin

dpcoffin

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 308 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brookings, Oregon, USA

Posted 19 July 2018 - 01:31 PM

I have one that's just like that at the yokes, but if you scan through the garment images here (there's some good ones of the construction, too):

http://www.historymi...bera/index.html

 

…you can see that the outer yoke shapes can be all different, even if probably all shaped on both front and back edges. So, tradition, no doubt, but also, it's by far the easiest way to deal with outer shaped-edge yokes, like on US Western shirts, to NOT shape the inner yoke and just appliqué the outer one's edges in place over the inner, so that's as technical an explanation as I need to understand the "complication"; it's actually a simplification:) Plus, that's done completely flat (the shoulders aren't shaped, at least on non-custom ones), before the sides seams are closed, so not such a big deal, nor very tricky, IMO.

 

Here's some shots of mine:

BeNMnpK.jpg


Edited by dpcoffin, 19 July 2018 - 01:36 PM.

  • Schneiderfrei and Dunc like this

#4 dpcoffin

dpcoffin

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 308 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brookings, Oregon, USA

Posted 19 July 2018 - 01:34 PM

…and to post images, I go here:

 

https://imgur.com

 

Create an account, then drag in images you want to post. Generate image links, then choose Direct Link, like so, pasting the result into the field that appears when you click on the image icon in the posting toolbar:

fJtMwJJ.jpg


  • Schneiderfrei likes this

#5 posaune

posaune

    Pro

  • Super Pro
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,041 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Germany

Posted 20 July 2018 - 01:23 AM

Thank you, David. This is very interesting. I did not know this.

lg

posaune


  • dpcoffin likes this

#6 gatto

gatto

    Umsie

  • Professional
  • Pip
  • 54 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Milano - Italy

Posted 20 July 2018 - 05:11 PM

Thank you Greger and dpcoffin  for all the suggestion and advices !!

 

Gatto



#7 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,165 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 23 July 2018 - 07:17 AM

Haven't seen the shirts you are expected to make. So my advice maybe totally wrong.

 

As far as copying an rtw shirt from the customer, who really don't know what a proper shirt fits like, you could make a couple of mulims, one a copy, and the other from a proper pattern adapted into the style he likes. If he doesn't know which ones which he will probably pick the one that is proper. Of course, you will need to make all the figurations first to stay in the ball park.






1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users