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Book Review - the Thomas Fisher Cape Breeze Book


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#1 Sator

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 11:52 PM

Mohair blends are something that come in and out of fashion. They were popular through the 1970s, and are currently enjoying something of a minor Renaissance in interest. Mohair comes from goats, as you will know, and the hairs have fine scales which can make it rather scratchy. As a result it has to be blended with wool. Kid mohair tends to be less scratchy, as well as being softer and less coarse than adult mohair fibres. Most of the 1970s mohair tended to be shiny, but these sorts of weaves tend to be quite uncommon these days. The major advantage of mohair is it that helps the cloth to run cool on scorching hot summer days.

The cloths in the Thomas Fisher Cape Breeze books consist of a blend of 70% super 100s wool and 30% summer kid mohair. All of the cloths weigh in at 240g or 8 Oz weight. The use of super 100s wool further helps to make the cloth smoother and more refined. In fact, the scratchiness of mohair has been largely eliminated, while retaining its positive attributes. While this particular combination is not uncommon, the cloths in this book are particularly successful in lending the final cloth a luxurious soft smoothness that utterly belie the fact that they are mohair. In fact, I am considering getting some for myself to use as trousering - something that is usually problematic with scratchy weaves.





As one would expect with mohair, a couple of the designs have a slight tendency to a faint slubiness, not unlike Dupioni silk, without being quite so extreme. That is often part of the character of mohair, but most of the designs do not exhibit this at all. Also characteristic are the many two-tone weaves. The book is also characterised by a higher than average proportion of winning designs.

The stripes have a great deal of character. For example the design in a dark navy with a delightful emerald green pinstripe. If you look carefully there is also a fancy self-stripe there too. Note too how summery the other striped designs are, along with the clear two-tone backgrounds.















The checks in the book are also delicious. Take for example the windowpane checks. These come in brilliant shades of lilac, emerald green and blue. The windowpane is actually much finer than the pictures suggest. Note too, how there is also a fancy self-overcheck in there too on a dark navy background.







The following two Glen Urquahart weaves are probably too close up to show the pattern well, but I am sure you've all seen this design before. What is striking about the ones in this book is the beautiful, but nonetheless understated, lilac and sky blue triple overcheck. This, my pictures show quite nicely:





Finally, there are plenty of highly attractive shades of solid colours to be found here. Some of them are pure solids, others are two-tone weaves. The first of the following is a light tan colour.











You can see one of the pictures, how the sticker of the cloth behind it can be seen through it. That is deliberate, and means that the cloth has been given an open weave to allow a cooling breeze to pass through it. Note too how

The hand of the cloth is remarkably luxurious for a mohair, but retains the crisp dryness of mohair that lends the cloth tensile strength and body. This is one of the most attractive books of mohair that I have had the pleasure of perusing.

The Thomas Fisher range of cloths is available through Dugdale:

http://www.dugdalebr...mas_fisher.html
enquiries@dugdalebros.com

#2 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 12:23 AM

I love the weave of the first two, too bad they are paper thin sad.gif I'd be scared to wear F1919, looks like you could see right through it
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#3 Sator

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 12:39 AM

The weaves and weights are all pretty much the same, the only thing about F1919 is that it is a lighter colour which nicely shows the open weave to good effect by allowing you to see the sticker that was fortuitously placed right behind it. These are summer cloths. You want them to be light and open! Summers here can be unrelentingly hot and long, so cloths like this can be a godsend. They don't look as clean or make up as well as 18 Oz worsted but it matters little when it makes the heat bearable.

#4 jefferyd

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 01:32 AM

These are summer cloths. You want them to be light and open! Summers here can be unrelentingly hot and long, so cloths like this can be a godsend. They don't look as clean or make up as well as 18 Oz worsted but it matters little when it makes the heat bearable.


Who are you and what have you done with Sator?

#5 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 04:35 AM

What he said! shok.gif Confused.gif
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#6 Schneidergott

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 05:53 AM

Who are you and what have you done with Sator?



And I thought only ladies reach a phase in their lives when they get "heat waves"!? :Worried:

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#7 Sator

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 08:43 AM

No. Nothing has changed. I've always believed in a three season wardrobe. I still try to wear 16-24 Oz cloths for as much of the year as possible. I did try wearing a 21 Oz three piece in 28 degree C heat (82F) as an experiment once and found it surprisingly convivial, but these days I am more likely to wear 13 Oz cloths on more moderately warm days. cool.gif

#8 Schneidergott

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 02:32 AM

No. Nothing has changed. I've always believed in a three season wardrobe. I still try to wear 16-24 Oz cloths for as much of the year as possible. I did try wearing a 21 Oz three piece in 28 degree C heat (82F) as an experiment once and found it surprisingly convivial, but these days I am more likely to wear 13 Oz cloths on more moderately warm days. :B)


I have a few older coats with fused fronts made of lighter weight fabrics which wear warmer indoors than my coats made of heavier cloths but with a floating canvas.
Some of our MTM customers choose light and washable fabrics which are coated with a stain protection :shock: :shock: :shock: and they even get a synthetic lining. All together makes an experience similar to wearing a diving suit in the desert. I try hard to convince them to pick an all wool fabric, but I don't always succeed.
We have a few fabrics in our "collection" of similar weight and composition but I don't like them since they don't tailor well. But then, they are in a totally different (read: lower) league of quality.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#9 Hanna

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Posted 22 October 2009 - 09:13 PM

There are some very beautiful designs there. I particuarly like F1909 and F1910.

#10 Sator

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Posted 22 October 2009 - 09:58 PM

We have a few fabrics in our "collection" of similar weight and composition but I don't like them since they don't tailor well. But then, they are in a totally different (read: lower) league of quality.


BTW I suggest you get your company to look into the Dugdale range. The prices are extremely competitive. I showed them to a local tailor yesterday. He was impressed by the quality of the cloths. His eyes popped out of his head when I showed him the quoted prices/m. The big multinational firms are really "fleecing" (in this case goating?) their customers. From a smaller family owned independent firm you get honest quality at honest prices.

Yes, mohairs blend are not as easy to work with as, say fresco/high twist weaves in the same weight. However, this particular range feels very well woven.

BTW to fleece somebody = jmn. schröpfen :)

#11 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 02:01 AM

The prices are extremely competitive.


I concur, the quality for price is unbelievable. Unfortunately 99% of their range I can not use due to weight. If Robert let me do a 16-20 piece fabric collection in heavier weights, I would use them exclusivly, and they would make a killing in the Historical/ Theatre market, but I digress :)

None the less, I can only vouch for the ENGLISH CLASSICS & TOWN CLASSICS (BN 134a), FORMALWEAR (BN 136) and COATINGS (BN 138).

Jason
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#12 Schneidergott

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 05:17 AM

BTW I suggest you get your company to look into the Dugdale range. The prices are extremely competitive. I showed them to a local tailor yesterday. He was impressed by the quality of the cloths. His eyes popped out of his head when I showed him the quoted prices/m. The big multinational firms are really "fleecing" (in this case goating?) their customers. From a smaller family owned independent firm you get honest quality at honest prices.

Yes, mohairs blend are not as easy to work with as, say fresco/high twist weaves in the same weight. However, this particular range feels very well woven.

BTW to fleece somebody = jmn. schröpfen :)


I'm afraid we (my tailor colleagues and me) are not in the position to propose any decent fabrics. It would be so nice to work with decently made cloths and I'm sure it would improve the overall quality and look of our MTM suits and make the necessary alterations (ehem: fit improvements) so much easier. Our flimsy fabrics look quite good when new and well pressed, but quite a lot customers complain about the suits crumpling and creasing after a few hours of wear.
I bought a few fabrics from Buddeberg & Weck which are light years ahead of most of the fabrics we offer and I hardly paid what we pay for ours.
We have a few Silver Gander cloths from R&T in our collection which are among the best and easiest to work with, along with our tweeds.
BTW, are the Silver Gander fabrics still made in Scotland? I find that the quality of the fabrics has changed a bit, and not for the better. Maybe they're now made in India, too?
We had some lightweight R&T Super 120's recently which were not top notch, the finishing must have been inferior, since the fabrics behave strangely when steamed. My no name fabrics never showed such behaviour.
BTW, what do you consider as a competitive price range? Our MTM service is more of an image thing and not highly profitable so the accountants hesitate to spend big money on fabrics. :mad:

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#13 Sator

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Posted 23 October 2009 - 08:12 AM

BTW, what do you consider as a competitive price range? Our MTM service is more of an image thing and not highly profitable so the accountants hesitate to spend big money on fabrics. :mad:


This range runs at £34.10/m plus VAT. It is one of their more expensive options. The New Fine Worsted range is £19.10/m plus VAT.

#14 Schneidergott

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 01:15 AM

This range runs at £34.10/m plus VAT. It is one of their more expensive options. The New Fine Worsted range is £19.10/m plus VAT.


That would be ca. 25,00 Euros, which is very reasonable. Sadly my cupboard is full of cloths and it is hard for me to find the motivation to turn them into coats, trousers and suits.

Is it easy to order the 10 to 12oz range books from them? And how long can one keep them?

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#15 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 01:24 AM

That would be ca. 25,00 Euros, which is very reasonable. Sadly my cupboard is full of cloths and it is hard for me to find the motivation to turn them into coats, trousers and suits.

Is it easy to order the 10 to 12oz range books from them? And how long can one keep them?


If you want motivation you could make me a coat :)
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#16 Sator

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 09:30 AM

Is it easy to order the 10 to 12oz range books from them? And how long can one keep them?


I would suggest contacting Robert at Dugdale.

http://www.dugdalebr.../contact_us.php
enquiries@dugdalebros.com




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