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How to sew a button in a professional way (highest grade) instruction needed.


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#1 Silentiumiva

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 05:35 PM

Dear readers,

Is anyone can help me to find a clear step-by-step instruction/video on how to sew a button in a professional way (highest grade possible)?

Can't find any of on the forum through the search.

Thank you in advance!



#2 Schneidergott

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 07:42 PM

Try an internet search. I'm sure it has been covered somewhere.


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#3 dpcoffin

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 03:54 AM

Here's a video of the Stanley Hostek method,  somewhat adapted (I skipped waxing the thread and use a spacer to control the shank length, but otherwise the same) from the online content for my book Making Trousers.


Edited by dpcoffin, 22 March 2017 - 03:56 AM.

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#4 Silentiumiva

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 04:10 AM

Here's a video of the Stanley Hostek method,  somewhat adapted (I skipped waxing the thread and use a spacer to control the shank length, but otherwise the same) from the online content for my book Making Trousers.

 

Thank you!



#5 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 04:45 AM

My method is more complex, but the stem will stand up.

The braided button stem
While researching haute couture techniques, I visited many workrooms in Paris, London, and Rome to see how fashion designs were created. One of the easiest, most practical techniques, the braided button stem, is frequently used on the super expensive jackets and coats by Yves Saint Laurent and Givenchy. A characteristic of fine workmanship, it is easy to sew, very durable, and attractive.

Every button needs to be attached with a stem so there will be enough space between the button and the garment to allow the button to be fastened securely without creating a strain or puckering at the buttonhole. The length of the stem depends on the thickness of the garment section, but most will be 1/8 inch to one quarter inch long; however, on heavy coats, they can be ½ inch or more and, on shirts, they are usually less than 1/8 inch. You can use either two strands of regular sewing thread or one strand of buttonhole twist.

Rub the thread over a cake of beeswax to strengthen, then press so the wax will penetrate the fibers. Insert the thread into the needle using the needle threader if necessary.

With the garment right side up, begin with a waste knot about ½ inch from the button location. (It’s called a waste knot because it is used to secure the thread temporarily and will be cut off when you finish sewing the button.) Run the needle between the fabric layers and bring it out at the button location. (1)

Make several running stitches to create a small pad at the base of the button this takes a little practice to make the stitches so they catch interfacing but don’t show on the inside of the garment.

Insert the needle into the button, then pick up a short stitch on the garment so the two threads are about 1/8 inch apart and parallel to the buttonhole. Pull the thread until the button stem is the desired length. The finished stem should be as long as the garment section is thick; but since the braiding shortens the stem you’ll need to add 1/16 inch when attaching a sew through button. (2)

Hold the button away from the fabric; then go back and forth between the button and garment several times.

To make the stem, work from the button toward the garment. Divide the threads in half and make a buttonhole stitch around the threads on one side. (3)


Pass the needle under those threads (4)
and out through the center. (5)

Then make a buttonhole stitch around the threads on the other side. Repeat, alternating between the two sides until you reach the base of the stem. Secure the thread in the fabric with several tiny stitches. Cut the thread; hold the waste knots taut and cut them off; the thread ends will slip between the fabric layers.

Sorry, I can't get the diagrams to paste.
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Claire Shaeffer

Author, Couture Sewing Techniques

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www.sewfari.org


#6 dpcoffin

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 07:10 AM

Very interesting, thanks, Claire! (The only way I've ever figured out to reliably to post images here is to put them up somewhere else (eg, Dropbox) and then paste their URL into the menu that appears when you click the image icon in the reply toolbar. Is there some better way, anybody?)

 

Wrapped stems (shanks) will stand up as well, but no doubt, for those longer than ¼-inch, stitching around them is a more consistent and more reliable way to wrap.

 

Do you think that waxing actually strengthens thread? It certainly seems to make threads much less likely to slip once inserted, especially in tightly-packed situations like a button shank. I'd guess it might also seal thread fibers from some things that might weaken them…?



#7 tombennett

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 07:41 AM

Hi Claire, I can't quite picture the 'pad' and its use, could you elaborate a little please?  I was told that waxing protects the silk against wear, weather and ultra-violet light, strong viscose or poly thread for longevity is good too.

 

Many thanks,

Tom


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#8 Silentiumiva

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 05:06 PM

My method is more complex, but the stem will stand up.

The braided button stem
While researching haute couture techniques, I visited many workrooms in Paris, London, and Rome to see how fashion designs were created. One of the easiest, most practical techniques, the braided button stem, is frequently used on the super expensive jackets and coats by Yves Saint Laurent and Givenchy. A characteristic of fine workmanship, it is easy to sew, very durable, and attractive.

Every button needs to be attached with a stem so there will be enough space between the button and the garment to allow the button to be fastened securely without creating a strain or puckering at the buttonhole. The length of the stem depends on the thickness of the garment section, but most will be 1/8 inch to one quarter inch long; however, on heavy coats, they can be ½ inch or more and, on shirts, they are usually less than 1/8 inch. You can use either two strands of regular sewing thread or one strand of buttonhole twist.

Rub the thread over a cake of beeswax to strengthen, then press so the wax will penetrate the fibers. Insert the thread into the needle using the needle threader if necessary.

With the garment right side up, begin with a waste knot about ½ inch from the button location. (It’s called a waste knot because it is used to secure the thread temporarily and will be cut off when you finish sewing the button.) Run the needle between the fabric layers and bring it out at the button location. (1)

Make several running stitches to create a small pad at the base of the button this takes a little practice to make the stitches so they catch interfacing but don’t show on the inside of the garment.

Insert the needle into the button, then pick up a short stitch on the garment so the two threads are about 1/8 inch apart and parallel to the buttonhole. Pull the thread until the button stem is the desired length. The finished stem should be as long as the garment section is thick; but since the braiding shortens the stem you’ll need to add 1/16 inch when attaching a sew through button. (2)

Hold the button away from the fabric; then go back and forth between the button and garment several times.

To make the stem, work from the button toward the garment. Divide the threads in half and make a buttonhole stitch around the threads on one side. (3)


Pass the needle under those threads (4)
and out through the center. (5)

Then make a buttonhole stitch around the threads on the other side. Repeat, alternating between the two sides until you reach the base of the stem. Secure the thread in the fabric with several tiny stitches. Cut the thread; hold the waste knots taut and cut them off; the thread ends will slip between the fabric layers.

Sorry, I can't get the diagrams to paste.

 

Thanks a lot! 



#9 Henry Hall

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 07:30 PM

Wax is surely used as a lubricant? 


Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

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#10 dpcoffin

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 02:23 AM

Wax is surely used as a lubricant? 

 

 

 

Surely not, or surfers wouldn't use it to make their surfboards less slippery, nor cross-country skiers their skis better at grabbing the snow, nor the hirsute to grab the hairs on their bodies.


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#11 greger

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 08:34 AM

There are many kinds of wax and mixes. Paraffin wax are good for wooden draws, so they slip better. Used it on the sled so that I could go faster. Downhill skiers put wax on so the skiis are slippery (melts the snow, in that sense, water skiing). Bees wax on thread is a lubricant and strength. The wrong kind of wax on downhill skiis and the skiis are very slow. Cross Country skiis can have several layers of wax, and hope they wear off at the right time. Go up hill with one layer, and then, downhill with the next. Wax is even used on saw blades so there is less resistance. 



#12 Jussi

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 07:13 PM

There are many kinds of wax and mixes. Paraffin wax are good for wooden draws, so they slip better. Used it on the sled so that I could go faster. Downhill skiers put wax on so the skiis are slippery (melts the snow, in that sense, water skiing). Bees wax on thread is a lubricant and strength. The wrong kind of wax on downhill skiis and the skiis are very slow. Cross Country skiis can have several layers of wax, and hope they wear off at the right time. Go up hill with one layer, and then, downhill with the next. Wax is even used on saw blades so there is less resistance. 

 

As a Finn, I must correct a small part of cross-country skiing: The tip and heel of the cross-country ski are waxed with slippery wax, the mid-part - which is off the snow while standing on both feet, but touches the snow when pressed strongly (the flex must be chosed according to skier's weight) is waxed with a grip wax. This way, using kicks for more speed is possible. Several layers, of course, are used when waxing, but mainly to saturate the pores of the sintered polyethylene base in prior to temperature-specific waxing.

I also might add that pretty much every Finnish kid hates cross-country skiing in school. :D


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#13 greger

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 07:51 PM

Thanks for the reminder about tips and tails. Around here the people I knew wanted the sticky mid section to wear off to slippery wax underneath for going down hill. I guess they were doing a bit of telemarking. Wooden skiis back then. Polyethylene base wasn't used back then that I remember. I think that showed up for waxless skiis. Don't remember metal edges either. Downhill skiis were far more advanced back then. The main person I listened to I was in his store listening to what he told his customers about waxing. He waxed a lot of skiis for customers. Another option was seal skins for going up hill and one layer of wax for going down hill. Around here it is rather vertical and high avalanche. Wet snow. Been in a couple of avalanches myself, not to mention small ones I kicked off and skied in, downhill skiing, that is. The snow is pushing and pulling and tugging. If I ever go back to skiing it will most likely be cross country (easier on the knees). The skiing world has changed a lot since I last skied. 


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#14 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 10:08 AM

My former assistant left to get a master's in textile conservation. Her research paper was on threads and their strengths. I asked her about wax and was assured that, yes, it would strengthen the thread. A disadvantage of wax is that it dulls the silk's sheen.

Sarah is now working on a museum project in Qatar; do we have any forum members there?

#15 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 10:10 AM

David, I have the images in Dropbox. I think I've done it. C

https://www.dropbox....ew=Scan0042.pdf

Edited by Claire Shaeffer, 24 April 2017 - 10:13 AM.

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#16 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 10:14 AM

It looks like your suggestion worked. Thanks, David

Edited by Claire Shaeffer, 24 April 2017 - 10:16 AM.

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#17 dpcoffin

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 11:10 AM

My former assistant left to get a master's in textile conservation. Her research paper was on threads and their strengths. I asked her about wax and was assured that, yes, it would strengthen the thread. A disadvantage of wax is that it dulls the silk's sheen.
 

 

 

Did she comment on whether beeswax makes thread more slippery? I've certainly heard of silicon-based thread lubricants, but still wonder if classic, non-formulated beeswax does this too.



#18 dpcoffin

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 11:40 AM

David, I have the images in Dropbox. I think I've done it. C

https://www.dropbox....ew=Scan0042.pdf

 

 

 

Sorry Claire, that link doesn't work, for me anyway; I just get dumped off in my own DropBox account when I click it.

 

After I post an image to Dropbox, I go to it there and click the Share button, then "Copy link" in the dialog that appears.

 

DropboxShare%20link.jpg?dl=1

 

The link that results has to have dl=0 at the end, like this:
https://www.dropbox....t seam.jpg?dl=0

 

Back here, I paste that into the dialog that appears when I click the little green rectangular icon in the reply tool bar, middle of the 2nd row, for inserting an Image, but then change the final 0 to 1, so it downloads to the forum instead of requiring the reader to go to Dropbox. Or you could just paste the link with the 0 at the end like I've just done and let readers go see it if they want to click it.

Hope that's clear; please, if anybody's got a better way, let's hear it!

 


Edited by dpcoffin, 25 April 2017 - 02:37 AM.

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