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#1 Shanoxo77

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:07 PM

Hi everyone. I am pretty embarrassed of how this project is going, and I have some questions that I want to ask. I am an American living in the UK, and am alone all day so I have taken up sewing because I am really interested in it, but I am not professional at all, or even an apprentice. I took a sewing class about twenty years ago in high school, so that is the extent of my training. I am attaching photos of my first garment, which is a waistcoat. The pattern is New Look 6914 (marked as easy!). As indicated in the directions, I have pressed lightweight fusible interfacing to my fabric, which is a Liberty lawn cotton. I made the project the first time around and ended up throwing it away, because the interfacing was too stiff. I since learned you're supposed to wash the interfacing, so I did that and cut the pattern again. Things were better, but I got very confused when adding the lining. This is the embarrassing part... I tried to trim the lining before seeing the seams, but somehow it did not fit. So some seams have the lining sewed within, as a double layer; These look bulky and when I press them they tend to feather. The worst part is that now, when I press, the fabric just will not straighten. I had some problems with the topstitching too, even though I used a topstitching needle and Gutterman topstitching thread. I think my tension was all wrong so now I need to to-do the topstitching. My questions are, can this project be salvaged? My fabric has been marked with holes, so I believe the lawn may be too lightweight for my needle, perhaps. I specifically would like to know about the order in sewing the lining in with the seams. What do others tend to do, and are there different ways of doing it? My lining fabric is fraying very badly now, and it is puckering in several places that it makes me wonder if I should just bin the project again and start over. I appreciate so much any help from anyone. I came across this website through someone else's blog, but I soon realized that you all know WAY more than me, so I apologise if this seems so rudimentary! Thank you for your time!
It appears my files are too large to attach, unfortunately.

Edited by Shanoxo77, 22 July 2017 - 10:08 PM.


#2 Terri

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:51 PM

Since the photos dont show it is difficult to see what is going on.
A lined waistcoat is nor the best choice for success as a getting back into sewing project. A simpler garment such as pyjama trousers might be a better place to start.

#3 greger

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 04:37 AM

Lining needs to be looser. The fit of the garment is not the lining. Plus, they can shrink. Seam allowances on linings, some places, can be half an inch to prevent fray. Pinking shears are best for cutting linings. 


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#4 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 08:44 AM

I know several teachers in the UK. Where are you located?

I googled 6914 and found a Woman's vest (US term). Is this correct? This wouldn't be my first choice for a beginner, but it could be manageable. Patterns marked Easy are only easy if you already know how to sew because the instructions are limited. My suggestion is to try to salvage the garment--think of it as a learning experience--even if it isn't wearable.

Let's start at the beginning. You should preshrink the fabric, interfacing, and lining. This doesn't mean wash it.
It the interfacing is too stiff, you may be able to press until warm, then pull it off.

The lining should be assembled separately from the garment. If you haven't done this, carefully rip the lining out and take the sections apart or cut a new lining. Mark the seamlines on the lining; do not trim them before stitching. For this project, I would consider a tracing wheel and tracing carbon in white. Then sew the seams together by hand--that's basting.
Before machine stitching compare the lining to the garment. If it is a vest, it should be the same size as the garment.

If the lining and garment are the same size, machine stitch the lining as indicated by the pattern. Go back to the pattern instructions to sew the lining to the garment.

I disagree with gregor about cutting out the lining with pinking shears. If this is a closed lining, the seams don't need to be pinked and good pinking shears are expensive. (A closed lining is sewn to the garment at all edges.)

I agree this is a difficult first project and you may not have a wearable garment; when I teach workshops, students make samples or sample garments so they can focus on the techniques they want and need to learn. When you begin your next project, consider an easy shirt or skirt with no lining. My first sewing was for a doll. I was very creative and put the sleeves in upside down so to make tulip sleeves. My mother saved it.

Another thought--since you purchased a nice fabric, you apparently have good taste. This forum is not the best place to learn to sew simple items such as pillow covers, but they can be rewarding when you have a finished product.

There are some websites that have techniques for beginners; sadly, I don't know any.

Sewing can be very rewarding, but we all agree that it is more difficult to learn by yourself.

Good luck.
Claire
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#5 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 04:21 PM

Shanoxo77 - You might find the help at patternreview.com a bit more suited to your current needs. They even have 5 reviews of the specific pattern you are using done by other home sewists.

 

Definitely keep coming here to study for correct, professional construction techniques.  But at these early stages, the other site may be a better starting place.


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#6 greger

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 05:58 PM

Pinking shears are nice; not a requirement. Half inch seam allowance (many home sewing patterns are an eighth inch wider @ 5/8 inch). 

 

Linings even or loose? Linings are not all the same as anything else the same in any garment? Various cloths and canvases can shrink and stretch over time. So, there can be some conflict. Linings are not very important and not a part that is fitted to human body. Some tailors put in an inch fold a couple of places to make for sure there is no interference with the fit of the garment, or some other method. One method is to put a book or block of wood underneath the garment and baste the lining in place. 


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#7 Shanoxo77

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 07:35 AM

Thank you all so much! It's been very useful reading your tips. I'm currently in the Leeds area, but I'm heading back to Michigan soon. I do have pinking shears, but I still found the material to be very quick to fray even after pinking. The lining material I bought was just a cheap poly that I found on sale. I managed to make the garment to the end stages (looks good, as long as no one peeks inside!) but I am now trying to get a better fit along the chest, (high bust area) which is a little bulky. I am also working on two shirt projects, which are going better. I will try to post photos of the vest again when it's finished. Thanks again everyone for your suggestions!

#8 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 02:09 AM

Where in Michigan are you moving to?
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Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#9 Shanoxo77

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 08:19 AM

J. Maclochlainn: I will be in the Detroit area, are you familiar with it?

#10 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 01:46 PM

Shanoxox77 - one other tip and believe me I like to save money whenever possible - NEVER use cheap polyester lining for any reason. If you can't find 100% rayon (bemberg) at least find a 50/50 poly/rayon blend. Not only is it nasty to sew with, its even worse to wear!

 

I'm currently working with a mystery fabric (I think its 50/50 rayon/poly) to replace a RTW lining in a jacket ( like the poly you described). I'm altering it as I've dropped some weight. The mystery fabric feels great on my skin, is heavier yet breathes better, handles easier, and was only $1/yd. Don't be afraid of a bargain, but stay away from cheap. :yes:


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#11 seamlessliza

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 07:06 PM

I can recommend some great quality linings from The Lining Company - http://www.theliningcompany.co.uk/



#12 tombennett

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 03:13 AM

Dugdale Brothers have some beautiful jacquard Paisley.






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